You say “goodbye” and I say “hello, hello, hello.”  #Wordless Wednesday  #Ships that pass … 

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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38 Responses to You say “goodbye” and I say “hello, hello, hello.”  #Wordless Wednesday  #Ships that pass … 

  1. J P says:

    There is something really fascinating about big ships, probably because I have never lived anywhere they are found.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I agree JP. I have been to the Detroit Riverfront many times and never seen two freighters passing in the opposite direction. They were far away and I couldn’t see the names of either freighter, so when I got online I looked at the upward/downward vessel passages near my location but couldn’t tell as there was a lot of freighter traffic that morning. I always marvel just how close the fishermen will get to the freighters. I’d be worried about a big wave.

      Like

  2. Anne says:

    This is very cleverly put together.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean says:

    I didn’t know that saying was from Longworth. Huh.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Laurie says:

    One of my favorite Beatles songs!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Eilene Lyon says:

    Nice combination of classic poem, classic song, and your photos. Did he really coin that phrase or just build a poem around it?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………………….you are good at making me meditate……………………..on the scenery, and words in the poem………………………thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad this gave you a quiet moment Ann Marie. This was down at Bishop Park, taken from the boardwalk. In all the times I’ve been to the Riverfront, I’ve never seen two freighters pass one another at the exact same time.

      Like

  7. It’s mesmerizing watching ships pass each other. I imagine the pilots on board communicating with each other on their radios to make sure they give each other a wide enough berth.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It is mesmerizing Barbara and almost every time I go to the Detroit Riverfront I see a freighter, even if on the horizon. But this was the first time I ever saw two freighters pass each other like that. I wish they had been closer. Those fishermen in that boat, whose picture also appeared in my Monday post, did not seem worried about the waves that those two freighters had to be making as they slowly passed. It makes you wonder how far ahead of passing they start radioing one another to ensure there is a wide enough berth?

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s a good question. I know the pilots go out to the incoming ships on a small boat and climb a ladder up the side of the ship in order to get on board and steer the ship in. They are familiar with the port and take over for the captain. My great-grandfather was a pilot out of the port of Boston.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is interesting how they do that Barbara – they must be fearless to do that job as it would be risky being so close to such a large vessel.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Joni says:

    Good work Linda! You must have been up early to catch those two. I see a lot of ship traffic on the river, but seldom two passing either.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Joni – it was early and it was the first time I saw two freighters pass each other and I am often down at the River, so it was interesting to see. I wish they had not been so far away for the photo.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I sometimes do seem them closer up under the bridge, and agree that the smaller boats do sometimes come too close for comfort.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        There was a video I saw online a few years ago of a brand-new freighter, making her maiden voyage, out of Port Huron, Michigan and people were gathered along the shoreline to wave and someone was videotaping the event. Suddenly a pleasure boat came too close to the freighter, there was a big wave and the freighter clipped it. Next thing in the video was the scream of sirens – the videographer did not show the damage to the boat or passengers.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Oh dear…I don’t go under the bridge very often but whenever I’m there there does seem to be a lot of water traffic most days. Sometimes the freighters will go quite late in the season if the temps are mild and there’s no ice.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I think they go to layup in early January. I’ve seen photos of the ice cutters in the Great Lakes – they are huge and plow a path for the freighters if they are still transporting a load and it turns bitter cold.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Did I ever tell you my husbands Dad ran one of these freighters? My husband would go with him in the summer and worked on them too. When he and his brother were younger his mom took them to meet up with their dad at the different overnight stops. Loved your pictures, as always!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      No, I don’t think you ever mentioned that Diane – how exciting for your husband to work on a freighter and go visit too. We have a few freighter clients and before they created the Detroit Riverwalk about 15 or so years ago, there were cement silos near our office and one of those freighters came to load or unload. They were docked for several hours, so my boss and I went aboard a few times. This freighter took on paying passengers too for a ride around the Great Lakes, although they only had one stateroom as I recall, but it was a nice room and they ate in the dining room with the captain, as did we for our lunch. It was as fancy as a cruise ship. My boss used to go on a freighter trip every Summer, get on in Detroit, ride to another state and fly back but he had to stop doing that the last two years due to the pandemic.

      Like

  10. Amorina Rose says:

    Great pairing of images and quote

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Perfect timing to catch those photos. I love the ones with the ducks, they look so small in comparison to the mighty ships.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Wow, those are really long ships! I love the contrast of the little duckies paddling by.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, most of them are around 1,000 feet long and I’ve never seen two pass like that. I may see them go by right after one another, so I wish they had been closer. The ducks seemed oblivious to the big waves the freighters were making.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Giant ships! Wonder what they’re used for and what’s it’s like to be on one of them. Can you imagine the stories that the ship’s crew would have to tell? Like the greyish, blue ambient colors of the day, the ducks photobombing, and the H.W. Longsfellow quote you use to end the post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I should have made the entire post in B&W like you do – never thought of it and I aim to try it once in 2022. I’ve never seen two ships passing one another on the Detroit River Esther … it was interesting to watch and it’s too bad they were so far away. Sometimes you’ll see one fairly close on the River and can see the name, but I couldn’t tell the name. My boss took me a couple of times on a freighter which belonged to one of our clients when it was close by loading or unloading cement. The cement silos used to be near our offices, then they revitalized the area and created a River Walk so they got rid of the cement silos and put them somewhere else. They are huge freighters, sometimes 1,000 feet long. Those ducks did photobomb didn’t they? They wanted to show people they weren’t afraid of the big freighters.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Were those 2 ships passing each other?? I didn’t know that was the case. I thought it was a massively long ship. lol. That would’ve been an interesting experience for you to visit a freighter. Things that are so large can be intimidating in its sheer size.
        The ducks were showing off that huge freighters don’t mean a thing to them; those brave souls!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        The picture was not all that clear as they were so far away so that’s why I included the passage about two ships … I wish they had been closer to shore. And it was fun because of the ducks and the fishermen who were waving at me from shore as I took the boat pictures. It was a nice interlude in the morning.

        Like

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