On Friday I was social distancing with my camera …

… it was six inches away from my face.

This, despite a month of being overly cautious and deciding that it probably was NOT a good idea to be fiddling with the camera anywhere near my face. The State of Michigan, tenth most populous in the nation, still ranks high as to cases and deaths from COVID-19. At least we have dropped from third to sixth place – not that the sixth place stat raises my comfort level any.

However, I sure am happy I took my camera to the Park because, as wonderful as the walk began, it ended on a sour note – but more on that later.

So, anyway … I bit the bullet.

It was those first goslings that debuted at Council Point Park this week that clinched it. Tuesday morning I was walking along the perimeter path, then there they were – swimming in a neat queue behind Mom with a proud Pop bringing up the rear – there were five goslings in all.

Though the family was hugging the Creek bank and it likely would not have made a stellar shot anyway, inwardly I was mad at myself that I hadn’t brought along the camera for that “just in case” shot. I made up my mind I would return with my camera on Friday morning. Our Wednesday and Thursday weather was abysmal, so my next shot at taking shots would be Friday, May 1st.

I wanted to be the first one at my favorite nature nook and showed up later than I would have liked, but was bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, ready to get some Spring-y shots and hopefully gosling pictures for a Mother’s Day weekend post.

Well, Council Point Park did not disappoint with all it had to offer.

I stepped onto the perimeter path and right away saw two large dark objects in the bushes – they were smaller than geese, bigger than ducks – oh wait … they were ducks. They were American Black Ducks. We see them occasionally paddling away in the Creek, but they are not regular visitors at this venue, nor at any other shoreline park that I frequent. These are the first pictures I’ve ever taken of them. I researched a little and since both ducks have greenish-color bills, not yellow, they are females.

After at least a dozen or so duck shots, I was at the fork in the path – hmm, so left or right? I started on the scenic side, along the water’s edge …

A fellow walker approached me from the opposite direction and said “you have your camera today – better get to the bent-over tree as the baby geese are there!” Well, I’d have cut through the grassy donut part of the loop, but we’d had two inches of rain in as many days, so I just lit a fire under myself to get clear across the Park in record time.

Except

I had to pass the cement landing, this time approaching from the opposite direction. This was clearly to my advantage. Harry the Great Blue Heron was ankle deep in the water, either gazing at his reflection, or fishing for his breakfast. I think it was the latter, as I heard a splash and movement in the water, but Harry came up empty-handed, er … empty-beaked.

Harry posed nicely for me – so sneaking up from behind did not cause him to bolt and squawk as he usually does. I wished I had a treat for him as a reward for his cooperation.

Having secured a few shots of Harry the Heron, I hurried along to see the First Family of 2020. Whew – they were still there, grazing on the lush grass near the misshapen tree. I arrived just on time, as a few minutes later they headed for the water. This photo shows a few goslings but I’m going to save the rest of the photos of the parents and their little darlings for Mother’s Day weekend.

After watching the family plop into the water, I whirled around to discover a second family of parents and goslings lurking in the nearby bushes. I took some more pictures, while hoping the gander didn’t take issue with me as the family was fairly close. On top of it, my face mask was steaming up my glasses and I couldn’t see too clearly, but it was all good … I got my shots and nobody got hurt (I’m talking about me here, not them).

The squirrels gave me about three minutes to ooh and aah over the goslings, then reminded me in a not-so-subtle-way, that it was feeding time and I had been MIA the past two days. One day they will learn to take a paw and point it to their mouth (just kidding). As you can see, Parker was feeling neglected and just a little antsy for nuts and used his “please feed me – I’m starving” routine to his advantage.

I spread out lots of peanuts, hoping to lure plenty of furry and feathered pals down to the pathway and it worked. In fact … it worked too well, in that in between snapping squirrel shots, I was missing the Jays, Cardinals and Red-Winged Blackbirds swooping down. Here’s some more squirrel shots as I know you’ve been missing them. 🙂

I put down more peanuts, but the Red-Winged Blackbird only made that prior cameo appearance, however the beautiful Blue Jay and male Cardinal returned for a second helping.

I was happily taking shots here and there, hoping not to miss anything (or anyone) but a roly-poly groundhog waddled by and though I saw it briefly, unfortunately I didn’t bring that image home with me, as he scooted into a burrow just as soon as he saw the whites of my eyes.

A male Downy Woodpecker studied me, gave me the side-eye, then stayed on task tackling his tree as he looked for grubs for his morning meal. I identified his gender by the red patch at the back of his head, which color was also handy to alert me to his presence in the tree – they are not loud birds like the Red-Bellied Woodpeckers.

So, I was doing pretty well, rounding up my furry and feathered friends to make it worth my while to have taken the camera with me. I took a few landscape shots, including some pretty blossoms …

… and endless dandelions …

… when suddenly a big bunny burst onto the scene and filled up my viewfinder. It was the first bunny I’d seen since last year, so another “first” on this trek. It stopped to munch a dandelion, then did a bit of primping.

I love the sun hitting those delicate ears.

I was so engrossed in my trek and taking pictures that I finally glanced at my watch – yikes, it was really late! The morning had zipped by and I figured I’d better head home to be on time for work. I was glad I had walked to the Park because I sure did not garner many steps while there.

And now for the “down” part of my Park adventure.

From the perimeter path, I saw a police car in the parking lot, but didn’t think too much of that as they patrol there from time to time. But, by the time I walked to the entrance/exit of the Park, that police car was parked horizontally across that only entrance/exit. My interest was piqued. Your Roving Reporter approached the vehicle to ask questions. It was my first day of masking up in a bandana and I probably looked like a bank robber, but my muffled words through the red fabric asked why he was parked there and if the Park was going to be closed? Before he could respond, I added “are you closing the Park due to the Coronavirus, coyotes or crime?” To be honest, I hoped his answer was one of the latter two. I don’t know that he appreciated my alliteration, but he heard me out anyway and said he had no details. I thanked him, told him to stay safe and left.

In retrospect, I probably already knew the answer as I stewed and fretted all the way home.

Later in the day I checked our City’s Info and Crime Forum on Facebook where I found a slew of comments about Council Point Park’s sudden closure earlier in the day and many were wondering why it was done? The general consensus was that the playscapes had already been cordoned off with crime tape back in late March to discourage kids from playing there; we also have metal adult exercise equipment on the other side of the Park which was similarly cordoned off. So why was a police vehicle guarding the entrance to the Park?

Well our questions were answered when the City website advised that due to a record 251 deaths from COVID-19 in our City, all parks had been closed down immediately. We have 22 parks in the City; some are just playground equipment, some baseball diamonds only, but Council Point Park is considered the jewel of the City. I feel badly for the missed joy I will have. I find happiness at this venue, in not only the beauty but my delight in feeding the various critters as well. I sure am glad I made the effort to take my camera and had such a pleasant trek on Friday.

Hopefully my favorite nature nook will re-open before the goslings are teenagers, or worse … when they fledge at approximately 50-60 days old and leave for the rest of the Summer with their parents. The goslings will grow in leaps and bounds, so that by the time they fledge, they are 25 times larger than they were at birth. Putting it into perspective, yes, they will be a bit beefier than we will be with our “Quarantine Fifteen” poundage in the same amount of time. I will hang out in the ‘hood and still go to larger parks on the weekend, weather permitting.

[Header image from Pinterest; the rest are my own photos]

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
This entry was posted in COVID-19, nature, walk, walking and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

64 Responses to On Friday I was social distancing with my camera …

  1. You found plenty to write about. Refreshing! I hope the park won’t be closed long, because we are going to miss it through you

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was so glad I took the camera and everywhere I looked there was something to see – I felt like a little kid. Thank you Anne – I hope they will lift the restriction when the Governor lifts the stay-at-home order, but this was strictly the Mayor shutting down all 22 parks. We have 4,000 deaths in Michigan, more than that now, it was 4,000 on Friday and 250 IS pretty bad.

      Like

  2. Eliza says:

    I’m so sad about the closure…
    This post was gorgeous to read. I was walking around with you 🙂 Harry definitely deserved a treat!
    💕💕💕💕💕💕💕🐬

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Me too Ellie – it is my morning joy … I also worry about the critters as they are dependent on food as it’s not foraging time … no berries, no soft pine cones … that worries me too. I need a treat for Harry – I’ll search for “heron treats” on Amazon! A fellow UK blogger once told me that you can buy swan treats over there. Time to go across the Pond and fetch some. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean says:

    Goslings! They make me smile. Closing the park does not make me smile. Better safe than sorry, though. Any idea when they’ll open it/them again?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      The goslings make me smile too Ally. Last year we had four families and they were born a week or so apart, so we had little ones running around for most of May, part of June. I am unhappy about the Park closure, not only for me but for the squirrels and birds … the more I go there, the more they are fed, the less they look for their own food and it is too early to forage, no berries or soft pine cones yet. I have been feeding them for seven years. They may gravitate to the neighborhoods around the Park, so I will look for them there in the coming days. They did not indicate when the parks will open again – I hope when the Governor lifts the stay-at-home order, but this has nothing to do with the Governor; it was our City’s Mayor who made the decision. We have 4,000 + deaths in Michigan as of yesterday. This is the time that the Park is a showcase with trees leafing out, flowering trees, some wildflowers and babies.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. ruthsoaper says:

    What an exciting day filled with wildlife. I’m so glad you took your camera and got so many beautiful shots. I’m am sad to know that they have closed the parks in your area. I feel like officials are just grasping at straws trying to stop this thing. If it is being transmitted at parks with the play areas already closed down and people “social distancing” is there any stopping it?

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Joni says:

    A lovely adventurous day Linda! Loved esp. the picturesque shots of Harry the Heron. So disappointing re the closure, as you will miss all the trees budding out and new life, but hopefully it won’t be for too long, esp as many other districts are now opening up their parks. I can’t imagine a park would be that much of a risk of transmission, as Ruth says above….if there are that many people congregating, maybe they could have some bylaw officers patrolling to remind the offenders, rather than punish everyone?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Joni – glad you liked it. I was happy with the Harry the Heron pictures … now I know to approach him from behind, but that confuses the birds and squirrels as I usually go counterclockwise on the path and a few of the birds follow along my route flying from one tree to the next so they know when to swoop down. I’m hoping it’s not too long either, but I went by this morning when I got home from walking at Elizabeth Park and a small nature preserve. It looked abandoned as there was a sea of dandelions and they have barricades at the entrance of the Park. That would just bar vehicles and you can access the Park all along the fringe of the Park and get to the second walking trail and connect there. I saw one walker, a guy who walks/runs (a little of both) only on weekends … pulled over to chat with him and he said yesterday/today he parked in the neighborhood and walked the fringe. It’s a bit away from the part where I usually walk but I don’t see anything wrong with what he was doing. I think they would have been better to institute fines too Interestingly, at Elizabeth Park today they have exercise equipment all through the park. It is not geared for kids, but more for adults. It was not cordoned off and people were using it. They are items like pull-up bars, parallel bars – no restrictions. I hope it does not take too long for things to get back to normal. The weekends, if no rain, I’ll try the larger parks like before. My car needed a run so I put about 30 miles on it in my jaunts today.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Sandra J says:

    Wow, what an exciting day trip. The park path looks so inviting with the flowering tree. I wonder why they call them black ducks when they are truly brown. 🙂 How wonderful that you got so close to Harry. They do spook so quickly. They always fly off before I even see them usually. I just love it when Parker sits at your feet. I just don’t see that everyday. What a great day Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Sandra – glad you enjoyed the post and it does look inviting doesn’t it? The flowering trees were just starting to bloom and those tiny white wildflowers on the ground near the trees. Took some pictures of them today – there were tons of those tiny white flowers in the grass, some very pale pink as well – I just looked them up – they are “Spring Beauty” the second photo at this link:
      https://www.mlive.com/entertainment/erry-2018/05/48dbdbf1656565/michigan_spring_wildflowers.html

      I was lucky with Harry, I approached him a different way – usually he sees me coming head on. He was into his breakfast catch of the day. 🙂 Those black ducks did look more brown – I took a lot of pictures hoping they’d show up darker but they still look brown. Arnie at the Park always points out the black ducks in the water when he sees me to go have a look – they are not common at all in our area.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        The link was so good Linda, I saw a few of those flowers in the forest here and had no idea what kind of flowers they were. Plus it showed those green plants that look like umbrellas, they are all over in the woods, but the artical showed they actually have a flower that shows up underneath the leaves. I did not know that. Thanks for the link. I saved that one. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Glad you liked it Sandra and I have saved it too … I have seen a lot of wildflowers at Lake Erie Metropark … I never walk on that side, but last year saw a big golden area of what looked to be flowers far away and I kept walking toward it – it was August and I thought it was too early for sunflowers but they have several “natural grow areas” as they call them and we had a hot summer, so it might have been. It turned out they were wild black-eyed susans. But I saw lots of wildflowers along the way – I have to find what they are … that is a good starting point. I’m glad you found your names and I saw both white and pale pink tiny flowers at the tree bases yesterday and in the grass … same as I saw at Council Point Park last week so I was glad to find a name for them to use in an upcoming post.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        Yes, it sure helps, I was looking for a name for a duck I saw awhile back. I looked at hundreds of duck photos trying to find one similar. Never did find it. Who knew there were that many ducks until you have to look for just one. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I know – like butterflies. I saw and took photos of a blue butterfly last Summer. I only know the common butterfly names. I searched on the butterfly info websites for blue butterfly – it was a brown butterfly with powder-blue spots … I found it a long time later and it is called a “Red-Spotted Purple” – go figure. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        🙂 After awhile they must have had a hard time coming up with names. I think they picked them out of a hat when they get down to the last one.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I agree Sandra because this butterfly was no more purple spotted than I was!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. bindyamc says:

    Lovely pictures n write up!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Margy says:

    What a great wild life day!
    Interesting how many different ways our governments react. In many areas, parks are just reopening – not as a result of the cases and deaths, but because of the realization that people need to get outside and walk in parks because it makes them healthier.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      That is smart of them to keep the people outside Margy. I am disappointed in our Park being closed, and interestingly I was at a larger park today and there were at least 150 people, and only about 10 of them had masks on (fishermen standing side by side). That sure surprised me given Michigan’s stats

      Like

  9. I am so sorry the parks are closing but very happy you will be safe!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Diane – where I went today (Elizabeth Park) … by the time I left, it was crowded and very few masks and people everywhere. I went early enough to avoid crowds and left when it got busy. I hope they open it up soon. I drove by there today and it looked very desolate there, especially with the dandelions everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Too many people not following the rules ruins it for the rest of us!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is always the way isn’t it Diane? There were a lot of people at Elizabeth Park and I saw one police vehicle but he didn’t approach anyone, but I was surprised about people using the exercise equipment, so apparently the City of Trenton has no rules about it. The pony farm was closed indefinitely – they would have been busy as nice as the weather was yesterday.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………….I’ve never seen a black duck and never so close to notice that they have a bluish green beak………………………..that was cool and yes I’m excited about the new baby goslings…………………..and Mr. parker is so darn cute waiting for you to feed him……………….I feel badly that closing the parks are blocking so many people who love to walk and enjoy the scenery everyday……………………….I feel badly about the stats showing Lincoln Park not doing well also

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Hi Ann Marie – the two black ducks just started showing up last Summer and another walker, Arnie, pointed them out to me – they are much bigger than the regular mallards and I’ve never seen them on land, so it was nice to see them. I hope you will see baby goslings and the groundskeeper does not destroy the nest … you need to have a few cute and fuzzy goslings in your morning walk. I feel very badly about the parks and I hope that they are re-opened soon. I went past there yesterday and it looked deserted and barricaded at the entrance/exit area. I went to Elizabeth Park and it was crowded by the time I left and after that I went to Grosse Ile to the nature preserve on Meridian – I saw it when I went to the alpaca farm in March and wanted to try it out.

      Like

  11. Laurie says:

    So glad you got to take these lovely photos at the park while you could. Your timing was good! Reading about the goslings reminded me of a story I wanted to tell you. bill and I were running on Saturday when we encountered a young couple looking down into a storm drain. They called to us. We stayed 6 feet away but approached to see what they wanted. A family of ducklings had fallen into the drain and the mama duck was making a terrible racket. Luckily, I knew the phone number of a policeman, who came to the rescue with a net. All 8 of the babies were rescued and the mama duck lead her babies to a nearby stream and safety!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Oh what a sweet story Laurie! Every so often you read about ducklings falling through a sewer grate and the city workers come and pull the grate off and reach in for the ducklings – sometimes they walk out. I’m so glad you were able to help the couple and the mama duck and her brood.

      It was all in the timing Friday morning Laurie … they shut the park down and have now put a barricade across the entrance/exit. I feel sick about it. I had a great morning – every time I turned around I saw more critters.

      Like

  12. I’m happy that you got that last walk in… and took your camera along with the goodies for your friends. We are starting to open up beaches and parks here but all of the parking lots are closed. People seem to be maintaining distance fairly well so far. The beaches up the coast were shut down after a quick open because people didn’t behave themselves. Hopefully that was a good lesson learned so we’ll escape the same fate. I’m sorry that you’ll (and us too, for that matter) will miss watching the little ones grow. Hopefully you can get back soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Janis – I hope the Parks here in the City open up soon, especially my favorite go-to spot. I did hear about the controversy about your beaches last Friday I believe. I was interested because we have had much controversy here in Michigan with people storming the Capitol Building believing their rights were infringed upon. The walkers in the morning were not close to one another and that’s why I finally decided to take the camera. I was at a big park yesterday, about 8 miles away, and people were not masked, strangers walking close to one another and they have exercise equipment that looks like modern art sculptures and people were using it – go figure. I hope everything gets back to normal for you soon.

      Like

  13. Great shots, Linda! 🙂 I especially like the Downies! 🙂

    I think you are OK with your camera as long as you do not share it and especially if you wipe it with a lightly damped paper towel which contains a 10% solution of bleach to water. That is the solution of bleach that i use to disinfect my food items after i get them from Walmart Grocery Pickup once a week. I use a spray bottle and paper towels and go over everything very thoroughly. With the camera, of course, do not let moisture seep in. Only lightly dampen your camera paper towel.

    Keep snappin’! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks for the tip Tom! I was lucky on Friday morning – thank goodness I took the camera for that last Park visit for a while. I wiped it down with a diaper wipe and didn’t use it for a day and did the same thing last night as I went on a long walk with the camera yesterday at Elizabeth Park, which is much bigger and there were lots of people. Glad you liked the Downies – they were sweet and posed nicely for me. I hope to keep snappin’ and you do the same Tom.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’ll keep snappin’ but my thumbs are getting arthritic. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        My mom had a lot of arthritis in her fingers when she got older – she used to hang laundry out on the line from early April through November and bring sheets in frozen stiff! She used strong Motrin (600 mg or 800 mg – not sure now), and though she got cortisone shots in other surgically repaired joints, I don’t recall her getting them in her hands. Hope the weather is not detrimental for too long and messes up your picture-taking Tom.

        Like

  14. Rebecca says:

    Sorry to hear the park closed. You got some wonderful photos of the wildlife! The photo with the squirrel looking straight up at you is so cute!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I am upset it closed Rebecca and hope that it opens if the Governor’s Stay-a-Home Order is lifted on the 15th as she is planning on now. But since this was a City Order and not a State Order, her lifting it may not make a difference. That is Parker and he was trying to get my attention as I was watching and taking pictures of the goslings – he was insisting he was cute too!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rebecca says:

        And he was right. He’s adorable! 🙂 I know you are more than ready for all this to be over. We are beginning to open back up here, but I still feel better social distancing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, he is adorable Rebecca (and kind of knows it too). I will be happy for it to be over but we are not there yet and I fear it will be a long time. I am grateful to work from home and not have that worry on my mind as so many workers do once everything opens up and they must go back on site. I will continue to keep my distance and remain masked up as well.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Pam Lazos says:

    Aw, I’m so sorry, Linda. That’s tough for you. In the upside, the pictures of Harry, especially the third one, are fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Pam – I’m really unhappy about it. Our Governor is encouraging walks and to spend time outdoors and this was the Mayor of our City so I don’t even know if the parks will re-open once the Governor lifts the current Stay-at-Home Order which expires on May 15th. I think she’ll extend the Order and she already has such push back on all of her restrictions to date. Yesterday Congressman Paul Mitchell filed a lawsuit on behalf of the people of the State of Michigan, saying our Constitutional rights are affected by her actions. I am sure the other walkers aren’t happy either – most are retirees who walk 4-5 miles a day. I was lucky with Harry – usually approaching him from the other side causes him to bolt and make the most-awful screeching noise like I am trying to catch him!
      https://www.mlive.com/public-interest/2020/05/congressman-sues-whitmer-over-stay-home-orders-claims-constitutional-rights-violations.html

      Liked by 1 person

  16. susieshy45 says:

    Oh no!! I just knew of this today-hope Parker and others will be ok and manage with the dandelions.
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Oh, I’m glad you said about the dandelions Susie. I never thought of them eating them but they do – you remembered the picture from last year – whew. I am very worried about them. The grasscutters came yesterday. I walked by the park today, from the edges of the park, and saw the dandelions were all gone, sheared off from the grasscutters. When I walked by on Monday, they were still there. They cut the grass once a week. Hopefully they GROW back soon and I GO back soon. It is too cold for the squirrels to find their peanuts as the ground is frozen right now – we have a cold snap and a freeze warning the next few nights.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. dress up as a large bunny so you can sneak into the Park!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      There’s an idea Wayne – maybe on a gray day I could sneak in and still enjoy the Park and feed the furry and feathered friends. We have a group of walkers here in Michigan, though not near me, that dress up as animals and cartoon characters and walk through the neighborhoods.
      https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2020/04/25/ferndale-trex-walking-club-coronavirus/3025908001/

      Like

      • these days with wacky Republicans carrying guns I don’t think walking around dressed like a animal would be a good idea!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You’re right about that Wayne. I heard yesterday that there will now be a ban on all guns at Michigan’s Capitol Building – I would have thought there was already such a ban in place but guess not when everyone showed up with their long guns (not to mention the Confederate flags).

        Like

      • I have no idea what a southern flag is doing being flown in the north? They were enimies!
        Tell you what,put the shoe on the other foot………go down south and fly the Union flag! I bet I know what would happen and I’m pretty sure the search crew wouldn’t find your body!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Ha ha – Michigan’s Attorney General was interviewed today (she is a fairly new AG, a real feisty broad) and she said she was horrified to find people could carry long guns – you are permitted to carry a pistol if you have a permit when going into the Capitol Building. I was surprised to hear that – thought they would need to check them at the door. Yes, the flags are stirring up some problems – I saw two Confederate flags while walking in different ‘hoods. Michigan makes the news for all the wrong reasons lately!

        Like

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