The Sass Menagerie.

On the heels of the robin debacle yesterday, I sure wasn’t looking forward to seeing what progress my fractious feathered friend(s) made in the past 24 hours, so I procrastinated going to the front door this morning.

As has been my morning routine for about the last four or five months, along with checking out the weather before I go outside, I also spread peanuts on the porch for my furry and feathered friends. As you know, that ritual all began with tossing out a couple of peanuts to one critter, that cute gray squirrel I named “Grady” way back in the Fall.  Now the “breakfast club” that convenes on the porch includes a fox squirrel, black squirrels, jays and cardinals. 

I steeled myself for the mischief as I walked down the hall

I opened the door, the bag of peanuts at the ready.  Right away I couldn’t help but notice a long and skinny strip of blue cellophane dangling at eye level and blowing gently in the breeze.  I looked up to discover half of the coach light elbow was filled with a collection of twigs, brush and long strands of dead grass.  There were even some pieces of newspaper balancing atop of the nest fixin’s and some of that debris had landed on the mailbox lid.

While shaking my head, I spread some peanuts onto the porch and resolved to nip this nest-building venture in the bud before it was too late, i.e. blue eggs, hatchlings and chicks, the likes of these:

I ran around collecting a few supplies as I decided to do this quick-and-dirty job from the door stoop rather than pulling the car out of the garage and dragging out the ladder, thus missing my walk.

However, in my haste to pull down this nest in progress, I made a faux pas … I forgot to be mindful of the porch pals.  When I opened the storm door to poke the nest materials into the garden with a sturdy piece of cardboard, four squirrels scattered to the wind, then quickly regrouped at the base of the steps with a reproachful look that said “you scared us – we were eating peanuts!”

I took two flimsy grocery store bags, filled them with more store bags, then poufed them to fit into the elbow and on top of the light, all the while muttering that I wasn’t running a nursery here.  Finished, I took a look – well, it was no candidate for “House Beautiful” but I crossed my fingers it would do the trick. 

A whole lotta of cheeping and chattering going on.

I stayed at the door a few minutes.  I had that uncomfortable feeling that I was being watched – the squirrels with their unblinking gazes, still circled around the steps and the male cardinal cruised on by, as did the blue jay.  The blue jay screeched, an obvious attempt at getting me to close the door so this tall human was not looming through the glass, or hovering near those peanuts, so they could be snapped up and enjoyed.  Hmm – so what about this sass coming from my little menagerie?

And then there was the robin sitting in my neighbor’s tree, most likely the primary builder of the home for his missus.  It didn’t take long for that bird to discover its handiwork was gone.  I could see the scowl and hear the chattering through the storm door glass. While he had visions of “Home Sweet Home” I pictured the coach light crashing down with the weight of a couple of worm-filled robins nearly ready to fledge like this pair.

I was tempted to run and grab the camera to capture the moment for this post, but instead I tossed out some more peanuts, a little peace offering to the pouting porch pals for their inconvenience.  I felt a little guilty.  After all, I enjoyed monitoring the neighborhood and Park robins and their offspring, then sharing those photos in my blog posts in the Spring of 2018.  I know it is all about location, location, location – just as the ads state, but, I just couldn’t have them setting up house there …  anywhere else I’d have been agreeable to.  After all, who doesn’t want to witness the miracle of life before their very eyes?

Perhaps I’ve tarnished my crown of nature lover just a little?

I’ll leave you with this quote below; the full version of the poem can be found at the attached link: https://allcreaturesgreatandsmall.com:

All things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all. ~Cecil Frances Alexander

[Header image from Pinterest]

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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76 Responses to The Sass Menagerie.

  1. susieshy45 says:

    Hi Linda,
    I love the poem- it has been titles of James Heriots’ famous books. But about the nest, thank God there were no eggs or fledglings inside.
    Glad the furry morning buffet creatures didn’t scare enough to run across the street to hide from their new Linda. Is the weather still wet and rainy?
    The blue eggs are so beautiful. Where did you get such good closeups of those nests?
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Susie – I wanted to tear down that nest before any eggs were laid … I would not have taken it down then. I was going to wait and just keep pulling the nest fixings down as I usually do, but we are having rain now (and a storm is brewing out there so I hope I can catch up with some comments as the post took me awhile to do). We will have rain tomorrow from late morning through mid-day Friday and Saturday as well (maybe part of Easter Sunday). The robins will put up a full nest, which they weave together and then cement it to the light or a tree by pudding mud on it – it is pretty amazing to see these nests, but it would be too heavy for the light and it is bad, the poop splats are all over the porch and mailbox. The pictures I used in my blog posts last year – in May. They were from my friend in Virginia. A robin built a nest on her deck and she documented the nest every day. On the 13th or 14th day and just before they were ready to fledge, a snake came and got all but one chick. My friend took the pictures with her camera phone. I took the other picture – a nest in an eavestrough – you see how big the babies got!

      Liked by 1 person

      • susieshy45 says:

        It is sad that the snake got all those lovely babies- it is really sad that nature does not allow some cute animals to survive into adulthood.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I felt really badly about it too Susie. I was going to mention the story about the chicks in this post, but somehow it didn’t fit. There are new followers this year who do not know that story, but I omitted it anyway and just showed the miracle of life. Nature is too cruel sometimes with the idea of survival of the fittest. I would not have torn down the nest if there were eggs in it – I stopped it before it got that far.

        Liked by 1 person

      • susieshy45 says:

        I know that and love you for that. I was talking of all those lovely kittens too that got lost in the mad scramble that is life- some getting killed inside the car engines, some getting run over by our cars, some poisoned, some thrown into the desert- it is a hard life.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Thank you Susie … I will cringe as I walk or drive down the street and a squirrel runs out in the middle of the street and pauses there. Why do they do that? Why do they not just run as fast as their four legs will carry them so they get to the other side? Nope, they pause in the middle. My heart skips a beat hoping someone will stop. At the last minute, the squirrel bolts across – whew! Next time they won’t. I cannot stand to see animals who are hurt – why I ever thought I would become a veterinarian I don’t know. I thought I was going to save them all? I don’t know. I got rid of the nest before the family would arrive – I would not destroy it if they had moved in already. The robin looked at me again this morning – I felt the stare. I was not indifferent to it. I have a soft heart for animals.

        Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I have used the poem before in this blog but I wasn’t sure what to use as a header picture today – I could have used a robin picture, so decided to find the poem if they had it as an image, and they did. I know now that you said you read another author that was similar. My mom bought me all of James Herriot’s books … they were a series.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Joni says:

    Those are great pictures of the robin nursery! I don’t think your nature crown is tarnished – you’re just being realistic. They need to set up someplace else. I checked my new lights this morning and luckily they seem to be leaving them alone, but I would do the same thing if they decide to build again. One year they had pieces of tinsel left over from someone’s Christmas tree, strands of it adorning the nest, hanging down in a festive touch….. I recognize the poem as a song, perhaps a children’s choir school song?

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Joni – I am glad you enjoyed seeing them – they went from scrawny-looking, closed-eyes hatchlings to cute little chicks. When you see how big those two robin chicks were in the large picture, (this was the day before they fledged), and there was a third chick in the background, their nest and babies would not break down the gutter but it would/could the coach light. Not to mention the mess. Even though I rarely, if ever, turn that light on as I have a pole light out front, I still don’t want it broken. As to the tinsel, I can just imagine that those birds see the tinsel on the Christmas trees that are out for the trash and gather it and keep it somewhere for nest-building time. That is what this long blue piece looked like – the same size and maybe a little longer – it looked like Easter grass, but longer. I won’t be writing about them anymore this year and will turn my attention to other people’s homes and/or the Park and those robin nests. We had some ugly weather last night – not severe, but lots of rumbling and I shut down finally and unplugged the computer. We’re supposed to have more stormy weather today … not liking this weather at all and I see it as a repeat of last Spring!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean says:

    I had that uncomfortable feeling that I was being watched…

    That made me laugh out loud. I know that feeling, having the forest primeval as my backyard. I adore your robin eggs to chick photo series. I’d forgotten about that little snippet of poem. Such a perfect addition to the theme of this post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, I might have been on this side of the glass, but the looks I was getting as I interrupted everyone’s morning ritual was too much! I really should have grabbed the camera, but with critters, the moment is fleeting and I may have come back and they were all gone. When I was younger, my mom bought me the series of books by English veterinarian James Herriot and he named each of his books after different portions of that song/poem. I always thought the titles were coined by him until recently. That snippet is actually from a poem written in the 1800s and a hymn for children according to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Things_Bright_and_Beautiful

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Eliza says:

    Still a nature lover, just one that rathers not have a nest intruding.
    Thinking of you……….
    Love, light and glitter

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you – I started having my doubts there for a while. I tore it down before robins moved in … it was in the earliest stages. I’ll try and get a walk in before the rain – our weather has been ugly with a capital “U”. Love light and glitter back at you Eliza!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Eliza says:

        😦 Still ugly? I hope it gets nicer soon…..

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Very ugly Eliza – a torrential rain all day today, more tomorrow. Getting one inch (2.5 cms) of rain today. Another walk lost – tomorrow is not looking good either. I am still trying to embrace the idea of walking in the rain – can’t start doing it with this much heavy rain.
        Happy Passover to you in case you log off and stay offline due to the holiday and we don’t catch up due to the time difference. {{{hugs from afar}}}

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eliza says:

        Thanks! Been super busy these past couple of weeks preparing. Today is actually calmer now that it’s tonight for all preps are basically done.
        I hope you can get to walk soon……
        I think to get used to walking in the rain it’s just doing it – but need some proper rain gear…

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, that’s the problem – and it’s okay walking in warmer weather, but not so much on a day when it is in the 40s … it has been chilly here every day but one – that was a fluke, a 24 hour day in the 70s, then back to the 40s again. It’s not been a nice Spring at all here.

        Like

  5. ruthsoaper says:

    There is a fine line between nature lover and letting those critters invade. I don’t think you are doing any harm by making it an unfriendly environment for them. I have the James Herriot collection on my bookshelf. I read them several years ago and kept them because I will probably read them again. He is a great story teller.

    Liked by 3 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      I would let them go anywhere else they wanted to Ruth. I have sparrows in the blind but I can’t help that – they have tiny bodies and wriggle up there and I put mesh over it to deter them but it doesn’t help. I have cardinals in the big barberry bushes and don’t chase them out, but this is not nice and you saw in the picture how big those “babies” were. That was taken the day before they fledge. I was monitoring three sets of robin families in the Spring. I knew they were going to leave the nest – they were huge and sitting on the side of the nest looking out – the next day they were all gone, then one fledgling came over to see me, not too far from where the nest was. I really liked James Herriot books – he was a great storyteller about all his various visits through the years.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mackenzie says:

      totally agree with Ruth!! Loved reading this, Linda. You have a sweet soul toward all animals- but they must learn that Mother Nature Linda has her boundaries too- hehe 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • lindasschaub says:

        I hated doing that but they had not gotten very far with it – I one time opened the door and saw an entire nest up there – mud and grass was everywhere. They built it in less than 24 hours, since I’d last opened the door … that was why the eviction notice issued. I looked to see if there were eggs in it – there were none, so I took it down. I thought they’d “get” that rippiung down their handiwork everyday would thwart them, but it did not deter them in the least. Now I stuff the light elbow area and on top with bags – it looks terrible but it keeps them out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mackenzie says:

        It’s so impressive they can do that in 24 hours?! amazing… but also what a nuisance! So sweet of you to make sure there were no eggs in the nest though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I should find a new lamp, but I like that one as it goes with the house. I think perhaps I will see if there is a mesh cage of sorts I could put up there in mid-April (once the snow is gone, so it wouldn’t collect and bring the lamp down with its weight). It would have to stay up there through May … “House Beautiful” cover – NOT!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mackenzie says:

        oh that’s a great idea!!

        LOL. I’m cracking up. Seriously- you NEED to write a book. You have a way with words!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Perhaps it could reflect the absurdities of life – they are plentiful!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Shelley says:

    Aw, living through one stormy season with a robin’s nest on your front doorstep is enough to teach a human it’s not a good thing. You’re helping them reconnect with trees – that’s kind of you, really it is! Your post looks great – you did it in Gutenberg again? Nice work!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I like that concept Shelley – getting them to reconnect with trees. You put a good spin on my motives. I do have other birds around the yard, in bushes (especially cardinals who have nested in the barberry bushes for years, many generations of them) and the robins have picked other places in my yard (lilac tree), but they insist on coming here and I halted it before it got to a point to becoming a full nest. Thank you – I did use Gutenberg again, third post in a row. I did the gallery, justification and centering the pictures for this post. The day before I did the color block with colored text. I am glad I tried it, but have much more to learn yet. Onward and upward!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        Aw, glad you appreciated the concept. Yay, on your post – it looks nice in “G”. Way to keep playing with it. I’ll go back and test it out in another month or so to see if it has gotten any more user friendly. Yes, dear, onward and upward our skills will continue to grow!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Baby steps for me Shelley and hopefully in a month the bugs are all out – I tried to reverse my centering of the pictures after I thought it looked odd with the post title at the left and WP wigged out a little, so I hit the undo button – whew! As long as this upgrade or new WP version (5.2) being rolled out near the end of the month does not mess up my theme, etc. I will just deal with learning “G” a little at a time. We have a very ugly day here – torrential rain, up to an inch today and more rain tomorrow. The only day that will be nice is Easter, then returning to a rainy pattern again.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        You’re wise to take it slow. Great, another update, but hopefully it is one to fix the bugs people have been complaining about. I hope my theme survives the update again. We have beautiful weather here today, tomorrow and Easter will be maybe a bit rainy. I’m looking forward to soaking up the nice weather by hanging out with a dear friend. Hope you find time to figure out things you’ve been wanting to. Nice weather is just around the corner, right?!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        The spam issue has gotten better insofar as no one has said my comments ended up in their spam filter this week and I’ve only had one spam per day – over the past few weeks I had as many as 15-20 daily. Yes, the theme is worrisome for me too, though my theme is not as elaborate as yours, but they have discontinued it, and while they have similar simple themes, I expect one day I will get a message from WP that they no longer will support/offer it. Are you off work today Shelley? I am not, we don’t even close a half day like they used to … I just slept in and catching up here a little, behind in Reader before going to work. We have slowed down a little there. I am hopeful for better weather – this is quite a drag … northern burbs may have snowflakes tonight. Not my neck of the woods though.

        Like

      • Shelley says:

        Slowly things get better, and then worse, ebb and flow of blogging I guess. Not off work, but it will be a low-key day for me. Enjoy your Good Friday! xx

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, this is true. I’m trying hard to keep up again. I did more posts than usual in a week, but these last two are short. I’m behind in Reader again so will have to catch up this weekend.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        I wish I had words of wisdom on how to keep up!? It’s all about balance. You do way more than I do, that’s for sure!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Thank you for saying that Shelley – I am quite behind again in Reader and I must get some stuff done in the house today – no excuses as it is a total rainy day. Wherever I go tomorrow, it will need to be a paved pathway for sure. Maybe I’ll concentrate on taking worm pics.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        You’re welcome. I’m in need of doing stuff around the house too. It’ll be tough though – the weather is beautiful here today. Follow the robins…they’ll lead you to the best worms ever!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I was attentive to the house today (only because it was torrential rain most of the day) so I can have tomorrow off. I hope we get a beautiful day tomorrow to go on a long walk. I’m cool with worms, unlike creepy crawlies and when working in the garden, and dig them up, I’ll bury them again so the robin doesn’t get them – he gets all the sidewalk worms.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        I hope you get that walk today! Yesterday it was gorgeous here. Today it looks like rain. Happy Easter, dear, enjoy your Sunday and your walk!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        We had a gorgeous Easter Day – tomorrow will be nice as well, and warmer. Too bad we don’t get Easter Monday off!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        Yay, so glad to hear! Yes, I agree, I could use another day…and about 6 miles of walking to wear off all the calories I consumed!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. You have a right to a clean outside light!!!

    I tried Gutenberg again yesterday after Chrissie said it was much better than it had been. It took an hour for me to finish what I should have been able to do in 10 minutes. I thought she said it was possible to drag and drop photos again, but it did not work for me. I am not impressed and will put off using it until we are forced to adopt it.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Well keep us posted on their progress… or disrupted progress, rather! 😉😂 We had a reoccurrence of our little bird fellows the next year (the ones I told you about in your post yesterday), and we had to keep spraying it every day, until they finally gave up the fight. It was quite the task! Took us about 5-7 days of consistency to keep them away. The funny thing is, we have this big beautiful tree right beyond our porch. It’s a great place to build a nest. I so wanted to leave them a telegram detailing it as such. 😂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Ha ha – yes, I looked at that robin yesterday after I destroyed his handiwork. He was sitting up in the tree, no more than 20 feet away – why not make the nest there? It is a maple tree, sturdy and not terribly tall. At least they could be assured nothing would happen to the offspring. The gallery of photos of the robins from eggs to near fledgling in this post was from a friend of mine. Last year she discovered a nest on her back porch on a railing tucked in the corner. Every morning she went out she watched the robin sitting on the nest incubating the eggs, then the eggs were laid, hatched and the babies. Every morning she took a photo with her phone and sent it to me. I wrote several posts detailing their progress and told followers it was my friend who lives in Virginia. Then one day she came out of the house to let her dogs out and a snake had slithered up in the nest and gotten all but one baby. She was devastated. They were almost ready to fledge. I e-mailed her to tell her my robins were back – she said she is putting something in that corner to thwart the robins building a nest there and having the same thing happen. They have a lot of black snakes where she lives (Richmond).

      Liked by 1 person

      • What a great experience she had; even though, it had a tragic end. Sweet little birds. Good luck with your little battle of wills. Godspeed to you! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I felt badly for those sweet little birds and how they met their fate. My friend had some adrenalin going on there because in a minute she wrangled the snake into a pot and put a garbage lid on it and carried it down the street. She says snakes don’t bother her. Thank you for your well wishes.
        I feel badly but like you – can’t have that mess.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Wow! That’s awesome that she was brave enough to wrangle the snake! Serves him right for picking on those poor little tykes!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I agree – I sure could not have done that! I saw a spider in the house yesterday and now he is at large and I’m upset about that! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • 😂 maybe he found his way out the front door or a side window. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        You know one time she took a picture with her phone and e-mailed it to me of a long black snake sunning itself on the deck railing on a hot Summer’s day. And one time they had a hole near their back door and they thought it might be a snake hole. They had a pest control service come in and he put some kind of scope in this tunnel-like hole and said it led to their basement and likely it was down there. I’d never go in the basement again until I saw a body! They live right in the city in Richmond, Virginia, not in a rural area!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Holy cow! 😂 Now, I’d keep the black snake around, because they kill off rodents and even other venomous snakes, but that hole in my house, I would definitely want a scope of the whole house till it was found!! 😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Me too – she was really nervous about it, plus they have two Red-tick hounds that they got as shelter pets when they were a few years old. Since they were not puppies, they were afraid the dogs may have never seen a snake before and might try to attack a snake and get bitten.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Aww, I just love those photos. 🙂 And I’m sure they will find a spot soon enough to start creating their new nest in. 🙂 xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I suppose we all have to do what we have to do in our own personal worlds. I’d leave the nest up and find a solution to discourage the happy couple next spring! I hope your weather gets better!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Laurie says:

    I did not realize that you have only been feeding Grady and his pals since this fall. I thought that was a long-standing routine of yours. So funny that they did not like you standing at the door. They were protesting your presence, but they will accept your presents! The robins would have regretted that location for their nest. Every time you opened the door, they would have been disturbed. I think ultimately, you did them a favor. Your crown is not tarnished at all!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you for saying that Laurie because I do feel badly, though no one had moved in, they were just beginning to build. I don’t want to get a different type of light that is dome shaped, as I like the coach light – I did get a new dome-type light at the other door as they built nests on top of the light, just like here, covered by an awning – they were happy, happy, happy. I had to walk underneath it every day … I was not so happy, as stuff fell down on me, first mud, then poop was all over the door. And I’d open the door to have the mother robin fly off the nest and nearly hit me on the head buzzing by. I just started feeding Grady in the Fall – I tossed out a few peanuts from my Ziploc bag when I returned from walking one day and he was waiting for me the next day – unfortunately Grady never gets the peanuts most of the time as the birds snag them and the fox squirrels arrive before Grady and the two black squirrels. They don’t just take one peanut and go. They sit and feast on them and I’ve returned home from walking and there are Grady and the two black squirrels sitting there – nothing on the porch. So I go into the house and get some from them only to watch the fox squirrel(s) encroach once again. The fox squirrels are bullies … I’ve seen them try to take peanuts from the smaller squirrels and run them out into the street. I think I am going to have to stop … I don’t want to look out there and watch one of these little guys get run over because I fed them peanuts and they are all scrambling to eat. I enjoy them, but sometimes I think I should have contained my peanut dispensing to the Park only. I worry when Parker sees me approaching the Park and waiting to cross the street and he zooms over to see me, not mindful of the cars. My soft heart can only tolerate so much. 🙂

      Like

  12. They need to learn what’s yours is yours. You share food for them but not your home….lol It is such a mess you had to do it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      That’s right – I had to draw the line with them. I am sure they will give me dirty looks until they find another place to build a home. They didn’t get too much building done today – we had an all-day rain today and same for tomorrow.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Sometimes they can nest too much where it is problematic. One pair nested on our satellite dish a few years ago, but they were in the back of it so did not impede signals. Sometimes robins nest within our gazebo and defecate on the wood excessively. Now i stop them early if they get crazy nesting ideas. Most places are fine, but a few are questionable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, you’re right Tom. I’m fine with them in the trees, the cardinals have been in the barberry bushes for many generations, but this no. I have had issues with the sparrows getting into the blinds and had to put mesh over the blinds permanently and now can’t open them. They flew up the opening and nested in there. I could hear the babies cheeping when it was quiet in the house.

      Like

  14. Oh you are so sweet towards all in nature and I totally see your point about the nest bless you x ❤❤

    Liked by 1 person

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