There was a Fall-like feel in the air.

The road trip was long (for me anyway) … it was 20 miles from my house  to Oakwoods Metropark in Flat Rock, Michigan.  I had been leery of visiting there as so many of our parks are still flooded or swampy from May and June’s incessant rainfall.  I figured I’d take a chance and try and make a day of it, so I took my red vinyl boots in case I needed them.  It was beautiful weather, with low humidity and refreshingly cool for a late August day.  I aimed to take a long hike, then settle in to learn some sketching techniques and implement them on the nearby trail.

Because I sometimes get lost when driving, as I am definitely directionally challenged, I left extra early.  Oakwoods Metropark has been on my Trek Bucket List for over a year, so when I spotted this sketching class called “Walk, Talk & Sketch” … well, I was all in.  I figured I could also fulfill something on my future Retirement Bucket List, i.e. learning to sketch or paint as a hobby in my golden years.  Not only did I treat myself to the event (a mere $5.00), but  I bought a sketch pad and some number two pencils too.  I thought it would fun, and believe me, I was not ready to quit my day job and become an artist at the end of the day.  If you read my most-recent post, you’ll see why.  You can click here if you missed it. 

I found a place to park near the Nature Center where we were to meet, so I left the art supplies in the car and went off to explore.  Outside the building I checked out the enclosures and discovered an Owl and a Red-Tailed Hawk.  I’ve never seen an owl before and this one preferred the darkest corner of its enclosure, so mostly all I could see were glowing eyes and tufted ears.  I am going to ID it as a “long-eared owl” (no surprise there), but there was no name on its enclosure.  I later learned it was injured, then rehabbed and this is its permanent home, since it cannot survive on its own in the wild.

The Red-Tailed Hawk was singing me a song here … it has a rather evil grin, doesn’t it? 

I only knew this raptor’s name and ID because I passed its permanent home in the woods earlier that day.  Because enquiring minds want to know, I asked Paula, our interpretive guide, if this was indeed “Hawkeye” and yes it is.

I meandered down the pathway where I saw a hut made entirely out of tree bark.  I don’t know if it serves a purpose, but, as you can see it was roped off. I peered inside but there was nothing to see.

So what might be awaiting me in those woods  anyway?

The preliminary exploration over, it was time to hit the Long Bark Trail.  I had researched about Oakwoods Metropark in the past.  There are three trails and reviews stated that it was a haven for critters. 

So, I started on this trail which links up with the Sky Come Down Trail (one mile long) and the Big Tree Trail (3/4s of a mile long)  depending on which fork in the road, er … trail you pick.   I wondered what critters would cross my path?  Furry, feathered?  Perhaps a deer – now that would be nice.  What about a friendly raccoon?  That would make a great photo op.  Maybe a cute squirrel?  Metropark rules forbid feeding the wildlife, so I always leave the peanuts at home.

The Long Bark Trail had an overlook at a portion of the Huron River and watershed area. 

At this wooden overlook, I could see a marshy lagoon and some pond lilies.  Unlike Lake Erie Metropark which has several water lotus beds where the water lotuses rise high above the elephant-ear-sized leaves, these were just large lily pads floating on top of the water and there were no lilies blooming and since the pond lilies and reeds created an all-green and almost blah background in the marsh, it was very easy to see the stark white color of a pair of Mute Swans and a Great Egret who were companionably fishing in the lagoon.  They were quite far away, so I was lucky to get this photo.

There were many benches dotting the River’s edge, but seating was also found throughout the woodsy areas.  I found it interesting that every one of the wooden benches had a weathered look with splotches due perhaps to lack of sunshine as the wood never completely dries out.

Soon I was back onto a more defined path in a woodsier area.  There were mushrooms in many areas where sunlight was scarce.

There was a definite Fall feel in the air and the leaves and acorns scattered about looked more like a September scenario.

The breeze made it seem a mite chilly so at mile marker #2, the sun felt good.

It was quiet and peaceful and the only critters around were the mosquitoes occasionally attacking my bare arms and hands, or buzzing around my ears.  Sometimes I’d be startled by an acorn plopping to the ground from one of the many oak trees.  It was very still and I saw just a handful of hikers or Saturday strollers as I meandered along, likewise on the Sky Come Down Trail  and the Big Tree Trail. 

Here is a view of some of the trees on the latter trail.

I lost count of the amount of trees that had fallen in the forest and I noted they were left as if they had just toppled to the ground.  In many cases, those old logs presented an interesting pattern of decay …

…. or mysterious-looking holes …

… and sometimes branches or twigs looked like an over-sized game of Pick-up Sticks.

But what I found fascinating was the abundance of moss.  It was everywhere, on old logs, and on the pathway.  I’m guessing it was because only dappled sunlight was able to filter through the trees so there was moisture in abundance, especially given all our rainfall this year.

Moss was even on one of the walking paths.  The sunlight made all the moss look almost emerald green.

A grasshopper caught my eye when it hopped onto some gravel.  Once it saw the hulking human looming over it, that grasshopper went airborne but landed against my leg.  A faint fluttering against my shin seemed to stun it and it landed on the gravel and scrambled off for good this time.

Just a gal and her butterfly.

The highlight of my Saturday morning meander was the butterfly which alighted on the ground next to my foot.  I’ve never seen a blue butterfly, so I’m guessing, based on my research, that it is a Red-Spotted Purple.  Yep, you and I know it is blue, but that is its name.  It first alighted near a dried-up oak leaf, as you saw pictured above. That butterfly stayed in place for the longest time and I watched it opening and closing its wings.  It was as if it was rejoicing to bask on the warm gravel in that patch of sun.  Back when I had my butterfly garden, the experts advised to place large flat rocks around the garden so butterflies visiting your garden can bask in the sun.  It was a chilly morning, by August standards, and this was the only area of the trail that was not moss covered or mulched up and in the direct sun.  So Mr. (or Ms.) Butterfly was enjoying those sunbeams that were streaming down.  It stretched leisurely, opening and closing its wings, then leaving the wings spread out,  its beautiful colors displayed.  It was during this display of colors that I noticed this poor creature’s wings were tattered in many places.  However, when it finally flitted away, it did so by delicately landing on a wildflower without any hint of wing impairment. 

I insisted on taking a selfie with my fluttery friend, albeit a shadow selfie.

The butterfly had his/her own shadow magic going on.

I found the most human activity at the paved bike pathway which winds around the Park.  There were many bicyclists out and I walked along that bike pathway when I was done with the rustic trails.  The flowers interspersed with cattails blowing in the breeze was picturesque considering it was a ditch.

It was a large park, 350 acres altogether, and I would have explored it more, but I didn’t want to get lost or be late for the sketching event at 2:00 p.m.  I would have liked to visit the Butterfly viewing area and Monarch waystation on the other side of the Park, but I was lucky enough to see the blue butterfly so no need to stop there.

Meanwhile back at the Nature Center

Had I arrived just a few minutes earlier to the Nature Center, I would have witnessed the release of four Monarch Butterflies into the woods behind the Center.  I entered the building and saw the back door open and a few people gathered at the doorway.  A Monarch butterfly was sitting on a woman’s hand and as I reached for my camera, she said “here, let him sit on your hand and I’ll take a picture of it.”  Remembering what happened with the last friendly butterfly, I jumped at this chance and extended my hand only to have to fly up into the air.  Maybe next time.  The butterfly exhibit inside the Nature Center still had one Monarch that had just emerged and several chrysalises where caterpillars hung in their pale green sacs and will soon emerge as Monarch butterflies and be released just as these were.

I took pictures of the snakes and turtles inside the Nature Center, but this post is way too long already, so I’ll write about them my next time to this venue. We had a very rainy morning today – not lucky for racking up steps, but with a stormy day ahead, at least I was able to wrap up and put a bow on this post.

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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75 Responses to There was a Fall-like feel in the air.

  1. Fred Bailey says:

    Linda:

    Great photos; some frameable!
    Fred

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Shelley says:

    A lovely adventure where you followed a green dirt road (yellow brick road…). Glad you got to finally check the place out and get some miles in too! Lots to see there, you captured wonderful photos to remember it by!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, I did “follow the green dirt road” just like Dorothy and her pals did Shelley. It was a perfect weather day so that helped to enhance details along the way as well. The butterfly was so friendly and stayed nearby for at least 15 minutes.. I am glad you like those photos. I took many more and had to eliminate them as the post was way too long already.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        Just think of all the material you’ll have for your winter musings! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        At the rate I’m going Shelley, I should have stuff saved up to churn out all Winter. I had that all-day excursion two or three weeks ago … two parks and then the Ford Fairlane Estate. I’ve not even looked at the pictures yet, nor taken them off the card. In a few instances, I was able to make two or three posts out of past trips where I would normally just have a long post like I did with the last two at Oakwoods Metropark. I don’t think I’ll be going back there this year and the leaves were already starting to turn, so had to use those photos up.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        I’m positive you’ll put all of your efforts to find material to good use!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I hope so Shelley!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Sweet Red Spotted, though a little beat up (wing-wise) which is to be expected this time of year.
    The area really fondly reminds me of Sandridge Nature Center… where i often visited as a kid many years ago. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, is was so sweet Tom and its tattered wings didn’t keep it from flitting around, but it actually spent more time at ground level just poking around at leaves and perching on gravel. It sure was beautiful and I got a great look up-close look at this butterfly – it seemed so content to just bask in the sun. I am glad it brought back fond memories and I have to tell you that there were many parents there with kids – good, perhaps instilling in them the wonders of nature, and that was not only on the trails but at the Nature Center as well. Lots of turtles, three snakes – lots of “wow!”

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  4. Laurie says:

    What a beautiful place to hike and get your miles in. I love exploring new places. Your butterfly looks like he might have tangled with a bird, but got away relatively unscathed. Just a few little bits of his wing are missing. Too bad you missed the monarch release. That would have been fun to see!

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    • lindasschaub says:

      It was beautiful Laurie and a perfect weather day too. I like how there were different trails, ranging from rustic, to wooden pathways, gravel pathways, tree lined or through a woodsy forest-type area. So, there was something for everyone. Lots of kids there too with parents, either hiking or on bikes. Yes my butterfly was missing many parts of his wings and birds tangling with it sounds logical as they are big “bites” or tears. I was bummed to have missed the release and caught the tail end of that last Monarch heading out on that sunny day. He was sitting on that girl’s hand so daintily.

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  5. Joni says:

    What a great adventure Linda. I loved the trails among the tall trees. the owl (I’ve never seen one close up), the moss and the blue butterfly…….not so keen on the early signs of fall, but it’s coming, so you made them very picturesque! Sounds like a great day out.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked that adventure Joni. It was a picture-perfect day. Those trees were so tall and you feel so insignificant next to them. The moss was amazing, brilliant green deep in the woods, especially that soft moss pathway. My first owl unbelievably. The blue butterfly kept flitting around by my feet – it had no trouble lifting off, but was sunning itself on the gravel where the stones were warm and it was chilly that morning. I’m not keen on the idea of the Fall arriving too soon, especially after hearing the Farmer’s Almanac’s predictions yesterday – ugh!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I don’t want to know the Farmer’s Almanac predictions – so please keep me in the dark!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Our trusty weather guy says it is all nonsense and on social media the comments were flying that he and the other forecasters often can’t predict three days ahead … this is true as they are never accurate half of the time. I feel cheated by our Spring, and the Fall of 2018 which arrived with a hard freeze the third week of September and then we had snow in mid-November. Then an early Winter, and it never wanted to leave. Cheated by weather is all I can say – yesterday it cleared up beautifully by 10:00 a.m. – too late for me and we had a rain and rumbles in the afternoon. Walking every day will be easier when I’m not working – in the Winter the sun comes out and melts the ice (sometimes) and you could venture out. We have three beautiful days and maybe four because no rain til Saturday night. Will walk, walk, walk but get other things done too – will aim to get more miles racked up … hopefully anyway.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        The whole year has been a write-off weatherwise, IMO. This morning I went to the Farmers Market for peaches, for the first time in ages, and by the time I got home at 2pm, intending to sit out on the deck and read, it had clouded over and was cool, north wind……so frustrating. Lots of clouds in the sky, and the weekend which was supposed to be all sunny, now has rain. You’re right – they can’t even predict a few days ahead, let alone a whole season.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        It was really windy in the a.m. yesterday and always windier at the park. But it was refreshing to walk after all the heat and humidity the past few months. Your forecast sounds like ours – the beginning of the week we were told “a beautiful holiday weekend!” and now we have a rainy/stormy Saturday afternoon and evening and into Sunday morning, but the rest of the holiday weekend will supposedly be better. Now, they say our weather will be impacted next week and next weekend by the end of the hurricane and I hope not as I’ve got some things scheduled and pre-paid for next weekend. I should have thought about this being hurricane season and we get the dregs of the hurricanes about a week or so later. You’re right, a write-off is the perfect way to describe it and it’s been like that for two years now – unpredictable and erratic weather swings … I may not remember prior to that 2016-2017 season, but there were some events in the tail end of 2017 which I remember now being a fluke. My good friend/neighbor passed away that year and I recall speaking with her son on what would have been Marge’s 80th birthday (December 3r, 2017). We were outside that afternoon, him in a short-sleeved teeshirt and me in a light sweatshirt, and people I passed by in the neighborhood when walking home were stringing up holiday ornaments in weather that would be more like an early October day. I remember I walked twice that day –
        in the morning and then came home and did some things and went out a second time – it was that beautiful. That was the first time I really recall saying “this weather is not right” … I had spent the late Summer/early Fall working in the house, just walking and coming home to clean up insulation mess, three plumbing disasters, repainting their plumbing messes, and remember saying to myself – well I’d be inside the house anyway because it is so hot. – it was sickening hot every weekend and before I didn’t always come home from walking and head straight into the house and stay there in those days.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Today was nice and refreshing, but tonight has a touch of humidity in the air again…….sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        It is cool this morning but humid – the weather this weekend will be nothing special and now they say we may have the dregs of the hurricanes next week – hope it is done by the weekend. If it rains for the lighthouse this time, I’m not booking a trip next year … no refund if it rains. That’s why I got the season pass for the sunflower garden – it is good for four different days, as opposed to booking one day and it is crummy. It cost a little more, but that’s this year and includes the pumpkin patch event – I’ll think on the lavender event for next year – one time and that’s it and nothing else next year – the weather is too unpredictable and the weatherman are not accurate enough half the time. Usually you have to book a long time in advance.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        That’s the problem with all of these things, so far in advance – nothing spur of the moment.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Exactly and if you wait til the last moment, it’s all filled up. If the dregs of the hurricane cause rain, that’s it – I’m not booking it again and for that matter, any other things next year (but the lavender and that’s a one-time trip for me). The weather is just too iffy. When is your harvest festival?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Mid-Sept. I hope it’s not too cool by then. Last year they had it late Sept. to coincide with the full (harvest) moon, but it was cold by then. You can already feel fall coming, and esp. the evenings getting dark sooner. It had better be a good meal for $40!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        And I hope your weather cooperates. I had some concern that we’d have a rainy weekend next week due to the end of the hurricane as that usually happens, but one meteorologist was asked that and he said we will not be impacted. Thought that was interesting as we usually are. I never thought about it when booking these few events … I hope it is nice and if not, that’s it, I’m done with doing it and the angst of worrying about weather, and working walks and events around bad weather, and now with this EEE virus, there is concern about going to any parks which are soggy, swampy or woodsy. I will be going more to Council Point Park until we get colder weather or stay on the paved pathways going forward. The sunflower event if you booked one day came with a donut, but I got the season pass so I could go any of the four days and also all through October to the pumpkin patch. It was not that much more to do that than book one single day … so I guess no donut. 🙂 Fellow blogger Laurie is going to a sunflower fest in Pennsylvania where she lives and they get a sunflower to take home. I think it would have been fun doing the harvest moon though – but chilly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        What is EEE virus? Never heard of it – is it something new. I am seriously behind on my medical reading, like one year’s worth of journals I keep stacking up and never open.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        That sounds like me with the AARP magazines … they come monthly … one month a magazine, the next month a newspaper – they pile up, year after year, and go unread. I say to myself “when I’m retired” but likely there are things to read about as to Medicare, etc. that should be read now. I thought maybe you knew about it as Ilene mentioned it the other day – she keeps her grass down low and weed whacks all along her fence as she is so afraid of ticks for her and the dogs. (She lives in a rural area in Kingsville.) She mentioned it the other day and it was on their news station.
        It is a mosquito-borne illness, worse than West Nile Virus, and can kill horses or make you very ill, even paralyzed. I never heard of it before this week and now it is all over the news. Here is some info: https://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,4579,7-186-76711_77442—,00.html

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Never heard of it, but yes encephalitis. Windsor is bad for ticks and lyme disease. Maybe because their weather is always warmer and rainier, as it’s the most southern part of Ont.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        It is scary and worse than West Nile which we also have here and for which several people have died in recent years, but more in the northern suburbs which are more rural. You have to drive out in the county to get rural areas and at least a 15-mile drive or more in Wayne County where I live. I won’t go to Crosswinds Nature Preserve and Marsh as they are likely a mosquito haven. Second year in a row I’ve not made it there but they had some flooding as well back in May/June so I’ve held off going. Here is the story on this girl: https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2019/08/28/eastern-equine-encephalitis-virus-eee-michigan/2140998001/
        I have a lot of photos stored up for posts so will stick with Council Point Park weekdays and do the weekend events I have planned. The sunflower farm would not be problematic (hopefully) and they pull wagons with tractors, not horses. The weather and its consequences have spun out of control. I likely am going to avoid any big parks until we have a hard freeze.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I read the article – that is scary. Have not seen any mention of it here in the papers, just the West Nile and Lyme Disease which are one of the reasons I didn’t go on the Plein Art trip a couple of weeks ago as the locale had too much bushy areas.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        See I assumed you knew about it since Ilene had mentioned it being so bad, and she said she heard it on the news. She is out in the country. She buys Skin-So-Soft by Avon and combines it was a mixture of other ingredients to apply to her and her dogs when she takes them tracking, as she doesn’t like using anything with Deet or other chemicals. This is really scary with this woman and I had not heard a peep about this EEE until her story. You were smart to cancel and I’d have not gone to Oakwoods had I known. We had rain most of the day today – it was sunny when I went out, five minutes later … rain and off/on all day and very gloomy. Always on a holiday weekend, but I’ve been good getting things done in the house. It was chilly this morning, just 60.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………congratulations on getting out to Oakwood Metro Park……………………….you took some awesome pre-autumn pictures………………………..I’ve never seen a Red-Spotted Purple butterfly before……………………cool

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      It was longer than my usual journeys Ann Marie. And such a perfect pre-Autumn day to do it. I’m glad you like the pictures and that was a first for me seeing that Red-Spotted Purple butterfly. It sure was cool and he liked to pose even more than Parker does. 🙂

      Like

  7. You had all kinds of gentle adventures! I enjoyed reading about your day.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. John says:

    Nice park with lots of nature. The picture of the butterfly is so beautiful Linda!😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked it John – you would enjoy walking in this park and it was a very beautiful day and almost chilly in the morning for late August. That butterfly stayed near me for the longest time and was enjoying basking in the sunshine.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. ruthsoaper says:

    Beautiful photos Linda. I recently saw a flutter-by with ragged wings like that and wondered why. How nice that you caught this one sunning. It is rare that they stay still long enough for me to get photos. I see many different types and I think I need to dust off our insect book and start identifying them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you Ruth – it was a beautiful park. I’ve never seen a blue butterfly so dug around to find info on it. I have heard that butterflies get torn wings from snagging them on rosebushes, or thorny thistles and it rips the wings and one blogger said birds might have pecked at it. It did not seem to hamper it in the least. I wish I’d seen the butterfly release and was kicking myself for not going there sooner. I looked online for this butterfly although I do have a moth and butterfly book from when I had the butterfly garden. Google makes me lazy: “blue butterfly in Michigan” and had my answer in a couple of seconds. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        Did you see a picture of it. My book shows the underside of the wings have a red spotted pattern, which explains it’s name.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Ruth – no, I haven’t looked yet in my moth and caterpillar book yet, as I have to dig it out since I put it away downstairs with my other books in a Rubbermaid tote after I lost my entire butterfly garden after the first polar vortex event. I still have the two butterfly houses in the garage – two wooden houses with slits for the butterflies to seek refuge on windy days or against predators.
        They are on tall stakes. I’m gong to take my book out before next year though, so I am more knowledgeable about butterflies. Like wildflowers, I only know a handful of wildflower names – same with butterflies. I just Googled around to find this butterfly’s underwings – very impressive and beautiful. So now I understand how it gets its name. See, it was opening and closing its wings a lot, but I was watching the top of it with the pretty blue. Even in the one picture I used with the wings up it was too dark to see the spots. Did you see in your book that this butterfly’s caterpillar stage resembles a bird dropping thus keeping it protected? http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/bfly/red-spotted_purple.htm

        Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        Have you thought about replanting a butterfly garden? I didn’t actually have time to read about that butterfly – just noticed the picture.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        If I do Ruth, it would be when I am retired and have more time to fiddle with a garden. Back when I had a garden in the backyard, it was the entire perimeter of the yard, and it was mostly perennial flowers, and I had three butterfly bushes – all these items died. I was pretty upset. I have lost all but one clematis, including one I bought 15 years ago as my mom loved that flower and it was huge, climbing up a trellis all the way up a tall pole where I had an ornamental log cabin bird feeder on top. Lost everything and all that is left now are roses and hydrangeas. I began my walking regimen at Labor Day 2011 and the following year I decided to buy silk flowers for the front and side yards which I planted in ornamental pots – that gave me more time to walk, less time to deadhead, weed, trim and water. When I worked on site, I spent 2 hours every morning before I left for work, working in the garden watering and keeping the annuals and perennials looking good, But I
        lost almost everything and didn’t have the heart to replant. It would cut into my walking regimen in the a.m. and since blogging interaction has picked up, I would have to mess with the flowers in the evening after I leave work. I don’t always leave work until 5:30-6:00 p.m., maybe later if I have a rush document to finish. I’ll make a decision after I retire, but that’s not for awhile yet. I will tell you that the butterfly bushes were a real magnet for Monarchs, Red Admirals, Tiger Swallowtails, Black Swallowtails, Painted Ladies … I was constantly outside with the camera taking pictures of them. I would get some of them again. They are not a lot of maintenance, just clip them occasionally as they grow wayward in a short amount of time..

        Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        It sounds like it was beautiful Linda and a hard loss. I certainly understand the time and commitment involved in maintenance. My prayer garden which could also be called a pollinator garden sometimes gets over grown with weeds. I could probably work it full time and it would still not be completely weed free. Before we had the farm we had a couple of butterfly bushes planted at the house but lost them one winter so I never planted any at the farm. We do have many plants (a lot of herbs) that attract butterflies and bees. My challenge is finding things that attract pollinators that the deer and rabbits don’t like.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        My mom liked bleeding heart plants and so I got three and the rabbits ate them. Thought I’d try the following year – same thing, so that was the end of that. The squirrels dug up all my father’s tulip bulbs the first year we were here and when we had tomato plants, the squirrels and birds pecked them, so that was the end of that. I thought the butterfly bushes were hardier and my neighbor had hers for years, never covered them, but one side was against the garage, so maybe that’s why hers were okay. Mine were the middle of the yard all together (two in one group were purple, one dark purple/reddish color on the other side) … I was very disappointed this happened. Not only the expense of losing flowers, but you spend time nurturing them for them to all die. I will make a decision though – when I have more time because then I can devote portions of the day to more than just walking, work and writing which is all I seem to accomplish anymore … housework and any yardwork has taken a backseat once blogging picked up. I never interacted with anyone on my blog, except for two non-blogging friends, the first 4 1/2 years, only since November of 2017 have I been “active” in WordPress.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Ally Bean says:

    This has been a fun adventure to read about and to see. It’s great to experience nature in doable chunks when walking through a park like this one. The photo of the red leaf is either encouraging [less humidity] or bittersweet [no more long evenings]. Can’t decide which– maybe both.

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Ally – I’m glad you liked that adventure. It was a beautiful park and so much to see. I saw a lot of kids with parents at this Metropark, some hiking, some riding bicycles. They have a nice paved bike trail that is 30 miles long and you can connect to several Metroparks in the area. The red leaf – yes, too red for this early in the year, but after reading the “Old Farmer’s Almanac” and our SE Michigan prediction, I’m sorry I complained about the heat and humidity (7 major snowstorms, one or two Polar Vortex events and a late Spring with Winter-like weather extending into April – ugh).

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Prior... says:

    Loved this – and the title – oh my – you nailed it – fall feel

    Liked by 1 person

  12. So much nature, just beautiful Linda! There must be a lot of trees down everywhere because that was the first thing I commented on at our parks. It’s amazing how similar the parks all are.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      It was a beautiful trek Diane. I was surprised about how many trees were down in this Park. At Lake Erie Metropark, I’ve not been on any of the woodsy trails in 2019 as that park has had lakeshore flooding since Spring. There are plenty of paved paths to walk on or just walk on the grass instead (but then you have to worry about ticks). This park had lots of trees, and all sizes … that one picture of all the trees left standing where the others of the same size were on the ground, gave me kind of an eerie feeling. I wondered if it was the winds because they didn’t look damaged by disease?

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Eliza says:

    Awesome!!!! Glad I got to read through this.
    Love, light and glitter

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I saw a shelter someone made. thirteenth from the bottom.

    Like

    • lindasschaub says:

      I just looked at that Wayne- you mean for a person who is homeless and staying there? Or maybe a Boy Scout survival exercise? We have had some horrible wind storms this year so it surprised me some of these piles of wood were so neatly piled or arranged, so maybe that explains it. I wonder what the purpose of the igloo-shaped bark structure was for? Tomorrow night we have some severe weather and possible tornadic conditions predicted. That is odd as peak tornado season is in June, July and sometimes in August, rarely in August. Something else to have angst over as if the Winter 2019-2020 predictions were not enough.

      Like

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