Brrr!  Break out the down … December is here! #Wordless Wednesday

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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54 Responses to Brrr!  Break out the down … December is here! #Wordless Wednesday

  1. Pam Lazos says:

    It always amazes me how they don’t freeze to death, Linda, but their feathers have special insulating properties which oil actually destroys and which is why oil spills are so deadly for wildlife because it’s hard to get the oil off and the birds generally don’t survive even if the oil can be removed. Not that you asked.😂 I wrote about it in my novel, Oil and Water, and for some reason these photos reminded me of that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I haven’t had cable or any TV for about a decade now Pam, but I used to like the Dawn Dishwashing Soap commercial that showed the duckling covered in oil from such an oil spill. Then someone bathed the duckling in a sink with Dawn soap and the grease came off and it was squeaky clean again and waddled around. Always made me smile. I like to read and hear about wildlife Pam – when I retire I’d like to subscribe to “Curiosity Stream” the nature show I hear advertised all the time. I have stood on the boardwalk by the Detroit River on a frosty February day because the eagles come to fish off the ice floes at one area and people came with binoculars and cameras. There would be a hundred ducks, mostly in the water and paddling or preening, some walking around on the ice. I always feel sorry for them, though to me ducks look perpetually happy. If only everyone cared enough to not let these accidents happen. That’s a commercial, but sadly many perish due to carelessness.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. peggy says:

    Such great pictures. Looks like they are de-feathering themselves. Ha

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Peggy – kind of like plucking a chicken! What made me laugh with these pictures when I looked at them later was this goose up front was frantic to pick out all those feathers and the goose behind was calmly grazing and paying him no mind at all.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Anne says:

    Beautiful photographs all.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love geese. Many folks don’t, but I do. So graceful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I do too Kate and I never get sick of seeing them in formation, or taking off and landing. This goose up front seemed frantic to pick those feathers out – I know the feathers get wiggly and don’t always fall out on their own.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I wonder if, over time, you could collect enough down from them to make a comforter? I imagine they’re not plucking it out now that winter is here. Nice close-ups, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Wouldn’t that be something Barbara! There were piles of feathers everywhere as many geese congregate on that strip of grass near the Riverfront at Dingell Park. My great-grandparents owned a small farm and my great-grandmother did just that. My parents had a dark gold-covered down comforter she sewed together and stuffed it with feathers from their geese. I was allergic to feathers so I couldn’t have the comforter on my bed. She also used to quilt as well. Glad you liked the pictures – I was very close to them and they acted like I wasn’t there.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Oh no, that’s too bad you couldn’t enjoy snuggling under your grandmother’s goose down comforter! But hopefully you got to take joy in one of her quilts. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I felt badly and my mother was making shaking the down comforter vigorously and a seam broke and I remember seeing feathers flying everywhere! We had two of the quilts – a patchwork and a starburst and I can picture them as we had them for a very long time.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………………Out with the old and bring in the new!(feathers)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    Usually, I love to watch Canada geese. Before Thanksgiving, however, we visited Bend, Oregon before traveling north to visit our son in Corvallis. The running paths in Bend were so covered in goose poop in some spots, we had to detour! Yuck!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I hear you Laurie – the worst is going to Heritage Park as the geese live near Coan Lake and walk all over the pathways, as do the ducks, but every so often, even where I walk daily, I check the soles of my shoes for a “poop check” – otherwise I have to look down when I walk.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Eilene Lyon says:

    That’s a plucky goose! I was allergic to the feathers in sleeping bags and pillows as a child, but I think modern down products are much more hypoallergenic. They don’t seem to bother me.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It sure was Eilene – it seemed like it was frantic to pull those feathers out! I was allergic as well and couldn’t have feathers near me but I think I’ve outgrown it as well. I was allergic to the stuffing that was in stuffed animals. I have one photo of me as a baby next to a big bear, then no more.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Scarlet, my scarlet macaw, is molting now too! Red feathers all around the cage bottom! It’s that time of year! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It’s amazing how many feathers they lose isn’t it? My white canary would hop from perch to perch and feathers went flying out of the cage, in the dishes … the dark canary wasn’t as noticable – poor babies. Male canaries don’t sing while molting, nor for about six weeks afterward. It takes a lot out of them – we used to tape them singing, then play it back to get them inspired to sing again. Do Scarlet and Tweety stop talking while molting?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Little pet birds are the worst! Their feathers fly out of the cage and go all over the floor. My two large parrots are manageable. Their feathers, fortunately, stay in the cage.

        They do talk a bit less while molting but not much less. Scarlet lost a bigger feather today and it was on the bottom of her cage. I said, “I see you lost a big feather.” She casually looked down on it and matter-of-factly said, “Yeah.” 😊 I can hold Scarlet upside down in my arms like a puppy. She is amazing! Tweetie is too! You should drive over some time to see them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Your birds always sound so companionable and loving Tom. And, of course intelligent from different things you have told us/me over the years. I felt so sorry for my little guys when they were molting, so listless and it seemed they didn’t care how many feathers were drifting around the cage, they just sat there, not really enticed by treats either.

        Like

  10. You’ve captured some great shedding photos! At first glance, I wondered oddly to myself, who is the little elf that runs behind to pick up the feathers for the down blankets/pillows?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Ally Bean says:

    These are charming photos. I love the first feather one. The contrast in textures is great.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Ally – glad you liked them. In that first shot, it was like the goose thought opening its beak could grab a few more feathers. That goose sure was fitful and frantic about picking those itchy feathers out.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Mackenzie says:

    Are they making room for their winter coat?! I know Moose went through a little stage when he shed more fur than usual and his fur came back thicker. It’s pretty awesome nature just knows what to do!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Nancy Ruegg says:

    Have to wonder why the one goose seems intent on removing feathers when you’d think he’ll need every one to keep warm for the next four or five months! We have a gaggle or two of geese that visit a nearby pond. Love to hear their squawking arrivals and departures–my que to look up in anticipation for their V formation to pass by. (Those who have to endure the noise all day probably don’t love them as much!!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You would think they’d hang on to those feathers for dear life Nancy. I have to say as many times as I see geese in V-formation in the air, taking off or getting ready to land, it always fascinates me how they travel. They are a close-knit bunch in the Spring when the goslings arrive. The parents are always attentive to their brood, but I’ve seen the goslings, once they get a little older, stray from Mom and Pop’s watchful eye and another “group” will keep an eye on them, especially when humans are around. A couple of years ago, two geese got in a fight – hissing and wing flapping and the youngsters were watching “Dad” – they started to imitate him as if to scare off the other goose. It was very cute to watch. You’re right about the news – it sure is loud sometimes!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Nancy Ruegg says:

        Fascinating observations, Linda! Wouldn’t it be fun for two bird-loving Schaubs to sit somewhere in one of your parks and view them together! : )

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes it would Nancy – we may not even need binoculars to do so! These two were bigger than life. I could have gotten even closer as one goose was busy pulling feathers and the other one was busy eating grass, both seemingly oblivious to me.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Prior... says:

    Love the way you led us to the feathers in the last two photos – so creative

    Liked by 1 person

  15. This is one smart goose! He figures he will give his down freely so the humans don’t kill him and take it! Lol

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Had no idea geese did this. Great photos!
    And of course…the cleverly worded title. Love it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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