Mute Swan (M011) Update.

Like many of you, I was interested in learning more about this banded Mute Swan M011, the subject of yesterday’s blog post. It was the first banded wild bird I’ve ever seen – talk about being at the right place at the right time, so this event makes up for my unsuccessful participation in “The Great Backyard Bird Count” last month.

Here’s some information I have gleaned. I was surprised to learn that Ms. Swan has been wearing that neck collar for nearly eight years:

The Mute Swan was captured and neck collared for identification as part of Ph.D. research with Michigan State University. The goal of this research is to understand the movement and survival of Mute Swans in Michigan and is being conducted in partnership with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services. The outcomes of this research will inform management strategies for Mute Swans in Michigan and across the United States.

As part of the research, neck collars were placed on select Mute Swans in several areas of the state during the summer of 2014. They will be continuing to mark and monitor Mute Swans across the state for the next few years.

Mute Swan M011 was captured and banded in August of 2014 about sixty miles from here at St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area (Harsens Island, Michigan).

There was also a website to submit information on many species of banded birds. It is the Federal Bird Banding Laboratory (a/k/a Patuxent Research Refuge Bird Banding Laboratory), so I filled out the form and their requested criteria about M011 and submitted three photos. For my submission, I will receive a Certificate of Appreciation.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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63 Responses to Mute Swan (M011) Update.

  1. peggy says:

    Well this was interesting. I guess the band does no harm since she has worn it for eight years. That was great that you let the proper people involved in this banding program know where M011 was at the present time. Thanks for this information Linda – this completes the story about this band.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Zazzy says:

    Interesting indeed. I wondered whether it might be the kind of band that eventually fell apart but I guess not. And it looks like it must not bother her over much as she’s been wearing it eight years. Perhaps she’s considered especially cool by her bird friends for having the fancy jewelry. You are especially cool among my people friends for finding out more and reporting her movements. I hope it helps their study.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought the same thing – I figured it would fall apart too, especially since she’s always diving in the water and the water in this Creek is not all that clear. In the Detroit River, it is clear near the shoreline and you can look down into it. You’re right – the other swans might be jealous. Thanks for saying that Zazzy – it was fun to participate and help with their study and imagine how many places this swan has been and people saw or photographed her in the last eight years.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Congratulations on your contribution to the study! Very interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Anne says:

    Thank you very much for the update 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. That’s interesting. It looks so doggone uncomfortable but I guess they adapt.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought it was interesting too Kate. It reminds me of when small scarfs tied around the neck were a big fashion accessory. Sometimes it would get on my nerves, but it went with my outfit, so I endured.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I never did scarves and still don’t. After menopause, I couldn’t do turtlenecks either. It all feels like strangulation. The scarves get into things like food. I’m too practical.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I do like turtlenecks, especially for outside in Winter, but they bug me in the house. I feel like I don’t like anything around my face or neck anymore, so I hike my hair up in a high ponytail. Do you remember the velvet chokers with the cameo in the middle that were popular in the early 70s? I can remember thinking “I can’t swallow in this thing!”

        Liked by 1 person

      • I had one of those cameos. It was my mom’s. I wore turtlenecks all the time until menopause which seemed to put a choker around my neck!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Back when I worked on site, I had certain “comfy” outfits I’d wear when I anticipated a long day, like filing a big brief for example. Now they do all the filings electronically but briefs that went to the appellate courts had to be bound with special covers and something like 5-6 copies …. all something we had to do because using a service to do that wasn’t allowed as you couldn’t charge the client for it. I hate constricting anything the older I get.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Eilene Lyon says:

    Thanks for sharing the information with us, and with the research study.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    That is so cool, Linda. You are helping a swan research project. Way to go!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Finding this Swan was great luck for both you and the researchers Linda! I’ve found a few myself and reported them. The neck band does come off after a while.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow! You’ll get rewarded for participating!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Nancy Ruegg says:

    That collar looks itchy to me, the way it ruffles up the feathers on her neck. On the other hand, trained ornithologists certainly know more than I about the impact of a collar on a swan! What fun to participate in the study, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I thought that picture makes it look very uncomfortable Nancy … I guess she is okay with it after wearing it for eight years already. I can’t imagine how cumbersome it would be to get used to at the onset though.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. J P says:

    I’m glad I’m not the guy who had to put that band on that swan.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Ally Bean says:

    This is wonderful news. You deserve a Certificate of Appreciation for your efforts. Mute Swan M011 is quite the looker.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Interesting and thanks for the update Linda

    Liked by 1 person

  14. trumstravels says:

    Interesting, well now we know the story! Eight years, boy that’s a long time but yes interesting to know what the material is because as you said, it doesn’t seem to bother her.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I was happy to find out her story and amazed she has been wearing this collar for eight years already! I would like to know what type of material it is as I wasn’t thinking of it as permanent and figured it would eventually fall off/disintegrate, but I guess it is permanent.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. It’s such a large band, poor swan!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Joni says:

    Wow, sixty miles is a long way from home for a swan I would think? Or maybe it’s normal?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought it was a long way too Joni. I don’t see swans flying all that much, as opposed to geese which I see in V-formation all the time. Then again that was in 2014 and maybe it looked around before settling on a permanent place to call home – a good place to call home is at Dingell Park where there are a lot of Mute Swans, especially congregating this time of year.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Swans do migrate, some more so than others. Did the Banding Laboratory tell you where else Mute Swan M011 has been spotted over the past eight years? Congratulations on your Certificate of Appreciation!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – it was fun doing this! No, I have not received the info were M011 has been the last eight years, but it is forthcoming. Here is the message from the Banding Laboratory who acknowledged my info, but I had to send them my photos separately from my report as I got an error message when uploading the three pics:

      “Thank you for the photos, I have added them to your report. Unfortunately, we have not received the original banding record from the bander yet. However, as a result of your report, we’ve requested that the bander submit their data as soon as possible. Once they do, your certificate (with the bird’s banding information) will be emailed to you. Thank you for reporting!

      Regards,
      Kyra Harvey
      Bird Banding Lab Staff
      U.S. Geological Survey
      Eastern Ecological Science Center
      Bird Banding Laboratory

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Prior... says:

    Thanks for the follow up and you Deserve the certificate of appreciation !!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Pam Lazos says:

    Thank you for the info, Linda.🙏❤️💕

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Dave says:

    How fitting you get to be a part of this research project, Linda! Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Dave – it was fun taking part in this research project. The federal banding lab said it might take some time to get back to me with the info on where M011 has been sighted since 2014, but will do so when they e-mail the certificate – they were so appreciative.

      Like

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