Every dog has its day …

… and I’ve had a few doggos in my day too.

There was Fritzy, the German Shepherd …

… and Co-co, the Cocker Spaniel …

… and last, but not least, Peppy, the poodle.

Eventually my parents switched to birds for pets as they were more trainable … we never did know if it was them or us that was the problem as to puddles of piddle.

But I digress.

Today’s post is about the second virtual 5K Walk I did this year … this was the “Mutt Strut” to benefit FAMD, the acronym for the “Friends for Animals of Metro Detroit” which is a state-of-the-art, no-kill animal shelter located in Dearborn, Michigan used to provide temporary homes for dogs from the neighboring communities, including Detroit. If you’d care to see the photos from the 2019 event, just click here.

That was a fun event, geared for people and pooches to walk or run together and all funds raised benefited this worthwhile charity. Though I had no dog in the race/walk, I left thinking “ this was fun – I’ll do it again in 2020.” Well, as you might have guessed, the pandemic quashed that idea. But in mid-August I got an e-mail invitation to participate in the VIRTUAL Mutt Strut 2020.

Well “doggone it” I decided I’d do this 5K event.

I planned to take my walk in the same locale as last year, where we began at Ford Field Park in Dearborn, then trekked en masse through a neighborhood, along a busy shopping area of West Downtown Dearborn, over a wooden bridge that crossed the Rouge River and continued on the River Rouge Path all the way to Hines Park. Whew – it was a hot day and I’d have explored more of that Rouge Gateway Trail had I not already walked three miles at the duck pond with the mischievous Mallards and scenic covered bridge before embarking on this trek.

I did not pick up my tee-shirt in advance, since it was not a group event and also because it necessitated a visit to the shelter and nope, nope, nope – I was not going to do that and see or hear all those sweet animals looking for their “furever” home. I’m a bleeding heart and it’s just too tough on me to lose pets. I won’t make that mistake again of loving an animal so deeply that it tears a hole in my heart once they are gone. I know people say that my mindset is wrong and I am 100% sure I could open up my heart and home to a shelter pet … but for now, I have the squirrels.

Here we go … happy trails for happy tails!

I began my solo virtual trek at Ford Field Park, then, after a short hop through the ‘hood, this overlook behind Andiamo’s Restaurant offered a great vantage point to peer down into the Rouge River.

Well, I may have laid out that trek in my mind, but once I began walking, I realized the original plan was not going to work. There was construction, so I had to walk a few blocks out of my way, which gave me a chance to see the Dearborn Historical Society/Museum (the outside anyway).

At the side of the Museum was the Rosie the Riveter Memorial Rose Garden and a few of their prized specimens.

The roses were fragrant in the humid air. Behind the Museum was a herb garden.

Next, I headed up to Michigan Avenue and through the business district which yielded to another overlook which put me onto the Rouge River Gateway Trail.

Well, still another obstacle in this course presented itself – so much for heading over this footbridge and walking past Henry and Clara Ford’s extensive estate. While I was game, there was caution tape just beyond the bridge since there was construction being done on the trail.

No worries … I took another path and was treated to a woodsy paved walking/bike trail.

I ended up walking about seven miles that day, far exceeding the required 3.2 miles/5 kms in the Virtual Mutt Strut. I am including the photo of my tee-shirt; there was no finishing medal offered for the virtual gig.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
This entry was posted in 5K events, nature, walk, walking and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Every dog has its day …

  1. Sartenada says:

    Hi Linda.

    Wonderful photos with great variety. Your dogs are cute! I have had two dogs. From the second I dog, I have no photos, but the first one, I have couple of photos in my about-me-page.

    Have a great day!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Matti. They were cute dogs and there were no more after Peppy. My parents said we did not have luck training them – birds were easier to have as pet and we had two parakeets and two canaries. I just went to your About-Me page and I looked through, but I remembered as I scrolled through that I must come back because I was overwhelmed just how many photos you had. I will go back, I promise, and I did see “Hunter and his dog” which was interesting as they were wooden and carved by a chainsaw.

      Have a great day Matti.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Sandra J says:

    I love those older photos, Fritzy looked way bigger than you. And I still love that silver Christmas tree in the one photo. And what you do for all the animals in the park is a passion of love for animals. They are lucky to have you bringing them food. It is always so hard to loose a pet.
    I had a successful herb garden, be it a small one a couple years ago. I will have to try that again next summer. I love the smell of basil and sage.
    They made very nice shirts for the walkers. Wonderful post today as always.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the post Sandra … I thought I would put my own dogs in this post since there were no dogs to spotlight like I did in last year’s event. Fritzy was a puppy when we got him and he grew very quickly to that size … I think he was like having a small pony around. 🙂

      Thank you – I get a lot of enjoyment from my furry friends at the Park. Today was not so great though, because I went around one loop and the second time around that loop, a huge hawk was honing in on a black squirrel who was munching peanuts and oblivious to the hawk. He swooped down as another squirrel made a screechy noise and the black squirrel saw the hawk and just made it up the tree and the hawk did a fast turn away from the area. I felt sick. The hawk, with its big wingspan, zoomed over to the fence and sat there like it was pouting and kept staring at the tree. Squirrel was up in the tree, shaking like a leaf.

      They’ve taken the picnic tables away from the pavilion for the first time in years … they used to put them in a fenced-in area all Winter. I hope they just took them away to be repainted (but they could have done that there) … I used to put peanuts and treats on the table in advance of when I knew I would be gone due to snowy/icy/rainy days. I knew the hawk would not go there and the squirrels hid underneath the tables if they saw it. The episode made me uneasy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I have never seen a hawk go after a squirrel, I have seen them catching mice out in the fields.. Maybe putting the treats right at the bottom of the trees, that way they can scurry around it or up it quickly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It happened pretty quickly Sandra and I have been doing that especially now that it is so dark in the morning – I don’t get down there so early. When I’m early like in the Summer months or on a weekend, I often hang out near them when I put down peanuts and I’ll take photos of them, so the hawk(s) won’t come near. The hawks disappeared for awhile, but are back. I put the peanuts near shrubs or a tree – sometimes the squirrels drag them away to go hide them. I felt horrible watching that hawk, but the squirrel escaped. It happened a few years ago too … I had just fed Stubby, the squirrel with half a tail. And I turned away and the hawk swooped down – Stuffy ran under the pavilion roof and a picnic table. The hawk took off and landed on the fence, just like it did yesterday. Waiting and watching for the squirrel to appear on the path again for an easy grab. Big wing span – they flap their wings quite fast while swooping, then flying away. I was uneasy after being there.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. We never had a dog, My youngest son always wanted one. At one time he had a rock with a hole in it and a bit of string on it which he walked! Due to the nature of our employment, it would not been fair to have a dog which would be alone all day. I do wonder what it may be like now we have retired having a dog, Love your memory god photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      After the poodle, that was it for dogs – my parents were not successful training those dogs. My aunt had two dogs, housebroken days after she got them. You are correct – it is not good to leave the dog alone all day – they pine for companionship and begin to chew things in boredom – their paws, the furniture. When you travel, you can take the dog in your camper van, but not on daily trips to the shore as the birds may be scared. Thank you Andy – my parents took a lot of pics of me growing up as I was an only child.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Congratulations on completeing the virtual Mutt Strut! It was nice that your detours turned up some great photo opportunities. My favorite is the tree trunk with the patch of missing bark and the small red leaf accents — lovely composition. I’ve only had one dog in my life, our family pet, besides all the cats, was a Shetland Sheepdog named Skipper. ♡ It’s interesting your family had three different kinds of dogs. A lot of people I know keep getting their favorite breed over and over again. I have a fear of large dogs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Barbara – it was a nice walk the first time, so I tried to recreate it. It was a lot quieter with no dogs along the route this year. I did like that Rouge River Gateway Trail and explored it thanks to the detour on that footbridge. That one tree with the missing bark and red leaves in the background, with one laying on the path, were nice finds in the woods – otherwise everything was green and rather nondescript and not a single bird or squirrel.

      The Shetland Sheepdogs are beautiful – they remind me of Lassie, the collie, which TV show I never missed when I was a youngster. A friend of mine has had Golden Retrievers all her life. She has raised them and tracks with them … she does not attend as many competitions now, as a competitor or as a judge, since she is older, but at one time had 12 or 14 dogs at her house. A friend of hers passed away and everyone in the “tracking world” who knew that woman took a few dogs of hers to live with them, so they didn’t go to shelters. My friend took four of those dogs as she lives in a rural area in Canada so has plenty of space in and around her home. I have a fear of pit bulls. We have a lot of them that people keep as watch dogs – I am afraid they will get away from their property, jump/climb the fence and attack me, especially when walking through the neighborhoods.

      Like

      • Shetland sheepdogs are also known as miniature collies. My husband had golden retrievers while growing up, many fond memories there. That was so good of your friend to take some of her friend’s dogs in after she died.

        Sadly, your fear of pit bulls is justified. A year doesn’t go by in this area where one doesn’t escape and harm a passerby. Very scary. And there was one case where a pit bull attacked a woman’s grandchildren while they were asleep in her house. I know some of them are well-trained and good-natured but how are we to know? I had a friend who was a mail carrier and she carried pepper spray with her on her route. Fortunately she never had to use it but it was unnerving dropping mail into slots with a pit bull snarling and growling on the other side of the door, or lunging at the glass alongside the door.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I didn’t know they were miniature collies Barbara – they sure are beautiful and I am sure I saw some at last year’s event. I saw many breeds at the Mutt Strut last year, some which I’d only seen photos of only, like the Giant Alaskan Malamutes, or the Bull Mastiff. I asked what type of dogs they were as I took pictures of them.

        I’ve attended a Butterfly Garden Walk the past few years and the event is organized by a woman who is active with various animal shelters. It is held in her backyard which is full of perennials and annuals, a pond and is an official Monarch Way ‘Station. One of her pet projects is collie rescue. She did not have the event this year due to the pandemic which is unfortunate – you don’t pay money to take the tour, just “pay” in donations like dog/cat food, treats or paper towels, paper plates, items which she puts out as “want items” on her Facebook page and they usually do a story in the local online newspaper. All items go to various local shelters.

        I carry pepper spray and gel but don’t know how much good it will do. In the Neighborhood Forum I do read of attacks on small dogs, children and people fighting off those attacks are often severely injured. We had a brutal attack of three pit bulls on a teenager riding her bike last year … her younger brother was with her and witnessed the brutal attack. I walk through the neighborhoods for extra steps – I could drive too and just walk more there at the Park, but on a weekday, it takes time to pull the car in/out of the garage and my car is hooked up to a trickle charger so I have to undo the cords, etc. In the Summer, it’s not too bad as I have lots of time to spare – this time of year, the sun takes too long to rise. I always scan the Forum to see if any are on the loose, then I drive.

        I feel badly for your friend. Suggest she carry pepper gel. It will not blow back into her eyes if there is any wind … the same company (Sabre) makes the gel. You can go on http://www.sabrered.com to see where you may buy it in her area, or I just checked and it is available on Amazon.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Ron Walker says:

    What a wonderful trek you had. I loved the pictures, and the cause was a great one. I’m 68 and cried like a baby, when my pet rat passed away a couple of months ago. She was my buddy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it was nice there and very woodsy, so the colors should be beautiful right now. This shelter only used to take in dogs from the City of Dearborn (which is very large), but they saw the need to expand as there are so many strays and people giving pets up, especially now as times are tough. I felt for you when I read that post Ron. I had my canary Buddy euthanized in December 2016 after he had a stroke. I was just beside myself and he was my companion, sitting just six feet away in his cage, as I have worked from home since 2011. The loss is great and despite the joy from pets, I won’t go down that sad road again.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ally Bean says:

    Your t-shirt is cute. The photos of the roses are lovely. You do get around when you go out for a walk, I’ll say that. It’s fun to go along with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I liked the logo for this t-shirt too Ally. A similar design as last year, but last year’s was bright yellow. I have to say I did not deny myself any long treks on the weekends and between walks and taking pictures, I did not get a whole lot of work done around the house. Glad you enjoyed tagging along … I am switching to Fall walks now. I still have a few Summer photos to use, maybe over the Winter.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. ruthsoaper says:

    As much as dogs need furever families they also need people like you, Linda, who give financial support to the rescues and shelters. The three dogs that we’ve had that have been adopted from the shelter have been such good and loving pets. I always recommend rescue pets to those looking for a new family member. Your beautiful photos were the icing on the cake that day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you for saying that Ruth. This is a good cause and it was originally a shelter just for Dearborn dogs, but they saw the need to take in dogs from local cities including Detroit. The need is worse right now with so many people losing jobs, or even their homes. I know that if I wanted to get a dog, I’d choose a shelter first like you have – I know a few other people who have gone that route and received unconditional love from the dogs they adopted. Glad you liked the photos too. This was a long and winding trail and I spoke to a few bicyclists who told me they went all along Hines Drive and took a round trip and it was beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. It was a good charity to walk for and you did walk a lot!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Margy says:

    I am a bit jealous of your lovely walking location. It is snowing here… I walked the daughter’s dog today, but the temp was barely above freezing. The dog loved it, but dog has a really long fur coat.
    Dog comes to visit us about once a week (with the daughter, of course). It is a perfect way to have a dog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      We have had a nice October so far – a little cold the first week, but nice and clear, so I just bundle up. I took the bus to downtown Detroit for almost 30 years so have accumulated a lot of warm outerwear, so I don’t mind … it is the snow and ice that I do mind. I don’t like driving in it, and once it is icy, I only walk if the pavement is clear and dry. Sometimes the path at Council Point Park is plowed, not always, so I walk on the grassy parts if that is the case. A fellow blogger is enjoying her “grand dog” who has been visiting with her son … I agree, that is the best way to have a dog.

      Like

  10. Joni says:

    A wonderful walk Linda! You have such scenic parks. And I enjoyed seeing the old photos too and your pretty wardrobe!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this walk Joni. It would have been a gorgeous walk today as we are at peak colors here in the area. Unfortunately that park is right near a major construction area and today they closed the main artery to get there until Sunday night. Next year I’m going to go there during peak colors – it was dense, but a paved trail … can’t get lost that way! We are lucky to have so many parks – this bike/walking trail goes through Hines Park which encompasses several cities.

      I am surprised there weren’t more pictures taken with these dogs and Skippy … I should have put his name. He was a fun parakeet, talked a blue streak. In the first picture I had a pony tail and my mom said if I kept squirming, she would cut it off … I squirmed and she took me with her next time she went for a haircut. I am betting you had similar clothes since we are the same age. Those were the days … sigh. I am really behind here and not in Reader for three days – hopefully will catch up some tomorrow. I hate being so behind.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Laurie says:

    What a great walk for a wonderful cause. And you got a pretty T-shirt too.I know exactly what you mean about having a hole torn in your heart when a beloved pet dies. Right now, I can’t imagine getting another dog, although I do miss having one around. They are such good companions. I loved seeing photos of you with your assortment of dogs as you grew up. As I waas reading the post, I was wondering if you walked more than 3.1 miles that day. & miles?!?! You are an overachiever! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Laurie, I know your heart was torn apart with the loss of your beloved Benji a few months ago. I felt like that when I lost Buddy in 2016. Pets have such an impact on our lives and leave such a void when they depart. I know the house is too quiet and I have no one to fuss over like I did with him, so now I have the squirrels who don’t mind being adopted.

      We did have an assortment of dogs … Frizy had hip dysplasia which is common with Shepherds and was euthanized. Co-co the Cocker Spaniel did not last more than a year as he could not be housebroken – my mom got frustrated with him. Peppy ran away, dug a hole under the fence and escaped and ate some rat poison. It was a fairly new subdivision and not all houses had fences and there were a few dogs roaming around and going in people’s yards – someone put out rat poison, Peppy got into it. He came home foaming at the mouth and had to be euthanized … this after it took a very very long time to get him housebroken. My parents said “we’re done with dogs.” I did go above and beyond the regular 5K amount as I walked around Ford Field Park (with those mallards at the pond) then went through Hines Park afterward. I deserved two finishing medals! They gave out medals at the Fish & Loaves 5K likely because it was held at the same time frame if it had been “live” and they had already ordered them with 2020 on the medal. This 5K was four months later than the usual date, so I guess they just decided to forego them. I liked the shirt too – last year’s was bright yellow.

      Like

  12. More miles for your annual goal combined with a good cause and beautiful scenery make for a picture perfect post! Loosing a pet is always difficult. I still get sad when I think of our last dog who died over 16 years ago. Some day I’d like to get another one, but the time has to be right. They need to be part of the family and hate being kenneled when one travels. Once we figure out what’s next in our future we might start to think about it. Until then I’ll enjoy seeing our “granddogter” Dingo. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, we had a good Summer weather-wise Sabine, though it was hot, but not a lot of rain. I racked up a lot of miles that way.
      Today, the weather folks were wrong and it rained all day. I went through all the local pictures I took over the last three weeks to spin into posts and should be good through November. Did one for tomorrow and Wednesday. That took me most of today and I tried to get caught up in Reader – now only one day behind thankfully. I know dogs are such good companions and it is heartbreaking to lose any pet so I avoid that heartache by not getting another one. A fellow blogger has a missing cat … been missing 10 days and somehow escaped out the door. He’s upset about it and it’s not chipped unfortunately. I like that word “granddogter” – very clever. What kind of dog is Dingo?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dingo is a German Shepard and Shar Pei mix. She was a rescue! Pets of any variety become members of the family. Our neighbors third cat went missing too. Probably coyotes. They left them outside much of the time. We are supposed to get more rain here as well. I’ve got a few more outside chores to do this week and I’ve been working very slowly on my photographs. It sure is time consuming!
        Stay safe and happy continued walking, Linda!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Is Dingo tall like a German Shepherd or shorter like a Shar Pei? That is an interesting mix. Pets bring a lot of love – it is always better to go to a shelter to give them a chance at a loving home. It’s so sad reading about abandoned pets, but often there are pets whose owners must move to a nursing home, or pass away and they’re taken to a shelter. I feel for them all. The coyotes are problematic in our rural areas in another county about 25 miles from here. Small dogs and cats are prey for coyotes who largely ignore humans. The photographs are very time consuming. I thought I would never finish the photos on the card, all from the compact camera. You stay safe too Sabine – I lost a walk today to a steady rain, second day in a row unfortunately.

        Like

  13. What a nice 5K walk Linda. I’m with you on losing pets. My last dog I had to put to sleep about ripped my heart out. Why is it so much harder to lose them as we get older? It looks like you had some amazing pets growing up!

    Like

  14. found a place where you can get your next Buddy! They rescued a 100 Parrots and are trying to find them homes.
    https://globalnews.ca/video/7406052/b-c-bird-sanctuary-that-rescued-100s-of-parrots-struggling

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s