A brrrrrrisk walk.

I mentioned in my recent post “The Faces of Winter” that after what seemed like an eternity, I returned to Council Point Park five days after our first major snowstorm of the new year and decade.

I am attaching Saturday’s post here, because there were some issues with Reader and that post failed to show up in some people’s feeds, including mine. If you missed it, you can click here.

Last Wednesday, with much trepidation, I laced up my hiking boots, hoping the City had plowed the asphalt perimeter path before the freezing rain arrived and put down an icy glaze. Late Saturday morning, there had been a small window of opportunity when plain rain, and a 35-degree (+1 C) temperature, erased all traces of snow on the concrete. I was happy to see the Department of Public Services had seized this opportunity just like me.

It was bitter cold with a stiff breeze, making for a brrrrrrisk walk. Suddenly, I realized in my haste to get outside, I forgot my gloves with the flip-up fingers to use with the camera. My regular gloves were way too bulky, so I slipped them off. I had instant frozen fingers, so I had to move quickly and get my photos done to let my red fingers warm up before the cuteness overload that would soon join me for peanuts on the perimeter path.

I paused to take a shot of the fork in the two paths. I usually take the right fork each time when setting out on the walking path. The first year I walked at this Park I took a picture at the beginning of the trail, at this exact fork, for each season, then made one collage picture of the four seasons. I intend to do that again in 2020 (assuming we can tell the seasons apart, since our weather has been so wacky of late).

I saw yellow snow in several places, so I knew someone else had been to the Park (yes, a pooch, not a walker, as there were paw prints in the snow). I met one of the other walkers who, like me, was equally pleased to see how clear the pathways were and told me he had already fallen once, after he slid and wiped out on some glare ice hidden beneath a dusting of snow. Yikes! Perhaps I was feeling overconfident with those boots’ thick treads and the seemingly clear path. I promised myself to be wary of any tricky ice patches going forward.

The landscape was pretty blah with snow everywhere.

Two squirrels appeared in different parts of the donut area inside the loop and vast expanse of the snowy park.

This little guy looked like a tiny black dot in a sea of white.

That black squirrel climbed up onto a low branch and looked equally small in the big tree.

The Ecorse Creek was frozen over, covered by a dusting of snow in spots, and just plain ice in others.

Across the snowy donut area of the walking loop, I saw Harry the Heron in fishing posture on the cement landing. I wondered how he thought he’d catch a fish, but perhaps there was a hole in the ice? I hoped he’d stay put until I made it over to that side, likely awhile, once I was waylaid by the squirrels.

I hadn’t traveled too far on the pathway when the first squirrel (one of those two tiny dots pictured above) came leaping over the snow piles, skidding to a stop by my feet, then the other one scampered over. I dropped some peanuts and the pair scurried away to enjoy them.

Squirrel radar was definitely in place, because within a few minutes, at least six more squirrels had wandered by and settled in to munch on the peanuts I had placed nearby. In my mind, I imagine the squirrels letting out a squeal of delight from their cozy nests. Do they utter an Alvin the Chipmunk-type noise that translates to “yay, Linda is here” as opposed to “the nutty lady has arrived” … I’ll never know since I don’t speak “squirrel”.

This photo shows the Gang of Eight.

Soon a dozen squirrels surrounded me. I figured they might not have left their nests since the past Friday, given the smorgasbord of wet weather, then the brutal Arctic-like chill that cloaked most of Southeast Michigan.

I took a ton of pictures that morning – here are a few of my favorites of my furry friends below.

You see this black squirrel (maybe the one formerly known as Midnight) enjoyed some peanuts, then, because old habits never die, he took off to bury one in the snow.

This is Stubby, easily identifiable by that shortened, white-tipped tail.

Stubby is at a disadvantage when the Winter winds blow – compare how this squirrel’s long and furry tail partially shields him from the elements, in contrast to Stubby’s tail.

And let’s not forget Parker, who stationed himself in the only grassy area with no snow, which is pretty smart when you are not wearing boots.

Well, I tore myself away from this idyllic scene to finish up my walk. I intended to walk at least three miles, the equivalent of three times on Loop #1.

Harry wasn’t harried at all!

Through the bare bushes, I was happy to see Harry was still hanging around, his skinny body poised at the edge of the Ecorse Creek banks. My picture is a bit blurry as I had to peer through the bushes, but shows how he paused and I imagined a thought bubble over his head said “should I stay or should I go?”

He looked both ways and decided to go for it. Atta boy Harry!

Maybe the rumbling in Harry’s stomach won over any anxiety about traversing this narrow, ice-covered passage, because off he went, plodding confidently with his big feet.

He strode across the frozen surface, pausing to peck at something sticking out of the ice.

Then he continued on, looking around occasionally, while striking a nice pose against the snowy background and creating a pale reflection on the icy surface.

At the end of my trek it appeared a pale sun was peeking through the clouds and I was surprised to see my faint shadow as I finished up my third time around Loop #1.

As I headed to the car after an enjoyable trek, with pink cheeks and still red and frozen fingers, and, what I hoped would be a treasure trove of photos in the camera, my own stomach began rumbling since my oatmeal was long gone in the toes of my hiking boots.

As I drove home, I decided that perhaps snow and Winter MAY have a few redeeming qualities after all and I should re-think my aversion to this season.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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56 Responses to A brrrrrrisk walk.

  1. I particularly liked the photos of Harry and his reflection. It was great to go along your walk with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Anne – glad you enjoyed tagging along. It was gray and cold, but the snow and the activity at the Park made it really enjoyable. I was happy Harry took his time and seemed more stable on his feet this trip across. I was surprised his reflection was so clear given the gray day.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. ruthsoaper says:

    Hi Linda. I’m glad you are finding at least some days that are safe to walk at the park. It seems like we have fallen into a routine of storms coming in on the weekend. All your friends were sure happy to see you. 🙂 You did a great job photographing Harry’s trip across the ice. Only 51 day ’til spring. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Ruth – it is a strange pattern isn’t it? They are predicting still another small snow event this weekend Friday into Saturday. Hopefully it does not amount to much. I was happy to read that we may not get a Polar Vortex event this year, though the expert seemed to insinuate that it could always happen in March, but it did not seem real likely for February. That makes me feel better. I’m glad you liked the Harry shots – he seemed happier and more confident on this trip across the Creek. Getting to the Park to feed the squirrels was not a sure thing due to the snowstorm, so I was happy to get down there finally. This morning I went out to walk, and in the time it took to get my coat and hiking boots on, it started flurrying like crazy. I cannot wait for Spring – that is for sure!

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        This morning on channel 4 they said that real winter weather (cold and snow) will be returning 1 week from today. We’ll see, eh?

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Ruth – when I left on my walk this morning, the weatherman was crowing about his good Winter weather report beginning next week and what will the Groundhog say? Then I returned and I heard about snow Tuesday, likely that afternoon – the weather is just crazy isn’t it? I’m ready for it to stay cold and dry – that would suit me just fine. Was Paul Gross saying that prediction for next week, or Brandon Roux?

        Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        It was Brandon Roux. Yes we really do need to dry out for a while. So sunshine would be nice as well. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I have followed Paul Gross for years on social media – I do not have TV as I cancelled my cable a decade ago and just watch news online or hear it on WWJ. I have a tiny digital TV but it often freezes and is useless to see pictures, but the audio is good. I have not even turned it on in ten years. It was in my mom’s room and I bought it for her when she was confined to bed. Paul Gross now does mornings with Brandon Roux all the time – he posted that he was going to be a “regular” on the morning show around the end of the year. Now I hear it will be 50 on Monday, Tuesday gets colder and possible snow, then as you said snow on Wednesday. What a shame!

        Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        I told my husband that in a normal year this would be considered our January thaw but I don’t think we have had enough freezing yet to have a “thaw”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        No, I don’t think we have either, but the ground is frozen as I saw squirrels trying to bury their peanuts and could not dig with their claws and they were frustrated. In Monroe they had slick roads this morning and a semi ran off the road – I planned on doing errands and when I went out it was flurrying but soon it was sleeting. Got one errand done and came home – didn’t want to deal with freezing rain if it came. Looks like Monday will be wonderful, then rain/freezing rain Tuesday, then snow. It is such a shame since everything is all cleared up again. I saw on the Accuweather site that Lake Erie is way above normal levels so there will be flooding in Toledo for sure – likely Lake Erie Metropark will be impacted for the third year in a row … I took pictures last year, and not used them yet, of the park benches sitting out in Lake Erie due to shoreline flooding! It did not subside until Summer. Not liking the “new norm” for weather at all.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Joni says:

    They must have been overjoyed to see you! Love the photos of Harry and his reflection – just beautiful. And the red red cardinal. And the park looks good with all that snow. Winter would be pretty to look at if it wasn’t so cold!

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      I think they hadn’t eaten since the Friday before Joni … they probably hate to leave the comfort of their nest and nowhere to forage. They curl up in the nests all together to keep warm. I like the cardinal too – same cardinal as with the squirrel – a second later, the squirrel was up close and personal. 🙂 I think I would not be adverse to Winter if the snow stayed on the grass and not on sidewalks, pathways, streets – in a perfect world I guess. I would even deal with the cold if there was just no snow.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Winter has its own beauty. Not as colorful as the other months but with snow, it isn’t all harsh brown/gray.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I agree Kate – yesterday most of the snow had melted after three solid days of rain. This morning I was all set to go out and opened the door and flurrying like crazy. The snow does have beauty though – it’s always peaceful looking.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. hahaha okay, I give up. You mentioned the Gang of Eight (squirrels)… I only counted 6 adorable brown ones LOL, I think I need new glasses. BTW, the Great Blue Heron, Harry, is just so amazingly beautiful. What a treat to your soul and your mind. Thanks for sharing this paradise with us, Linda.

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Martha – it is so peaceful, it really is, and so difficult to believe how this park is along a creek, but basically right in the middle of a residential neighborhood in our City. I lived here 47 years before I even heard of this park and it is just one mile away from my house – amazing isn’t it? Harrry was graceful crossing the icy Creek. I was surprised his reflection was so clear given the gray day. I will help you find the squirrels Martha – there are two squirrels that are right at the right-hand side of the perimeter path, on the asphalt path, but against the snow. Look closely as they are almost “hugging” the edge, but each one is near a little pile of snow. They look like “blobs” – there were many more squirrels there, but I couldn’t get them all into the picture.

      Like

  6. Eliza says:

    It didn’t show up then. It looks awesome!!!! I’m glad you reposted it.
    🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad I mentioned this in today’s post. It was frustrating as it didn’t show up in Reader and the only people who got it were subscribers and it was not the whole post, just a reference line, so they found it on the blog site instead of Reader. I wanted to ensure people saw it as it was Part 1 and the snowmen were just so cute as well. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    I am glad to read that the cause of the yellow snow was ” a pooch, not a walker”! 🙂 Linda, I am so sad to be driving northward toward winter again. The photos you took are beautiful, but I was spoiled by the warm Florida sun. Oh, well, back to the cold snowy north!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Laurie, I feel I must have the oddball statement that keeps the “Whimsy” part of my blog title alive. 🙂 There was lots of it, on high snow piles so a large dog evidently. Yes, the snow shots make it seem beautiful, but snowy and cold are not my first choice either. Have a safe trip home Laurie.

      Like

  8. Rebecca says:

    I think your snow is beautiful. We’ve had such a mild winter so far with no snow. Amazing how frozen the creek is. Very nice photos of the heron and squirrels!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      No snow – you have lucked out! We have had two snow events – one on November 11th and this one a week ago Saturday, but we’ve had many bouts of rain and freezing rain which has not been so good – usually we get that kind of weather in March. It still looked pretty in this picture, just five days after the 5 inch snowstorm. We had rain beginning this past Saturday and when I was there yesterday, most of the snow was gone – not from any warm-up, just the incessant rain. Yes, frozen solid again and Harry had no problem meandering across it to the other side. Glad you liked the photos Rebecca.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………………One of my winter delights is watching geese walking on the ice………………………so I love seeing Mr. Harry the Heron walking on the icy creek…………..thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Me too Ann Marie – glad you liked Harry’s pictures. There were no geese that day, nor ducks, just Harry … so that made it even nicer to see him be the center of attention on center ice, like he was the “star” of the show. He seemed much more confident than last time when he took tinier steps. Monday it was a little icy at the Park from all the runoff from the snow which had gone across the path and made it just a little slick and I ended up walking on the snow next to the path most of my walk.

      Like

  10. Mighty cold compared to Western Oregon where we are mighty wet. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Bryan – that is what I am hearing from another blogger in Oregon. She likes hiking around Mt. Hood and says it is very soggy these days. We got soggier when we had three days of rain on the weekend – next week we get to 50 degrees! Very unusual and I’m not complaining at all about that!

      Like

  11. Ally Bean says:

    “Atta boy Harry!” for sure. What a great photo. It’s so cold where you are. If I were a squirrel I’d be darned glad to see you, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Ally – yes Harry had no problems this time and showed confidence making that trek across the Creek. Those squirrels were happy after four solid days of horrible weather and it was still brutally cold that day as well. I suspect they stay up in their nests the entire time as they saw no reason to come down – no peanuts and nothing to forage.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. It looks so peaceful and cold! I’d love a little snow for a change of pace. We’ve had only one day so far in January where it didn’t rain. Great view of Harry the Heron!

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      It was peaceful because the snow muffled all the street sounds and where I was is far enough from the residential area so it was very quiet. It was beautiful, but very cold that day – all the rain last weekend has melted most of the snow and icy areas and it looks nothing like it did. I was lucky that Harry meandered around the top of the Creek long enough to sneak some photos of him – he usually bolts, but I suspect he cannot take off and go airborne when he lifts off from the ice. I hope the rain is not hampering you feeling 100% again

      Liked by 1 person

      • No, I don’t think the rain had anything to do with my cold. Just bad luck being near someone who was contagious. This too shall pass! Hopefully that’s it for me for a long while. I’ve never seen a heron on ice, but watched one take off in the sand at the beach once. He just started running and lifted off. But somehow it would seem more difficult on ice due to the slippery surface.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, you’re right. I’m going out to run some errands tomorrow morning – I try to do all my errands in one fell swoop. They switched the forecast to having snow both weekend days (minimal) and maybe sizable next week by Wednesday. Time to make a foray out and hope I don’t run into any sick people. The herons are beautiful as they take off and in flight, you’d not believe the wingspan since their wings don’t look that big when they are at rest. I don’t think Harry was aware I was there most of the time as he was plodding along taking his good ol’ sweet time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Good luck on your outing Linda! I hope the snow forecast is wrong. Herons are beautiful and graceful.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes they are Sabine – they look like statues when waiting for the right moment to get their next fish. I am disheartened about the snow coming next Tuesday/Wednesday.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Sandra J says:

    It is hard to find good photos in winter at times. But your heron pics are so nice, with his reflection in the ice. Very nice.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Sandra – this heron was not as hesitant to cross this time, taking his time and meandering along to poke at the item stuck in the ice. Last time he had a difficult time to keep upright at times. I was surprised there was so much reflection as it was a very gray day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I can’t even get close to the heron’s around the river. That is nice you could see him so well. They are so pretty I think.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I think they are pretty too – I really don’t think he saw me watching him as I was not in his direct view … he was graceful as he walked across. I wish the light had been better, but I was surprised on that gray day you could see his reflection. In the Summer months, he fishes every day from the cement ledge – he sees me coming around the corner and bolts, making a horrible screeching noise.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        That is what they do here, when I was in Florida they were hanging around the fishing pier. They were 3 feet in front of me and did not hardly move. It was so amazing. I am going back there again.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I was in Florida years ago and don’t remember the herons, but I remember the egrets that were sitting up in the trees that had all the moss hanging off the branches. It looked funny to see this spot of white in all the green moss. I never saw egrets wading or fishing in the swamp, just up high.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        Good Morning Linda, I could not stay awake last night. I do love all the birds in Florida, by the ocean anyway. There was not hardly any in the town we were in. Not even little birds. Lots of lizards and ants, that was about it. But by the water, the brown Pelicans were just amazing and so goofy looking.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I miss the long walks at the water and I hope by Sunday I can get out and to the River and see some shore birds. I was there last year when we had a polar vortex (may even be in 2018?) and I saw the waves that were frozen – it was so amazing to me. I may go to Elizabeth Park as well but my pictures would be similar to the crowd of squirrels and the birds at the bird feeding area like I wrote about today (it was a little tribute post at the end to my mom as she loved birds and passed away ten years ago today). I may just concentrate on the two parks by the River. The problem is they are not really parks, just board walks and not more than a long city block. Last year I saw an eagle in a tree, but that was the only time and I go there a lot in the Summer. I will make sure to see my squirrels at my regular park to fuel them up for the upcoming week of frozen precip starting Tuesday … a one-day warm-up.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        Where my house is in Iowa, there is a bike path right out front that leads to a small city pond that I walk to a lot. But I have to drive or ride a bike to get to the river. Not much going on at the pond this time of year. But it is still a nice walk.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I don’t expect to see much there on Sunday – there are Mute Swans sometimes, but that depends … the best are the ducks. There are lots of ducks there. At Elizabeth Park and Heritage Park, each place has someone feeding the ducks. A man brings a huge bag of corn every morning and throws it on the grass at Coan Lake and they all come to meet him and feast. I took a picture of him feeding the ducks one morning. At Elizabeth Park, I may have told you about the couple that give a huge bucket of corn to the ducks there – the big white Pekin ducks are so friendly and nestle against their legs and walk up the ramp to the van to find THEIR corn and sample it before it is thrown. I like stories like that – those ducks would be disappointed if no one showed up to give them treats.

        Like

      • Sandra J says:

        That is so nice that people feed them. Because I have wondered what they eat when there is snow on the ground. Seems like they used to fly south for the winter but now they seem to stay around.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I wonder too – I have taken oyster crackers for them in the past … I used to take bread and throw it out, but after I read about angel wing I stopped doing that. I was there with the ice floes and a woman had a large bucket of birdseed and threw it on an ice floe for them to eat – I would not think ordinary bird seed would be enough to satisfy their hunger. There are a lot of aquatic plants in the Detroit River. When I took that first little Clinton cruise in the Summer of 2018, they had a gizmo that we could see underwater and all the wild celery and other plant life – we were told that this is the main staple for ducks, geese and swans. At the River, I watched a duck fishing and caught a fish, but had trouble swallowing it live.

        Like

      • Sandra J says:

        That is good to know about the plant life in the water. I saw a white goose hanging out with other geese a few weeks ago. I am guessing it was a snow goose. But it was pretty plump, I am not sure if it was wild or farm fed. But very pretty

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I have never seen a snow goose – that sounds pretty. These Pekin ducks are snow white and very big – I’d never seen one before going to Elizabeth Park. They are much bigger than the other ducks. I saw one gray goose but never saw any more.

        Like

  14. Tazzie says:

    Oh please don’t apologise for photographs of snow. LOL it was so hot here in Tasmania that looking at your photos cooled me off. I love the black squirrel, and Harry is magnificent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      OK and I will share snow if you’ll let me – ours is now melted but we’re getting more next Wednesday but a near-record warm day next Monday of 50 degrees (10C) – it’s a shame to bring snow into the picture. How interesting about our different climates and how they are the reverse. I had a childhood friend who moved to Australia when we were both 10 and we kept in touch and even as a kid, I marveled how she would be melting away as we were freezing. Glad you like these little critters – the black squirrels are the same species as the gray squirrels, different pigments in their fur which is amazing to me … they are glossy and I hope you can tell from the pictures – they are beautiful, as is Harry … graceful isn’t he?

      • Tazzie says:

        It is your blog you share as you desire.
        How lovely to have kept in touch with a childhood friend.
        I think Christmas be the perfect example of the weirdness of north-south hemispheres. Australia being settled by British and influenced by UK and USA sees so much of Santa in the thick heavy suit, snow and reindeer. where as we are in Heat and I love that now more and more Australian images, such as a Santa wearing red speedos, riding a surf board and others.

        Oh squirrels are awesome, I think they are intelligent, and so cute. I could see the different colours in their coats, and I was amazed. Harry is graceful. Wonderful photos.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’ll be happy to send some snow along for you to enjoy Tazzie. 🙂 Yes, Vanessa was sad to leave her friends in Oakville, Ontario as her father was transferred to Australia for his job, then we moved to the States not too long afterward and I had to leave my little circle of friends (who all lived on the same block and we were the same age). I was ten when we moved here in 1966 and I am still a Canadian citizen.

        I do love those little squirrels and their antics – they are very intelligent and know that cute looks and sitting on haunches guarantees a few more peanuts. They are savvy like that. They are beautiful with their colors. I saw the poor fellow with mange today – he ran away. He is very skittish, more so than the others – I am working on him to come closer to me. Harry is very graceful – he was kind to take his time going across the Creek and not bolt as he usually does.

        Like

  15. I’m so inspired to watch your walks while it’s still too cold (at least to me). Great photos – I really like the ones of Harry and his reflections. He looked like he was performing for the Icecapades! Glad the path was clear and that you got some sun too!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you Shelley – it was very cold that morning and my mission was really just to feed the squirrels as we had four days of bad weather (wet snow, freezing rain, rain, then three days of brutal cold), but I always have the camera and decided to make use of it – no gloves for those shots either. Brrr, my poor fingers. They did a good job on the pathway. I don’t think Harry saw me because he just kind of ambled along and did not freak out as he usually does and bolt. He was graceful and seemed to be at ease this time – maybe the ice surface was rougher and not glare ice?

      Liked by 1 person

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