Discovering doors.

HEADER FINAL

While I am still on a high from yesterday’s waterfowl extravaganza at Heritage Park, today I’m going to focus on the historical aspect of that beautiful venue.

Last year I visited Heritage Park for the first time, after many decades of whizzing right past it while enroute to Southland Mall.  On that hot August day in 2017, I spent a half-day familiarizing myself with the Park, between trekking the path that encircles the Park, and wending my way through the historical village, as well as wandering over to the petting farm and botanical gardens.  I’ve made many return trips since that first visit.

As I mentioned yesterday, things were hopping around the three-acre, man-made pond known as Coan Lake, which is in the heart of the historical village area of Heritage Park.  It was peaceful with all the waterfowl, so I was reluctant to leave there to walk on the perimeter path which follows along the fringe of the park.  I decided instead to revisit and take pictures of the vintage homes and objects, and their signage, which gives a synopsis of each one’s historical value to this village.   While taking nature-related photos is usually more my shtick, I wanted to participate in a fun blogging group consisting of unique door devotees.

I have been following a couple of bloggers whose Thursday columns feature beautiful doors they have discovered.  Janis Heppell’s blog Retirementally Challenged focuses on doors she has discovered while vacationing in the town of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.  Janis has amassed such a large collection of door photos, that she has divvied them up into weekly categories of doors that are rounded, adorned, weathered or carved, and much much more.  Last Thursday’s post, at the above site, was about chapel doors.  All are unique and in exquisite colors!

One day after I commented on these amazing-looking doors, Janis steered me to a blog by another door aficionado.   Norm Frampton, a Canadian who hails from Montreal, Quebec, has apportioned an entire page of his blog to door enthusiasts and features doors which are often severely weather-beaten, ornate, unusual, or even extraordinary.  Norm also invites fellow bloggers to submit photos of any interesting doors to add to this burgeoning collection.  Here is Norm’s latest post on interesting doors at the Annapolis Royal Courthouse in Nova Scotia: Click here

So in that vein, and now that you are familiar with the backstory regarding today’s post, I thought it would be fun to turn this into an assignment of sorts, and then submit this post to Norm’s page about my own door discoveries.

Historical Heritage Park.

Not every building in the scenic and historical village area of Heritage Park would be classified as vintage.  A few are reproductions of old buildings, recreated to meld into the village atmosphere.  For example, the Little Red Schoolhouse is colorful and quaint.  It was used for confirmation classes way back in 1882.  It has been restored, but, as adorable as this building is, its door is nothing special, so I did not include it in today’s post.

However, some vintage buildings and artifacts are genuine, i.e. the “real deal” … so here they are.

Where does this door belong – any guesses?

One glance at this weather-beaten door with the red background would suggest it might belong on a barn, right?

caboose close up1

This is actually a door on a railroad boxcar at the entrance of the historical village area.  Just look at the weathering on the door and imagine what cities this car has rolled through.  Now you see the door at a distance – it’s too bad that silver object has been hung on this door, as it distracts you from the severely weathered look.

caboose far away1.jpg

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The old barn door.

Well, if you guessed wrong about the weathered door above, and you were thinking it was a barn door, I’m glad you’ve stayed with me here, because below IS a real barn door.  The way it is barricaded shut makes you scratch your head and wonder whether that object is to keep the barnyard animals and fowl from escaping, or the two-legged prowlers from breaking in?

DOOR CLOSEUP.jpg

Admittedly, the barn and the fence could stand a new coat of paint, but that would surely take away from the weathered look which drew me to this spot to take the photo in the first place.  Here is a shot of the whole side of the barn which is located at the petting farm within Heritage Park.

DOOR FAR AWAY

A modern photography studio.

Another very old building located within the village is the Sell/Schonsheck House which was built at this location in 1909.  Its current owner is Rosecrans Picture Perfect Photography.   The door looks a little weather beaten, but that entranceway, just like the windows with their old wooden frames and opaque  panes, all contribute not only authenticity, but a lot of charm to this 109-year-old home.

door

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sign

The jewel of Heritage Park is an 1800s log cabin.

We all know the saying “home is where the heart is” and how many of us have strayed away from home, only to return to our roots many years later?  Well, I’ve saved the best for last, because here is a structure which was built around 1850 and is the City of Taylor’s oldest existing home.

The weathered-looking door matches the logs of this tiny cabin which sits within the confines of the historical village.

front door use this one

I stepped back and took a picture of the house at a distance.   Check out the windows on each side of the door; those pinned-back curtains probably are many decades old.

whole house.jpg

The left window features an ad for an October 6th celebration of the City’s 50-year anniversary, where you can actually go inside these historic buildings.  Many of the buildings received new roofs recently, thus preserving them for many more years to come.

celebration.jpg

Then, I went to the side of the log cabin to check out the windows …

window where.jpg

right window.jpg

… and the rear of the structure to see the rustic-looking back door.

back door.jpg

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It’s always fun to revisit the past, whether you are time-travelling by simply flipping through the old family photo albums, visiting places associated with your past, or just chattin’ it up with relatives.

Getting a glimpse of the olden days makes them seem like golden days – to me anyway.

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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73 Responses to Discovering doors.

  1. I always love the old doors with a big glass insert and lace curtains. Reminds me of grandma’s place.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Me too Kate and my grandmother had a wooden door with a big vertical oval with those lace curtains – it must have been a “grandma thing” .. she had an old antique-looking picture of a herd of wild horses in a sepia print over the doorway I can just picture it as I write those words, though she passed away in 1986 and we were only in the house one more time after that.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Anne. When Janis suggested I look at Norm’s blog on doors, I knew just the place to go for doors. There were a few more vintage-looking structures, like the water wheel and school, and especially the church which is very old, but the restoration has made it look modern, especially the doors … nice carved doors, but brass kick plates. Now I have to figure out how to post it on his site.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Mackenzie says:

    I love these doors! Such a rustic feel. Reminds me of my hometown in Ohio ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked this post. I thought it would be fun to play along with #ThursdayDoors and there were some interesting-looking rustic “real deal” items to share pictures of. I’m happy I evoked some nice hometown memories for you.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Fred Bailey says:

    Linda:
    My kind of town! Great photos.
    Fred

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Great building love the large cut log cabin, unlike anything here in UK

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I thought you might like this rustic architecture Andy … you should check out the Thursday doors site some rainy or snowy day when you are housebound. I’ll bet you could make a post of unusual or historic doors based on your travels or every day treks as well … I’ve seen many historic buildings on your site … the one with the trailing poppies down the side of the building would be a good start, especially as it nears the big Armistice Day celebration. It does not have to be current pictures. And there is a Twitter site #ThursdayDoors as well.

      Like

  5. I love places like this! Last month I took my client to two different villages and inside each building they re-enacted things like glass blowing, basket weaving, broom making etc. So cool!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I enjoy going there and we have what used to be called “Greenfield Village” and probably you have heard of it, or maybe even been there since you don’t live that far from me. They renamed it “The Henry Ford” a few years ago. I intended to go there on the 8th or 9th for the old car festival – it is a two-day festival and the whole grounds are vintage structures that were once Thomas Edison’s workshop where he discovered electricity, or Henry Ford’s shop where he built and repaired Model Ts. One day it rained and the other day was gray and gloomy – but it is an annual event for many years. It would be a good place to walk as the grounds alone are huge, not to mention the museum.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Oh you know I have been there before! We went when I was in school, I went with my daughters class and we went on our own. Last time the Oscar Mayer Wiener Mobile was there…lol It’s been years!

        Liked by 2 people

      • lindasschaub says:

        I was never that lucky to see the Oscar Mayer Wiener Mobile, but funny you say that because I’ve never seen it and the radio station I follow on Twitter (WWJ) had the Wiener Mobile visit the station last week and took some promo pics. I hadn’t thought of it in years. There is a lot to see there and I took my grandmother there when she visited from Canada – she had a great time as she grew up on a farm and kept pointing out all the farm machinery and what it was used for and we looked at old dresses and button-up shoes and she was telling me she had worn them. I am going to write a post about her going when I go visit Greenfield Village. Last time I was there was 1986.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I thought so too!

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      • I didn’t see this comment when I posted before. I refuse to acknowledge the name change, it will always be Greenfield Village to me. 🙂 Though I must say, the museum is stunning. I attended a wedding there and it was spectacular.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I saw your other comment Sarah – Heritage Park really reminds me of Greenfield Village as I remember it on the grounds. I like that rustic way of life and how they spotlight the important structures for the inventions that were made back in the day. Even the Firestone Farm with the sheep shearing. I will go there one day and take some door pictures again. I wanted to go to the Old Car Festival on the 8th or 9th of September. It is the same agenda both days, but I was going to go to the lighthouse on Grosse Ile for a tour – had reserved a spot for the 9th, so I was intending to go to the car festival on the Saturday. It was so dull and dreary looking and since the entire festival is on the outside grounds, I tabled it to next year. It is an annual event. I went to the Model A car show here in my City and two gentlemen who owned Model A vehicles said it was a fun event and more than just cars to see. Like you, I still call it Greenfield Village – it is a village and a museum and “The Henry Ford” is a moniker that makes no sense to me. I also attended a wedding there back in 1973 or 1974 … very beautiful but it was a really hot June day and that small chapel was packed to the gills and people were running outside to get some fresh air. I remember a guitar player sang Jim Croce’s “Time In A Bottle” just after they spoke their vows.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sounds like such a memorable wedding. I completely forgot about the chapel on site. The wedding I attended was in the museum.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        And I didn’t know they had weddings in the museum!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Rebecca says:

    I enjoyed the tour and the beautiful doors!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Rebecca – glad you enjoyed it. I thought that might be a fun place to get a few door pictures and contribute them to Norm’s site. This old log cabin is in remarkably good condition considering its age, and the fact that they transported it from its original location.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ann Marie stevens says:

    Dear Miss :Golden Days”………………………………….very interesting blog today and I never even thought about “doors on houses” before…………………..I was happy to read other bloggers about “Doors” too………………………………..”I never knew!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I glad you liked it Ann Marie – I never thought about focusing on doors before either. I figured Heritage Park was a perfect place to do that … did you see the sign for going in to visit the structures – did you ever go inside with any of your students for special occasions?

      Like

  8. TJ says:

    I LOVE doors. I think they are works of art. I enjoyed your post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks TJ – I am glad you enjoyed this post and it was fun treating this like an “assignment” and I’d like to go to Greenfield Village and do that again – there are enough old-time structures there I think to make another post. You’ll have to check out some of those doors … the ones in Mexico are just amazing, look back on each Thursday post. There are some carved doors that look like they weigh a ton, and the colors – mostly Southwest-style colors like pale orange or salmon, turquoise and bright pink. Norm’s site too … sometimes weather-beaten houses, or historical structures.

      Like

  9. You are just a wealth of information! I had no idea that there was such a following online for doors. That is so cool!

    Your photos were amazing. You did a great job capturing the texture and beauty. We use a door so frequently that it is easy to not appreciate it. Doors now-a-days are generally boring though. If you get in an architectural photography mood again I suggest Greenfield Village. All I could think of when I saw your pictures is “where in Greenfield Village is that one?” Ha. Thanks for sharing Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Oh, I almost missed this post! Thank you for the shout-out and I’m so happy that you will be submitting your lovely doors to Norm’s site. Let me know if you need any help setting up your link. I must warn you, though… taking pictures of doors can be addicting. I imagine this won’t be that last time I’ll see you on Thursday Doors 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I figured you got busy Janis – you were … the reunion. I wanted to make sure you saw it for the shout-out because I referred to your post from last week. I will let you know if I have any issues and thank you in advance. I posted it on Twitter Sunday night and Norm saw it there and read and liked it here. When I was at Heritage Park Saturday I decided it would be perfect to choose some of those old buildings and artifacts. I will go to Greenfield Village (a/k/a “The Henry Ford”) and get some more door pictures next year. It is all vintage structures … Thomas Edison’s workshop, Henry Ford’s shop where he built the Model T and many other historical buildings all on the grounds … I think it will be fun. In the meantime, I will be on the lookout for unique doors.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      OK Janis, I just submitted my link to Norm’s site … I tried earlier this morning and the place to put the link was not set up (I’m guessing) and all I could access was to create an e-mail account, so I backed off. Now, more meandering with an eye to nature … and doors. Not today though, it’s an ugly torrential rain out there; wish I could send some your way.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I once lived in a log cabin (with chinking as well),no electricity,no running water,no outhouse,isolated…..LOVED IT!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      That would be a photographer’s dream, using it as a blind, especially if you had a window to look out. I have mentioned my boss’ cabin in Georgian Bay before … it is a log cabin and one time was just like your cabin you lived in. They have added amenities through the years, but he told me it was very rustic in the beginning. He fought long and hard to get phone service in for long weekends when he visited so he could be in touch with clients and his wife finally agreed … now his cellphone has a signal and he has phone and e-mail service there

      Like

      • being away from electronics has its benefits.

        Liked by 1 person

      • being away from electronics has its benefits.
        I never used the cabin as a blind,as a base station yes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        It does have its benefits – getting away from it all is great. I use a computer for work and for keeping in touch with people, and blogging, or I could unplug too, because I am on here at least 10-12 hours a day – way too many hours! I don’t even text on my phone and a girl at the Park told me I could text by talking into the phone and punched a few buttons and set it up for me. I have not used it to text, but I charge my phone twice a week to keep the battery good. To do that I call myself for 20 minutes, then recharge it. So the phone recites the number I am calling, area code and all. It is silly. I unplugged from the TV back in early 2010 and I don’t miss it. I had free basic cable when I upgraded to a faster internet speed for remoting into work. But I view news stories right on the internet. You said you studied geology – you used the cabin as a base station then?

        Like

      • I meant away from all electricity.No heating,no frig no nothing. It affects us in ways I feel we are unaware of.
        A base station to go out from to take pictures not study Geology.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        Well, that’s a more radical way to go, but if you had a climate that was conducive to not needing A/C or heat, that would work. As to the fridge, you wouldn’t need one if you planned ahead and bought food that needed no refrigeration and you had a good natural water source and boiled it, or used bottled water. You’d really be roughing it though. For me, for Winter I stock up on lots of pantry items in the Fall, so I don’t go out all Winter, except for a few refrigerated foods and some produce about once a month – I could live without them if necessary, as I buy canned veggies and fruit to have on hand and powdered milk. In fact, during Polar Vortex I (January 2014) we had snow one night followed by freezing rain. I could not get my car out of the garage for weeks – the space is narrow between the car and the garage. Even if I could have backed out of the garage without slip-sliding into the door frame, the City snow plow pushed mounds of snow at the end of the driveway and before it was shoveled, we had the freezing rain that froze it solid. It was from mid-January to mid-March before I got out in my car. I had to have the battery replaced soon thereafter, even though I ran the car daily – it was a bitter cold Winter. I asked Marge to get me greens for my canary and that was it – I was self-sufficient for myself. Luckily I live simply and was prepared, or I’d have been in dire straits. What I did is not for everyone either and I realize that.

        Like

      • I lived there during the winter.I had a wood stove. I’d walk in & see my breath & wake up seeing it as well. I cooked off of the stove.It was one of the best places I ever lived! Made me feel alive & mindful!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Well, that’s incredible that you lived there in the Winter … your wood stove served to warm you and provide heat for your food and you bundled up when the fire died down, alone with your thoughts and no distractions makes it peaceful and easy to be mindful. That is an experience you will never forget and I commend you for doing this Wayne. Do you have pictures from this period of time in your blog archives now? I hope I am around long enough to see you put together a coffee table book like your friend did, a compilation of photos from years of immersing yourself in nature and the images captured along the way.

        Like

      • you & several others have said the same thing about me putting a book out.It’s been done so many times that its almost embarrassing to add to the pile. Besides it would take many thousands to do that.Everyone knows what I do here. Thanks for the vote of confidence Linda.If I do a book you’ll be the first to know.
        I wasn’t taking pictures back then.It was in 87-89.A rough time for me to be honest.I use to dress up in all white.I got the clothing from the Armed Forces.It was camouflage for winter time.I even had a white balaclava.I’d go out snow shoeing.You’d be hard pressed to see me! I remember once I was going down a remote back road during a heavy snowstorm & saw the distinct lights of a truck coming through the forest.I didn’t want them to see me so I went off into the forest.Now remember that the road is not travelled by anyone so there are no tracks……..except mine.I saw the truck go past but stopped a hundred feet down the road & backed up! They had seen my snow shoe tracks all of a sudden & wondered where I had gone? They backed up to where they could see the tracks heading off into the forest.It was a couple rednecks out drinking.I didn’t want to get shot so I came out.As soon as I moved they could see me.I didn’t say anything but just waved them on & continued on my way to the “Limerick forest”.That was a forest I constantly walked around in.The cabin I was in was at the end of a country road.Past it was this bush road I told you about & the forest.
        That whole time staying there changed me forever! It was a tough life & I know very few would be able to do it.To wash I heated up a large bucket of water on the stove.I poured the hot water in one of those black solar camping shower bags.I hung it up & put a large wash bin under it.I’d stoke the stove well & have my shower.This is during the winter when it would go down to minus 20 sometimes.During the summer I’d hang the solar bag out on the front step & have my showers outdoors.It was so remote that nobody ever did drive by.It was a dead end after all.
        I remeber once there was a huge wind/rain storm going on during a hot summer! Lightening was happening.I said I’m having a shower no matter what! I got half way through & a bolt hit not more than a few hundred feet away! I yelled up to the sky “OK……..I GET IT” & went back inside.Scared the crap out of me.When you see hear & feel a bolt all at the same time…..thats close!

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        This is an incredible story Wayne – I just read it twice, and all I can say my friend is that you had a lot of fortitude to get through this rough time. I admire your being able to withstand the severe elements and yes, not many could have been able to do this. They would have given up. You’re lucky those two rednecks didn’t try to harm you. Did you have to catch/capture food for your meals since you were so far in the boonies? If that is too personal of a question, you don’t have to answer, but I am just overwhelmed that you went through this experience, all alone. It takes guts to do what you did. This is not merely “roughing it” … this was survival. I won’t mention the book again … we are privy to your wildlife encounters and adventures just by scrolling through your blog.

        Like

      • no,I bought my food the same as anyone else.I drove to the cabin via my car.I worked in Ottawa as a land surveying instrument man.I think it took a hours driving one way to get to work.The cabin was near Merrickville,south west of Ottawa.
        I just checked on Goggle earth & see that the cabin is no longer there.Made me sad.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        Okay, thought you were living off the land as well, but you still had it tough. A long commute to the cabin as well. Did they take down the trees and cabin and build in the area?

        Like

      • no,it’s just a small open field now.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        I wonder why it’s gone?

        Like

      • maybe moved?Could of burned down?

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        Hopefully not the latter. Have you ever tried Google Earth? I have never tried it but maybe it gives you a better view? They moved that log cabin built in 1850 to Heritage Park without issue so perhaps this one was moved as well.

        Like

      • yep,thats how I know it’s gone.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’ll have to try it as I just use Google maps and it is hard to hone in on things sometimes. I looked for my house in Oakville awhile back and discovered it was not there and none of the houses on the street looked familiar. I joined a Facebook group about Oakville just to see what was happening in that city (which doesn’t look at all how I remembered it) and I asked in the group if anyone was familiar with Sandmere Place and told them my house/neighborhood looked totally different. The administrator of the group is a computer guy and makes housecalls and has lived in Oakville his entire life. So he said the houses were all razed and taller/bigger houses in their place – every single house. He went and took a picture of the “new” 497 Sandmere Place and sent me a video of a walk-thru by a real estate. Totally different house, neighborhood – made me sad as well. They did that with my grandmother’s house in Toronto … houses were 100 years old, all attached and after people died or moved, someone bought them up and made them into attached apartments. I Googled her house one day just to look at how it looked and thought I was crazy – where was her house? Then I saw no more street address for it – all one address for about 3-4 homes.

        Like

      • yes…….& one day all those new houses will be torn down as well.We all go back into the earth one way or another.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        It was quite a disappointment, I’ll tell you that and it was not like it was an old subdivision. It was brand-new when we moved in in 1958. My father was going to start working at the Ford Motor Company plant in Oakville and wanted a shorter commute – we were living in an apartment in Toronto. I was just looking at some of the “door posts” as people post specifically on Thursday Doors today. Now those are some historical places that have stood the test of time. Beautiful stone and heavy wooden doors or archways with ornate wrought-iron doors … none of this build a house, then tear it down so you can make it three times as big and charge three times as much for it.

        Like

      • some people just need to puff their chests out & Crow!

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, a lot of people like that around … not my kind of people.

        Like

      • thats why they need so much room ……..to create their own world to compensate.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        They are full of hot air – they need more space for that as well.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m glad to see you being pulled in among us by a friend. Welcome in the name of Norm (who is travelling today so I’m hosting for him) and all other participants. A lovely set of doors. Indeed, painted they might look better but wouldn’t be so picture perfect. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, I was pulled in, first by Janis’ doors from Mexico – wow! Then I discovered Norm’s site. How true this is about the paint … especially that barn door. This is a back barn, and I suspect they keep equipment for the petting farm housed here, but the weathered qualities did make for an interesting picture.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. dennyho says:

    Althought red doors tend to be my favs, that white boxcar door certainly is a winner! And yes, too bad about the silver white vent thing…

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, the red doors just draw you to them, painted or weathered looking. That silver vent sure takes away from the rustic look of this boxcar. I think we should suggest that they fix it to look more authentic since Heritage Park village touts the vintage look!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Ellie P. says:

    Love the door pics!!
    Love that blog title – “Retirementally Challenged”!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Ellie and Janis does have a great title for her blog. Those doors she features from her travels to Mexico are incredible and did you notice that Norm Frampton was from your neck of the woods? So, today was “publish day” for this blog post to be added to Norm’s page dedicated to doors. I put the link on his page in the designated spot. Norm is on vacation for three weeks so he has a fellow doors devotee monitoring the site. She welcomed me and retweeted this post. (You can only post on the page beginning today for a limited amount of time.) Another blogger stopped by – her photos were incredible too. I think this will be fun to do from time to time and over the Winter when I am hunkered down with the inevitable snow, I think I’d like to go through some old travel photos and try to compile another post, or at least upload them singly on Twitter to #ThursdayDoors.

      Liked by 1 person

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