The sounds of silence.

Spring officially arrived one month ago today. Of course, that was just a date on the calendar and it doesn’t mean Spring is here to stay, nor Winter has departed for good. I mention this because last Friday we had an inch or two of the white stuff. You know very well that Mother Nature, being the assertive gal she is, was not going to let the Winter season slip out of her clutches without putting up a good fight. The snow we had last Wednesday morning was merely a tease. I returned from my walk, having taken the car for a wee spin to the Park, when the flakes began to fly in earnest just as I pulled into the garage. Snow this late in April here in Southeast Michigan is not unheard of. It is more of a fluke than the norm and once the sun’s rays were out, by day’s end, both “snowfalls” were history.

Today’s post is about a walk taken during that brutally cold week in mid-February. Though I walked every day that week, I only used the camera one morning and these are the shots and the narrative from that time.

Munch, Crunch, Creak, Crack and … Clack.

Because I took the bus to my job in Downtown Detroit for many decades, my closets and drawers are bulging with cold-weather clothing, lots of warm woolens and polar fleece garb, all which I predict should last me the rest of my life. There were many days I stood in the freezing cold and/or a snowstorm waiting on the bus … except for my toes, I usually stayed comfortable.

Lookin’ back

During this entire week of February 17th, there was no snow, so I didn’t think twice about suiting up and heading to my favorite nature nook each morning. On Friday the 21st, I even made a pit stop first at Dingell Park. I was in search of eagles, but found only many shivering seagulls, whose photos I shared in back-to-back posts last month. Incredibly, Southeast Michigan was enjoying four days of sunshine in a row, the first time this had happened since July 19th, so I wrote that fact down to use whenever I prepared this post.

It was just me, myself and I.

So, in the dead of Winter, during that frigid week, day after day I was the only walker brave enough to suit up and stroll along the perimeter path at Council Point Park, and each morning, as I stepped onto that asphalt, the silence was almost deafening. On this particular morning, the coldest day yet, I figured I would not only be alone in my thoughts, but likely no critters, furry or feathered, would stray from the cozy confines of their respective nests to greet me, so I would be leaving peanut offerings on the picnic table for them to enjoy later.

In the dead silence, I noticed even the little bugger, a/k/a the Red-Bellied Woodpecker, was tucked away somewhere, as his squeaky and squawky noises and tree drilling were strangely absent from these morning walks. No ducks paddled and preened; not a single goose flew overhead, nor dined on the dead grass. The Park sure was not a happenin’ place.

I had my camera in my pocket each day and decided I would only pull it out if something struck my fancy. I ended up taking about 25 photos on this day where the sun dipped in and out of the clouds, (that “ineffective sunshine” as the meteorologists call it). I’ll tell you that those rays didn’t help with the 12F real feel temps with a 15 mph wind stinging my face, the only part of my body exposed to the elements.

On that day, things were strangely eerie

The quiet was deafening … if that makes sense. And then I heard it … a faint rustling which kind of creeped me out just a bit. The wind was clipping along, and stirred the dead leaves and seeds which I noted were wiggling on their stems – whew, no worries that I was NOT alone!

Even these frozen orange berries, which added a touch of color to the dull landscape, similarly brushed up against each other, thus making a slight pinging noise. The sound reminded me of Clackers, a game we played back in the day with a string and two balls that clinked and clacked against one another.

So I strolled along, my bag of peanuts at the ready, should my peanut pals scope me out from their high perches on this bone-chilling morning. I looked up, hoping to see a squirrel or two peering out of a nest, so I could wiggle the bag to entice them to the ground. The plastic bag, stiff from the cold, made a rattling noise but there were no visitors.

Rise and shine – perhaps someone put the coffee on?

It seemed that by my second time around the “loop” there was a realization by the squirrels and birds that “we’d better get our furry and feathered butts out to greet Linda, the only human tripping along the perimeter path these days – let’s send the Welcoming Committee.”

On my second time around, I pulled out the camera and propped the bag up in my pocket, trying out my skills at being ambidextrous to dole out peanuts and click away, the latter task, a tad more difficult, given the two pair of heavy gloves I was wearing and fingers that were beginning to feel like popsicles.

I kept walking on – finally a sign of life, the sound of the woodpecker at his favorite tree. You’ll recall I recently did a post featuring this Red-Bellied Woodpecker who has decimated this tall tree. He is always “on duty” searching for grubs and drilling into this tree. Well, the resident woodpecker spied me and shot me a rather defiant look as he continued dinging away. He posed for a split second, setting himself up for a picture. I snapped, but the camera rebelled just a little due to the cold, but I got the shot and he returned to the task at hand. In the silence of the morn, once he resumed drilling, the sound reverberated like a jackhammer two blocks away. He looked down at me after I offered peanuts, but he continued his search for freeze-dried grubs … well suit yourself Bud.

I kept walking and there was another noise, a different type of noise which stopped me in my tracks. A Mallard duck suddenly dropped out of the sky and onto the Creek surface. He landed with a thud and a slight skid on the ice. Perhaps Mr. Mallard didn’t anticipate the Creek was frozen over, and the ice surely left him with a frosty bottom. Momentarily that Mallard sat on the ice and I worried he was hurt and I resisted the urge to call out “yo, are you alright over there?” After a moment’s time, the duck flew over to the cement landing to nurse its bruised backside (and feelings).

A whole lotta creakin’, crackin’ was going on.

In the still of the morning, the unmistakable sound of the ice creaking and cracking at the shoreline was also infiltrating my now, near-silent stroll. I stole over to the shoreline and saw the ice, crusted and banked up in some places, a mirror-like sheen in other places. I stopped to listen to the noise …

… and it was then I noticed that the branches of the bent and off-kilter tree were subtly scraping the surface of the ice. Each time the wind blew, a noise like chalk upon a blackboard echoed through the passageway.

Well, I looked around for something else to take photos of, since both hands were free with no birds or squirrels coming to call. I was horrified to see mounds of dead shad, some buried in an icy grave where water had lapped up along the edge and frozen in place. Ugh! This is not uncommon during brutally cold weather where the oxygen is lacking once aquatic plants die off beneath the icy surface. Luckily, the frogs and turtles bury themselves deep beneath the Creek and generally survive – the fish without oxygen, not so much.

Finally the critters began to stir

Just as I decided this third time on the perimeter path had better be the charm, otherwise I’d just deposit peanuts on the picnic table as I usually do, then head home, the Park suddenly came alive.

Parker may like to think his moniker should be: “Parker, the Pulse of the Park” but truth be told, he is one of the quietest of the Council Point Park inhabitants. Despite his cute antics like shameless begging and stomping on my shoe tip with his front paws to get my attention, he is generally well behaved. The only time you hear squirrels is if they give a distress call, or occasionally, some chitter-chatter when they are playing hide-and-seek. Occasionally they race around and crash into each other, just like a couple of cartoon characters and you expect to see stars hovering over their dazed looks. During mating time, there is some fancy footwork running up and down the trees and the flinging of bodies from one branch to another to escape another squirrel in pursuit. It is amusing to watch how they spring forth and land on their feet – they are quite the acrobats. I figure their angry chatter would loosely translate to “no, I’m not in the mood right now” or “maybe later, ‘cuz Linda’s here with peanuts right now.” There are also the loud squeals or protests when one squirrel misappropriates a peanut from the other’s pile of nuts and half-tailed Stubby is famous for doing so. I often chastise him for his actions, but, like any youngster, my words fall on deaf ears. Yes, sadly there are bullies even in the squirrel world.

On quiet mornings, I’ll hear, long before I see, the descent of a squirrel from its nest, headfirst to ground level. With no other noise around, there is the discernible sound of their claws as they click, click, click against the bark once the nests’ occupants are bright-eyed and bushy-tailed and ready for breakfast.

Munchin’ and crunchin’.

I fed the squirrels and watched their long, furry tails curled over the top of their heads, providing them a little respite from the wind. I heard the sound of peanut shells being cracked and spilling onto the pathway. I threw out some more and knew they were happy for peanuts which they would finish and scurry back to their homes and the only evidence of my presence was piles of peanut shells along the pathway.

Here are a few of the squirrels happily noshing away that morning.

The Cardinal and Blue Jay waited ‘til the coast was clear to swoop down for their fair share too.

Just as I was ready to wrap up this trek, my load lighter, but spirits brighter, I came upon the Mallard. He was snoozing on the cement landing and lifted his eyelid to peer at me, then decided I meant no harm and snuggled back down to finish his nap.

I’m sure glad those brutally cold days are behind us and I’m hoping this week’s projected warm-up happens.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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61 Responses to The sounds of silence.

  1. I had no idea frozen berries could make a noise. I knew ice could. I used to walk along the shore on Long Island. When ice lay on the edges of the water, it would creak and groan constantly. Load snaps and cracks could be startling. I enjoyed your sounds of silence.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I am not sure what these berries are – maybe Winterberries? Though I have seen Winterberry wreaths in both red and orange, so maybe some of the wreaths’ berries were dyed. This particular tree is full of berries and they must not taste good as the birds and squirrels have left them alone. The berries were knocking against one another making pinging noises. The ice sounds are interesting. I was down at the River a few times either in 2018 or 2019 when we had a Polar Vortex a week before, and there were ice floes everywhere. Not especially big ones, but they were knocking against one another and against the seawall and it sounded like ice cubes when they make noise in a glass. I found it interesting listening to the ice. More interesting was the seagulls and ducks riding along companionably on the ice floes. I took lots of pictures that day. The most interesting thing I saw were the waves that had frozen in place at Bishop Park … I wondered how that much water could freeze so suddenly. Glad you enjoyed the post Anne – this was my last very wintry post and I figured I’d better use it soon.

      Like

  2. Fred Bailey says:

    Great photos Linda! The fish under ice brought back some wonderful childhood memories. Going to the woods at the back of the farm to get a Christmas tree in a foot of new snow. We crossed a tiny stream where my dad stopped to clear the squeaky powder from ice. There beneath darted several minnows. Magic to a four-year old and the same kid over sixty years later.
    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad it brought back some nice memories for you Fred. It was a frigid day but look at the sunshine! It was a beautiful walk and I was happy I found something to take photos of, as brutally cold and drab as the landscape was.

      Like

  3. Joni says:

    Lovely pictures Linda, even desolate has it’s own kind of beauty. And the shad picture gives new meaning to the phrase “frozen fish”! I guess we should be grateful to be at 40 F this week, compared to 12 F, still it doesn’t seem to have been a very warm spring. I can only recall two days of sitting on the porch.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Joni – glad you liked the pictures. It was a brutal day but sunny – that made all the difference in the walk. That and a few critters came out and down to the pathway … the fish, yes not a nice sight to see, and as I took the picture I wondered if I would include frozen fish in the post, but decided since the post was about ice, cold and desolate as you point out, might as well. I thought the ice was really beautiful. It turned out to be nice today. We were supposed to have rain – never rained. We are having cold weather the rest of April and a couple days this week just to the low 40s. I am not getting rid of my Winter coat and hat until May at this rate … at least I put the heavy boots away.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I have not put my boots away yet – in case we have flurries on Tues/Wed, but most days I’ve been walking in my running shoes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am hearing the same for us. We have thunderstorms tonight and then 20 degrees colder for two days. I hope it doesn’t zap the flowering trees – they are starting to come out, but not the magnolias yet. I didn’t switch back to hiking boots but they are still handy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I noticed when I walked today there isn’t a leaf on a tree here…..a few maple buds and the lilac bush has buds but that’s it. Very unspringlike except for the grass which is growing!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, the grass is growing like a weed – I have a few weeds – the nerve!!! And some dandelions are showing their tiny heads too.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Joni says:

    PS. Just got the title – Simon and Garfunkel.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes – one of my favorite songs and I was going to include the link but the post was already so long I decided not to. I wrote some notes after the walk so I would not forget some of the details; I didn’t know I’d be writing it two months later. So I had the pictures and post and all along was going to call it “Munch, Crunch, Creak, Crack” and changed the title shortly before finishing it up.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Great pictures as always. Seems like February was so long ago.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Sandra J says:

    I loved all the photos, I have heard that cracking of the ice. It is an eerie sound sometime, especially when no one else is around. I do love the squirrel that is more gray and white. The white tummy really shows up on that one. The blue feathers really show up on the duck photo. Great post, we just got back in, we left at 4 am for sunrise again. A little warmer today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Sandra … this is the post I mentioned to you when you had your last snowy post that started out mentioning it was likely the last snow and you were going to post it as we were in Spring. I wrote down the details that day so I wouldn’t forget … I’ve been doing that as I used to write the post the same day I walked and took the pictures, but it is easier this way when it involves a lot of photos. That ice cracks and groans – it is incredible and it is intensified since the passageway for the Creek is narrow and it seems to echo. It was eerie … you start to imagine all kinds of things. Those gray squirrels are so cute, especially when they are so plump in the Winter and yes the white tummy, pink nose and furry tail. They are fairly new to the Park, just the last year or so. I thought of you with the blue on the duck after we mentioned it – it really shows up here. That is early for a shoot … you’ll be ready for bed early tonight. I left earlier today. Yesterday we had ice in the morning so I left later. Not the same ambiance though – more crowded and most squirrels and birds are not out and about. We had a beautiful day today though they called for rain … not a drop.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        You mentioned it is crowded and all at the parks now. I have noticed that about the bike path out front, I mentioned it awhile ago that you never see children riding bikes anymore. Yesterday it was so nice to see, there were kids and families riding bikes and walking. Enjoying fresh air and getting lots of vit D from the sun. I have not seen that in years. And they were staying apart from each other, but yet they were togeather as families. Hopefully when everything gets back to normal, they will continue to enjoy being outside and not go back to the routines of stairing at their cell phones and computers..

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I went to Lower Huron Metropark last year – it was on my bucket list to try but I had never mapped out directions. I discovered the day I got lost trying to get to the sunflower festival in Belleville. I even wrote about the fact that this park had many bike trails and this park connects to two other metroparks by a series of trails … I could not believe how many families were outside enjoying a bike ride, even little kids. I had not seen little kids on bikes for years. Once I learned to ride a bike, my friends and I were never without out bikes in the nice weather. I hope this new trend continues as well once things normalize again. I heard on the news this morning that people will no longer be having casual hugs, handshakes and reluctant to attend events like sports and concerts, racing events (running/walking type) whether the events are indoors or outdoors – they said maybe if a vaccine is found. They said more people will work from home and attend church from streaming going forward even after we are post-pandemic – I think from listening to so many experts, nothing will be normal at least until 2021.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    Beautiful nature photos, Linda! I bet you are glad you braved the cold and ventured out to get all these good shots, now that it is difficult to get park photos due to the need to wear a mask. How about that? I never knew squirrels would steal each other’s treasures. Stubby is quite the thief!

    And I do remember clackers. I couldn’t get them to work for the longest time, then one day, it just clicked, and I could get them going.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Laurie – I’m glad you enjoyed them. It was such a brutally cold day but the sun was out and that made a big difference. Yes this is the end of the real wintry pics though I have some taken in the Winter but since we had an almost snowless Winter, you’d never know when I took them. I probably won’t run out of pictures for a while yet.

      I have photos from several long hikes I took last Summer that I’ve yet to use. I was thinking with this dust filter, it’s going to be hard to get the camera near and I think it will be easier with the soft masks – when I use them and deem it safe to take pictures again. We are having a very cold week … hopefully it does not mess up the Spring flowers, or including the flowering trees. Many are blooming already. It’s a little early for the magnolias yet.

      Stubby is not nice most of the time and I don’t know if it has something to do with his missing half the tail, that makes him so aggressive. Perhaps it was a fight with another squirrel or animal? But he is aggressive and he marches over and steals peanuts and often the other squirrels scatter or he chases them.

      I thought you might remember Clackers – we’re the same age and I was going to put it reminded me of a Newton’s Cradle which I think was in all my science classes when I was in school. I guess we had to be coordinated and I didn’t get it at first either … like Chinese jumprope. You had to be somewhat coordinated for that too. 🙂

      Like

  8. Rebecca says:

    Your description of the strange silence, which made you keenly aware of sounds you wouldn’t have normally noticed, had my ears straining to hear those noises too, and your description of the cold had me shivering in my nice cozy house. I’m glad the squirrels finally showed up. They always make the cutest photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’m glad you liked the descriptions Rebecca – it sure was cold that day and it felt stranger than normal to be there by myself with the eerie sounds. Those squirrels are beyond cute, especially the little gray one who is all plumped up with the white tummy. The birds looked cold – the blue jay’s crest was pushed back like he had been wearing a hat.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………………you are such an interesting writer and story teller…………………..please save some of these bare wintery, icy, and cold pictures for a hot and humid day in August……………………so we can cool off reading about them

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ann Marie – I am glad you enjoyed this post. You would not think a Park in such a brutally cold setting would have enough pictures to make a post would you? I will indeed send you this post during the Dog Days of Summer to cool you off. By then, we’ll need a breath of fresh air in the sickening heat. When will our happy medium arrive – it is a cold week this week, hopefully no more snow!

      Like

  10. Ari says:

    Oh how wonderful, I LOVE woodpeckers and what a great shot. I think Cardinals are such pretty birds, we don’t have them over here so seeing these photos really brightens my day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Ari – glad you liked these shots. I mentioned that woodpecker because I was happy to get this shot of this guy who is always drilling in this tree, then on a separate occasion, just a few days later, I had the other camera and got some close-ups of him. He is beautiful and that day the sky was so blue that it made him really stand out. Since you like woodpeckers, I’m attaching the post – he is about 1/3 of the way down.
      https://lindaschaubblog.net/2020/03/05/winter-is-for-the-birds-and-my-2020-birdie-bucket-list/
      I like the cardinals too and have a pair that nest in my yard in the barberry bush … the two of them sit on the fence. The red ones are just so vibrant, but the male and more brown-colored female sitting side-by-side make my day as well. They wait for peanuts at the house just like at the Park.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ari says:

        You are so lucky to have this wildlife so close 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes Ari – I do feel lucky. This is a small park, just one mile away from where I live and in the middle of the City, but tucked away near a Creek. I miss taking the camera and saw new goslings, (very tiny – in fact the youngest I have seen there), swimming in the Creek yesterday. I am tempted to go early before people are there and get some shots. There are few people anyway if you go early in the morning. It does not mean I’ll see the goslings again, but the past few mornings, I’ve seen lots of songbirds, the Great Blue Heron and a Black-Capped Night Heron. Sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I love that little red-topped bird… what a cutie! Those fish under the ice makes me shiver! It amazes me that they are able to survive the winter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I think he is cute too Janis. We have Downy Woodpeckers and Red-Bellied Woodpeckers at this Park. This one, a Red-Bellied Woodpecker, has red feathers on top, not much red on the belly, so I don’t get the name, but they are vibrant both in their colors and you cannot miss the noises they make while drilling on a tree. It amazes me anything is able to survive, even in a mild Winter like ours was for 2019-2020. We have colder weather now than we had in March – crazy!

      Like

  12. J P says:

    Your frozen fish reminds me of something my father used to do. He would keep a paper 1/2 gallon milk carton (open at the top) in the freezer. When he would catch a handful of little bluegills he would filet them and drop them into the carton, then add enough water to cover them and then back into the freezer. When the carton was full there was enough fish for a meal, once he got them thawed out of the block of ice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well that was one way of keeping them fresh tasting and they wouldn’t get that dreaded freezer burn as they were submerged in the ice. That was a great idea! You may remember your mom defrosting the freezer before frost-free freezers? I can remember watching my mom tackle that chore with a pot of boiling water and peering into a freezer filled with ice crystals.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Ice is always making sounds. In the dead of winter If you were to stand on a frozen lake you would hear staccato cracking sounds that would alarm anybody! Thats just the ice moves. It expands and contracts like breathing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was interesting just how loud it was – between the crackly leaves and seeds, pinging berries and that ice! Also, I failed to mention the bare trees that have branches that extend onto other tree branches and make a creaking and scraping noise. That is very interesting about the ice expanding and contracting. I have heard ice cubes doing that popping noise and didn’t know if it was the carbonation. I liked hearing the clinking of the ice floes down at the River after the Polar Vortex – the floes had broken up and had ducks and seagulls riding along on them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Isn’t that the time Eagles can be seen floating downstream?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, you are right – that first time I went there were several people taking pictures of eagles on ice floes … my eagle pic was very tiny. That was when Uncle Tree said “here is a site to go to and you’ll see beautiful eagles” … that was your site. Yes, that is where Mud Island was and the nearby steel mill spews off lots of steam so it breaks up the ice on the river and causes floes – everywhere else along the Detroit River, during a Polar Vortex event, the ice is solid, but not here … the steel mill is going to close after being there many many decades … that’s going to change that makeup of the area I would think once they close down. It is a huge building and takes up Zug Island, a neighboring island to Mud Island.

        Like

      • The only quiet I get anymore is at midnight when the grandkids and hubby are in bed! 😂🤣😂😂🤣

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I believe it – that’s why you are on here so late – you’re as bad as me!

        Like

  14. Michael says:

    I imagine it will be the loveliest of springs, especially if were stuck indoors!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It started out pretty nice Michael but has turned nasty – as I type this comment, it is a sleety mix. People worry as their flowering trees and all their tulips, and other Spring followers are not faring well after two snowfalls and an ice storm last week. We had a nice Winter – now it looks and feels worse than mid-March. I like when everything bursts into color … it does lift people’s spirits.

      Like

  15. How strange that must have been with no people or critters! Everyone is staying at home, even the critters!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Eliza says:

    Is parker going to write to us?
    Dear Parker, we’d love to hear how you’re getting on. We’re glad it’s spring so you’re managing with less nuts without too much bother. Say hi to Linda…
    Keep in touch and get close for more pictures.
    Love, light, and glitter

    Like

  17. Pam Lazos says:

    The sound of transition! Beautiful photos, Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Mackenzie says:

    There is something so serene, crisp and calming about these pictures. Michigan has a certain “scent” in the air that we used to talk about even as kids. It’s so fresh and beautiful, hard to describe- but your pictures and writing captures it. Thanks for sharing, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Mackenzie – glad you enjoyed the post and happy to bring you a few remembrances of your days spent in Michigan back when your family visited up North. I remember that when we first followed one another you had made a recent visit to Michigan (your grandpa’s birthday if memory serves me right?)

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Wonderful photos of your critter friends! Thanks for sharing your observations about squirrels. I have very little knowledge about their behaviors and I worry that they might bite.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Esther – I don’t think they would bite, unless rabid, but once you begin feeding them, they will gravitate toward you forever! And, since I have lost most everything out of my garden, they will dig holes in the garden to hide their peanuts – not cool, but I let them have their way since I try not to go back there anymore than necessary.

      Like

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