Gallivantin’ on Grosse Ile.

On Sunday March 15th we had a spectacular sunrise, and, while I waited for the sky to lighten up and the morning to unfold, I pondered on that day’s destination.

I’ve wanted to try Crosswinds Marsh and Nature Preserve in New Boston for a couple of years now. But, it seems there was always something holding me back – no, not the worry of getting lost, (even though I finally bought a paper map after getting lost in the boonies of Belleville enroute to the Sunflower Festival).

Since following Crosswinds on social media and reading comments on their site, as well as from other walkers, I have learned this 1,050-acre venue consisting of marshes, meadows and forest wetlands, has had its share of issues from torrential flooding to ticks and it is considered a hubbub of mosquitoes once our hot and humid days arrive. Last year Michiganders worried about mosquito-borne issues like West Nile virus and EEE virus … so did I really want to go there and risk a bite? (Who knew that 2020 would find us worrying about a bigger virus than ever before?)

I figured I’d give it a go since we’d not had rain, and mosquitoes and ticks may still be sleeping, but, after mapping out my directions, at the last minute, I changed my mind and decided to go gallavantin’ on Grosse Ile instead.

First, I stopped for a few hours at Elizabeth Park, hoping to get some more birds-hanging-out-at-the-feeder photos, so that trek will be fodder for a future post.

It was an afternoon of alpacas and “winged things”.

I made several trips to Grosse Ile last year. There was a 5K Memorial Run/Walk, a lighthouse tour and a few unsuccessful trips to the sticks to look for deer (only to see two bucks walking down the middle of the street while I was driving, and could not stop and capture their images).

But those trips paled in comparison to my visit to the Gibralter Bay Alpaca Farm in the Fall of 2018. I spent a few hours around the perimeter of the farm taking pictures of those fuzzy critters, then speaking with Gail, who co-owns the farm with her husband Richard. This is the post if you’d care to read it.

I sent that blog post to Gail and Richard via Facebook, then we had a back-and-forth about when the alpacas would be sheared as I wanted to see them at their fuzziest. Richard said late April, and since he is a beekeeper, he also invited me to stop and watch him taking the honey off the hives. Well both ideas piqued my interest, but with so many torrential rainy weekends in April 2019, I never made it back there.

I figured if I wanted to see fuzzy alpacas, I’d better hurry. Unfortunately, the Grosse Ile free bridge (pictured up top) is closing for repairs April 30th through October. The toll bridge charges $5.00 for a round trip to the Island and I haven’t a clue where that bridge is. And if this April was anything like the Spring of 2018 and 2019 … best get while the gettin’s good.

So, off I went to see the cutie pies and explore a little more of Grosse Ile.

I parked out front of Gibralter Bay Alpaca Farm and stepped out of the car. In my peripheral vision I saw a flurry of dark brown feathery bodies run by. I squinted from the sun and took a closer look to see turkeys running around the side of the barn. “Well, cool” I thought as I’d never seen turkeys before, wild or otherwise. I grabbed the camera and just then a woman appeared out of nowhere and asked if I had come to visit the farm. “Yes” I told her, “but just the perimeter area to look at the alpacas, like I did last time.” She told me the farm was closed due to the Coronavirus and worries about accidental contamination of the virus onto the alpacas’ long fibers and making them sick. I told her I was healthy, but I understood and didn’t intend to get too close to the alpacas as I didn’t want to get spit on. She smiled and said “okay then” and I added “I want to see those turkeys too!” She told me they were wild turkeys and to be careful. (Yikes!)

The turkeys evidently disappeared by the time I grabbed the camera and was ready to take pictures, so likely, if I hadn’t lingered as long at Elizabeth Park, I might have gotten a few shots of them.

Where the boys are.

“Where the boys are” is not just an old movie about some college girls’ quest to find boys during Spring break in Florida circa 1960, nor is it about the Connie Francis song by the same title. Step back 60 years and look at Spring Break then ….

Oh, I believe I digressed a bit. Where the boys are is in an enclosure to the left of the barn – this is where the male alpacas roam during the day. And, as I strode over to the fence, their curiosity got the better of them. In fact, one alpaca even interrupted his roll in the hay on this sunshiny day to inspect me. Well, did I pass muster? Just in case of a spit-attack, (and keeping with my promise to stand a few paces back), we had a bit of a stare-down, then he plopped onto the ground with his buddy to enjoy the sunny afternoon.

I got eye-balled by a few more of the alpacas as they sized me up, all with curious looks as if to say “hey, that wool cap with the pompom you’re wearing … did it come from me?”

The fact is, when the alpacas are sheared in the Spring, each one’s curly locks are bagged with their name, then all bags are sent to a processing plant and skeins of wool are returned, each bearing that alpaca’s name. The wool is pure, devoid of color or dyes and is sold in the farm’s gift shop. Knitters assemble for the gift shop’s knitting club and churn out items that are also for sale at that same store.

Here are some more of the boys’ pictures:

While admiring and taking photos of these inquisitive creatures, Richard, one of the owners, came over and introduced himself.

We chitchatted a little and I mentioned I was the one who had written the blog post and he remembered me. So, I got a little tour of the alpaca farm and we stepped over to the other side of the barn to visit the female alpacas, a/k/a “the girls” … Richard gave a whistle and a pack of alpacas immediately came running over to the fence.

This is “Charm” the leader of the female alpacas and she is front and center here.

The alpacas quickly snugged up to the fence, clustering around Richard as I stood a little bit back; others queued up perhaps for a pat or a treat of baby carrots. I learned that this was why this time, and my last visit, the alpacas came to the fence, thinking that I had a treat (not because of my smiling and friendly face).

Here are some of the pictures of female alpacas in and around their pen.

Richard offered me a quick tour around the property. I lamented a little over missing the wild turkeys and he said they show up every day as he feeds them grain, so they gather around him, sometimes hopping onto his truck around the usual feeding time. He looked near some brush where they sometimes hang out, but no turkeys (hmm, kind of rude to just eat and run guys!)

While touring the outskirts of the property, we were very close to the Grosse Ile Airport. There is a helicopter flight school and we watched one coming in for a landing, as well as a few planes.

I told Richard I always wanted to go to the Grosse Ile Airport when the Goodyear Blimp was in town for the Grand Prix. I saw the blimp up close and personal as we Downtown Detroit office workers leaned out office building windows to wave “hello” during the inaugural Grand Prix event when it was held right in downtown proper in 1982. The Goodyear Blimp would stay at this airport and travel to/from the Grand Prix each of the three days for Free Prix Day, time trials and race day. I’d see the blimp hovering high above the neighborhood as it made its way to Detroit on the weekend afternoons, then returning at night lit up like a Christmas tree. There are only smaller blimps that come to this hangar now unfortunately.

After scouring the skies for helicopters and small planes, and taking a handful of photos, we headed back to the farm. After we parted, I decided to walk the half-mile to the airport and explore some more.

There was really not much to see there to be honest; more was happening in the air, but I saw this plane and got up close to it.

My parting shot was this sign which grabbed my attention.

But wait – there were more “winged things” I saw that day.

I’d already seen turkeys and whirlybirds, but a few more birds awaited me, like this one:

I could hardly wait to get home to see what mystery bird of prey my camera had hopefully captured, thinking I might be crossing hawk off my photo bucket list. I took about ten pictures – this was the best shot. I have omitted the blurry shot of the bright-red head of a turkey vulture.

I also saw a few Song Sparrows along the way before I finally called it a day.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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61 Responses to Gallivantin’ on Grosse Ile.

  1. Eliza says:

    Sounds like you had a good day… I’m glad you went then and actually got to see them this year instead of having to wait until next.

    I hope this post was scheduled and not posted in the middle of the night!

    Love, light, and glitter

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a fun day and a beautiful weather day, unlike this morning which we had some snow last night, but it did not stick to cement and now it’s raining. We may be required to stay at home – awaiting an 11:00 a.m. news conference by the Governor and hoping it does not impact walking for me … it has not impacted walking in other states … well so far anyway.

      Yes, I did this post over the weekend and scheduled it to publish early … I am an early bird, though I slept in this morning since I was up late trying to catch up here on WordPress and I knew I wouldn’t be walking, nor shoveling, just grumbling. 🙂

      Stay safe Ellie. Love, light and glitter back across the Pond.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Eliza says:

        Ahh thats okay then. You know, I’m still in bed and you’re up. I better get up!!

        Love, light, and glitter

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Ha ha – but I slept in a little later today because I went to bed at midnight three nights in a row and I keep hearing how you should eat properly, stay hydrated and get lots of rest. I am going to try and abide by that tonight. Was a little busy at work today, but I don’t think my boss will be in at work for a while (not supposed to be anyway) as we have that “stay inside” order now. Glad I can go to the park still though. Love, light and glitter back at you.

        Like

      • Eliza says:

        I hope you got a good night sleep…
        Love, light, and glitter

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! What a day! I liked the photos of the alpacas.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this Anne. It was fun and a long day – I put in about six miles last Sunday. I love the expressions of the alpacas. I came here to get the link to send to Richard and Gail. We had snow, but not sticking to the cement. And it’s raining a little now. We are expected to go to stay-at-home here in Michigan at an 11:00 a.m. news conference, but unknown whether it is mandated or voluntary yet.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’d be interested in the announcement and how it will affect you. We are such stay-at-homes that our lives are not impacted very much so far.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am really a stay-at-home person too and I only started going to the big parks on weekends a couple of years ago – before that, I went just to Council Point Park every day and rarely to Heritage or Elizabeth Park. It’s only been since I’ve been including more photos in the blog that I expanded my horizons.

        Well what our Governor is calling a “stay home and stay safe” order will go into effect at midnight tonight. We may go to banks, gas stations, grocery stores and pharmacies and we may go for take-out food. They closed bars and restaurants except take-out last Monday – I think they worried about St. Patrick’s Day gatherings. All other non-essential businesses are closed – there is not a fine for going into a businesses, but they cannot operate and have people going there. We are allowed to go to parks and it’s encouraged – the 13 Metroparks are waiving their fee so people have somewhere to go. I understand from a photographer I follow on Twitter that her Metropark is now crowded. She makes videos every mornings of the birds eating seeds and peanuts from her hand, but this is not happening now due to so many people. It is never usually crowded when I go on Saturdays or Sundays (I buy a year-long pass for any of the 13 Metroparks). So, I am going to continue to walk like usual and I’m not sure what happens as to work going forward. Since I don’t watch sports I’m not affected that way – many are upset that everything has been cancelled.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. This looks like such a fun day – alpacas are honestly so cute!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Fred Bailey says:

    As usual, I enjoyed my walk in the park with you. Thanks. Fred

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you enjoyed it Fred. I discovered a small nature area while there last weekend. I looked for it before but could not find it, but saw it as I drove home from the alpaca farm and airport. I hope to get back there before April 30th when they close the free bridge. Late last year there were some problems with the free bridge and it was suddenly closed down about 5-6 days and the back-ups were pretty bad to get on the island using the other bridge.

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  5. Ally Bean says:

    Love the photos of the alpacas. Such attitude. Charm is well named, isn’t she?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the alpaca photos Ally. They are so curious and I love the quizzical look they give you. If you pass muster, and are without treats, they go back to eating grass or rolling in the hay in their enclosure. I thought Charm was well named too – that sweet girl led the pack over to the fence after just one whistle

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Sandra J says:

    I love the alpacas. They are so colorful, I do not know a lot about them. Such an interesting animal. I thought your one bird looked like a turkey vulture. I have seen a couple of them around here also. A wonderful outing today, I enjoyed it very much. I just read your post now, it is a little later in the morning. I had to go out and get a couple photos of the new snow on all the trees. It is all gone now though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked them Sandra. They are cute and very inquisitive. When I was there in the warmer weather, the male alpacas were out in the pasture area and I was able to roam alongside the fence and they ran over to check me out, then went right back to eating.

      As to the bird, I was hopeful it was some unique hawk or even an eagle and it was very sunny so I was essentially shooting blindly into the sky. That is the second time I’ve come home eager to see what bird it was and it was a turkey vulture. Oh well, better than a stick in the eye as that expression goes – I wish I’d seen the turkeys – they were huge!

      We had snow here too, a couple of inches, but only on the lawns and bushes and then it rained and it was gone. My kind of snowfall!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        They say spring snows are full of nitrogen, so it is good for the ground. They never last long but it sure was pretty out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I didn’t know that – yes our snow was fleeting. We had snow a few years ago in early November. The predicted flurries and we had heavy snow … it was gorgeous and I got out and took some photos. Then by noon, it was all melted, even though it was fairly heavy, but we had had warmish weather.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        This snow the other day, when it first started the snow flakes were so big, I think the biggest I have ever seen. And yet they floated down so gracefully. I just sat by the window and watched it for awhile. So pretty.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I like to watch that too – almost like a snow globe. Then it covers very quickly. This snow vanished – very nice too. I went to the Park on Christmas Day once and it was not snowing when I got there and halfway through the first loop, and wearing walking shoes, not boots, as no snow was expected. I was far from the start of the pathway and the snow came down fast, slickened up the pathway and by the time I got to the parking lot (didn’t drive, but have a one-mile trip home from the Park) I was soaking wet and my hood of my coat collected a massive amount of snow in record time. The roads were slick too. I was happy to be home – it kept snowing and several inches were put down by the time I got home.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        It can happen so quick, the heavy snow falls and rain. This last snow was left about an inch of snow stuck to everything, like the branches on the tree. It was strange to look at. You mention snow globes. I love those. My sister bought me one a long time ago, it was just beautiful. Sparkles of course and a nice scene in it. My cat knocked it off of the table and it broke. I have not found one like it since. But I keep looking.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, they are so beautiful and peaceful to look at. Was it a Christmas snow globe Sandra? I get e-mails from a place called The Grommet. I never have bought anything from them, but they advertised snow globes so I just searched – they have some different ones:
        https://www.thegrommet.com/products/coolsnowglobes-modern-snow-globe

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I had never heard of that store, they have all sorts of items, I will look more closely at it. It was a Christmas globe. I had it for so long, my cat is really persistent these days. When she wants something she gets your attention by knocking things off of counters. So I keep an eye on that stuff now. Thank you for the site.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. ruthsoaper says:

    I’m glad you got out there when you did Linda. It seems as if it’s gonna be a long haul before places in Michigan are open again. Great photos as always. Be well, my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Ruth and yes, I am glad I went there too. It will take a while for things to return to normal. Like you, I can hunker down here and not have to go out, though we are allowed to walk or go to parks, so I’m okay that way too and grateful for that. Still scary though – I hope your family stays safe as well Ruth.

      Like

  8. Rebecca says:

    Sounds like a fun adventure with lots of interesting things to see, the alpacas being my favorite. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it was a fun afternoon Rebecca and it followed two hours at Elizabeth Park, always a nice venue on the water to visit. The alpacas were the highlight for me too – they are cute, very inquisitive and eager to run to the fence to scope you out. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Laurie says:

    Wow! Helicopters and alpacas rather than squirrels and backyard birds. Great post! What luck to get an individual tour of the closed alpaca farm.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the post Laurie. Yes, I must return to some squirrel posts – I’m way overdue. I went to the Detroit River a lot in February and March and had taken a lot of waterfowl photos, so I was looking for something different last Sunday – these fuzzy alpacas fit the bill and seeing the helicopters and airplanes taking off and landing was fun too. I was lucky to get that little tour and see “the girls” up close. I was sorry I missed the wild turkeys though – can’t win ’em all I guess. 🙂

      Like

  10. Joni says:

    What shaggy creatures they are! And cute…..too bad you can’t get too close. It’s a good thing you got that tour in when you did, with everything closed now. I wonder if they will close the parks, but they said it was okay for people to get exercise as long as they are social distancing. Our snow has melted now too but was still a shock to see this morning. PS. I do remember see that Where the Boys Movie movie on tv in the 60’s – with George Hamilton – that was a trip back! And the song too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, aren’t they cute Joni? The first time I went in the Fall of 2018, there were more of the boys roaming around eating grass and coming up to the fence to say “hi”. Good thing I got a lot of trips taken in February and March as I’m reluctant to go back and get gas, even though I have an old pair of gloves I keep in the car to pump gas all the time, all year around (don’t want the smell of gas on my gloves or bare hands, so have always used gloves and keep them in a box in the car). Just trying to avoid germs. I saw they were allowing access to the Metroparks and usually if you go for the day it is $10.00, but now it is just free for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. I didn’t think they would do that on the weekend too. But it’s good for people to go since there is nowhere else to go right now and they are saying don’t go on playground equipment and the restrooms are closed. If you had a little kid, they may not understand not climbing on the playground equipment, so you’d have to be standing right there.

      I only saw one other person at the Park today – didn’t know him, a young guy and I measured the width of the pathway – just by my feet is 9 feet wide, so likely 10 feet wide as I just did it quickly.

      Yes, I knew if anyone would appreciate that flashback it would be you – we were not that old, but I think everyone has heard the song or heard of that movie – yes, George Hamilton (and probably tanned back them too!)

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Alpacas are just the cutest animal. How nice that they clean and sell the wool at their own place. What an amazing day you had.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a fun day Diane. Yes, and they have a regular knitting class and they sell items they knit from those alpacas too. I hope next year things are back to normal again with the bridge as well as our current health crisis.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Aww – the Alpacas are so darn cute – you caught some great shots! Thank you for sharing the adventure you had, it’s so nice that the owners let you in and that you got a tour too. I wish you safe travels!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………I enjoyed your blog today…………………..I laughed right out loud on some of “the girls”, Llama pictures…………………………they’re so darn cute………………….You are a terrific writer and photographer……………………………..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you so much Ann Marie. It was a fun afternoon and I’m glad you liked “the girls” pictures – they were cute when they came running over to the fence to see Richard. I hope you and Steven can go this Summer or Fall when all this Coronavirus issue is over. Thank you for the directions how to take the toll bridge too.

      Like

  14. your having too much fun Linda. I heard they like to spit If they don’t like you. That looks like a Turkey Vulture cruising.
    This was a full day! You must of been tired.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a long day Wayne – two hours at Elizabeth Park, then a good part of the afternoon on Grosse Ile. I was lucky there was no spitting, so they must have perceived a friendly face. Both Gail and Richard told me that the spitting rarely happens – they are a happy bunch of alpacas! I was sorry to not see the bees and honey. The bees died from GMO spraying on corn – it is a rural area. Richard is not going to be keeping any more bees. They did produce a little honey – he offered me a “swipe” but I had gloves and the camera, so I told him thanks and passed on it. You’re right about the Turkey Vulture – I blew the picture up when I uploaded them and could see the red face, just like last time … sigh, a girl can dream anyway. I thought it was an eagle or a hawk. It was fairly close to me, right overhead, but I was shooting blindly, right into the sun, so had low expectations the photos would come out at all. I walked almost six miles Sunday and found another small nature preserve which I had heard about but did not find before – I hope to return to check it out before the free bridge shuts down until October.

      Like

      • I hate to hear about the Bees being wiped out! Stuff like that erodes the natural processes!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, isn’t that sad and he won’t be doing beekeeping anymore he said. Why weren’t people more careful? One day we won’t have bees at this rate. As we get closer to the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, April 22nd, I guess no one will be thinking about what to do to help Mother Earth, even on this special anniversary.

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      • the virus will shout much louder than Earth Day. I’ver never found the celebration to be worth anything. If someones going to be doing something for Nature they’ll be doing it 365 not just for one day. It gives too many people for doing one days work.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        I agree with you on this Wayne. It is obliterating everything – every event. The first year it was big stuff and I can remember people getting seedlings if you went to the store and people handing them out and encouraging you to plant them. Pine seedlings if I remember right. You’re absolutely right – people care once a year as it is something to Tweet about or post on their Facebook page – it’s like Mother’s and Father’s Day and some who never see their parents except that one day.

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      • our concentration as a species has ADD.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am amazed at how many people must not have a radio (apart from a car radio) … they constantly tell how to get the news if you are not streaming it, like Alexa or on the phone. The drive-up testing sites you show your doctor prescription by holding up your smartphone. If you don’t have a smartphone these days … I can live without one, as do you (as you mentioned before). It’s a whole new world – only digital anymore, anything else loses interest quickly as you say.

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      • Its good to have a radio for power outages. A wind up even better. I’ve heard they have special ones that even If they are off an Emergency Alert will turn it on and alert the person!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I had a transistor radio for years but had to get a new one – I should have looked for it today. I ordered it from Amazon as no stores here have them and mine stopped working after about 30 years. I put it away as I got it late Fall when severe weather was done. I got out the emergency battery-operated lanterns as we’re having severe weather overnight – did you see pics of the Jonesboro, Arkansas tornado today – I saw it on Accuweather. I have an old AM/FM radio headphones I used to wear outside, so I can use that if the power is out but one of the earphones is messed up and buzzes loudly. I didn’t order the Midland radio from Amazon because I wanted to get it programmed at a store. I had a Red Cross radio and it had the crank and also a solar patch as well to run on solar power, but I could not program it. I bought it at Radio Shack, then Radio Shack went bankrupt and closed down and would not help me program it when I went back – they had started liquidating.

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      • A good radio is worth its weight in gold!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes! I hated to lose the old Panasonic. It had a long antenna so pulled in stations loud and clear. In fact I still have it because it is a battery issue – I cannot dislodge the battery, even using a spoon. I did locate the new radio in case we had a power outage from the wind.

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      • the battery in your radio has “salted”. When batteries do that they can weld themselves to the contacts. Even If you were able to dislodge the battery the contacts most assuredly are destroyed.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Wow, I didn’t know that – I have had batteries oxidize before – what a mess. I had some huge “D” batteries for the lantern and kept them in a box under the couch so that if we had a power outage, I knew right where they were. I didn’t want them to go bad or oxidize. The power went out and I pulled out the box and reached in. A battery had liquid all over the bottom of the box and I got it all over my hand and it burnt the skin.

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      • batteries are like a quart of milk…….they both last a certain amount of time. Never leave them inside something you do not use very often.They’ll salt and destroy the unit.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        I did keep the old radio – it is a pocket transistor, just like this new one. I wanted to get the emergency radio (Midland) at a electronics/appliance store – they had a person who would configure it for my area but they were not always there at the store … worked part time or something, and then they had torn up the entire street, a busy thoroughfare so I didn’t get it done. The apps for severe weather only work for smartphones and I don’t have one. It is still rainy and somewhat windy this morning. Hopefully I’ll get out anyway.

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      • I woke up to a large amount of hail on the ground this morning.
        I bet If you contacted a local Ham radio club they’d be able to configure your radio.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’ll bet Shorty was not happy – is he back? I recall you mentioned in a post he had not been around for a while. Hail – your weather is worse than ours! That is a good idea hooking up with a ham operator. I will keep that in mind for when things are back to normal again (hopefully before the severe storms in hot and humid August) – that’s what I should have done with the Red Cross radio from Radio Shack.

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      • you should become a Ham radio operator!

        Like

  15. J P says:

    I skimmed past the alpacas, it was the airplanes and helicopters that grabbed me. 🙂

    I flew for a short time years back and still love a small airport. I had forgotten about those signs. The flight plan lets people know your route. Closing it is like calling your Mom to let her know you got home safely so that she won’t go out looking for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well you would have loved this small airport JP. We saw several small planes that afternoon, but I liked the rear prop plane and the helicopter coming down on the helicopter pad the best. They still have the Sanyo blimp come into this small airport per Richard.

      Liked by 1 person

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