Mornings are a bit amiss at Council Point Park.

Autumn arrived without skipping a beat, even though life, as we’ve always known it, seems to take stranger twists and turns daily. But in 2020, the leaves still fall, as do the temperatures. We still reach for a coat to ward off the chill and search for our hats and gloves … just in case we need ‘em. But gone are the hayrides and corn mazes this year, although we can still enjoy cider (maybe even donuts) and similarly feast on Mother Nature’s eye candy, those glorious leaf colors – to me, this is what Autumn is all about.

I always have my compact digital camera within easy reach, so last Sunday, when it poured raining the entire day (grrr), it gave me a much-needed chance to check out the photo card which I hoped was groaning with awesome Autumn shots. You already saw those cutie pie squirrels and cunning Blue Jays, all clamoring for and devouring peanuts and the (too) many signs around the ‘hood these days. I’ve also collected some harvest décor display pictures which define this too-short season – they’ll be in a post in November as I have some Halloween pics to share first. I do love Autumn, even if clouds are on the horizon … those clouds being snow and ice. The cold temps I’m fine with, just not the icky precip.

Since I last did a post about Council Point Park, the transition to Fall began with bushes suddenly bountiful with vibrant berries, snatched by eager Robins, who bemoaned the cooler weather and wondered if their worm supply has suddenly become freeze-dried.

Tinges of red and yellow on raggedy bushes and saplings along the Ecorse Creek made for a pretty backdrop in the morning sun.

And the many Maple trees slowly began to turn beautiful shades of gold.

It’s been an interesting month at my favorite hangout and with each passing day, more thoughts and comments crowded my brain, until I knew I just had to commit them to a blog post.

Like this funny item I noticed. Someone was feeding the critters veggies from their garden. One day it was a large green cabbage and a couple of red peppers. I had not taken the camera that day as it looked like rain, but the next day, the remaining split-open red pepper made a nice spot of color in this tiny alcove.

This is the same sweet gray squirrel that gave me multiple poses; he was eyeing peanuts, not the red pepper below.

But there were other changes afoot in and around the Park besides veggies … some were/are annoying or worrisome.

One morning as I started on the perimeter path, in the distance I saw big orange signs. I strained to see across the Park, and, while I could not read the signs, I saw a tree-cutting service and a couple of tree cutters hard at work. The signs were to beware of the machinery. We walkers were forced to veer off the path onto the wet grass to avoid getting too close to the wood chipper, which was busy gobbling up branches and saplings.

The two or three times I walked past them, the workers were tackling the growth of straggly-looking bushes along the banks of the Ecorse Creek. “Good” I thought, thinking I’d have a better view of the waterfowl who frequent the Creek, without my having to climb down close to the edge where it’s often slick. I must admit I wondered about lopping off this branch?

But my happiness over the potential better view was short-lived, because the next day I quickly noticed several nice trees had been chopped down. Unfortunately, none were the long-dead tree you see overlooking the Creek …

… but instead, one was this Common Juniper where a Golden-crowned Kinglet had its nest and trilled its tinny-sounding notes to me on bitter cold Winter mornings. The Juniper berries take three years to ripen to a bluish color, then they provide some sustenance for our Park birds. A small branch with a few ripe and unripe berries was left behind after the tree was felled.

This is all that remains now of the Juniper – I hope that Kinglet had a Plan “B” for the family.

A little farther along on the path, I stared in disbelief at the twin stumps of two Redbud trees, similarly cut to the ground by the tree cutters. The remnants of the Redbud trees left me in dismay.

This spot was a favorite hangout for the geese and their goslings every May and photos of it were often featured in my Spring blog posts. Since the Park was closed this May due to the pandemic, I dug into my blog media files to show you this lovely tree.

The next time I saw fellow walker Arnie, we collectively shook our heads, lamenting over the loss of these two trees, which we both have passed for many years while walking at this venue. All we could say was “why … such a loss.” He said they should have let an arborist pick and choose what trees to remove as those trees were an asset, not a hindrance and would never have gotten so large that their roots would have been destructive.

In early September, I shared the path when the local cross-county teams began running every morning. I took a few photos of them as they passed me by on their morning practice sessions. One day I went to the Park and there were painted lines everywhere, i.e. across and encircling the perimeter path and running across the “donut hole” (the grassy area between each walking loop). I learned the painted lines were in advance of a cross-county meet. The event is long gone, but white paint remains, competing with the ever-growing graffiti.

There is scuttlebutt in the Facebook Neighborhood Forum that the City is looking into turning my favorite nature nook into a dog park, or portioning it off for a miniature golf course. Well, I may not be able to vote as I’m not a citizen of this country, but I fired off a message to a mayoral candidate asking if we could not utilize any of the other 21 parks in this City for those two ventures and keep this natural setting intact? I hope the points I shared are taken into consideration. Council Point Park actually prohibits domestic animals on the premises; a sign with an ordinance and fine info is posted at the entrance of the Park. However, the ordinance has never been enforced and dog walkers blitz past the sign, then you get this … a dog which terrorizes the squirrels on a near-daily basis.

Well – what are you going to do? I had been standing feeding and taking photos of the squirrels and Jays on the path (pictures that were the subject of this past Monday’s post) – they all quickly scattered to the wind when they saw this dog. But, as you see above, one squirrel scrambled up the high chain-link fence and was trembling.

It’s not just the dogs at the park … the Cooper’s Hawks have returned (sigh).

Much to my chagrin, the Cooper’s Hawks have made an encore performance at Council Point Park, bringing with them the sad predator versus prey scenario to contend with, something that fills this bleeding heart with worry. A few years ago, my first encounter with one was directly after feeding Stubby, the Fox squirrel missing half his tail, and, just as I whirled around to resume my walk, suddenly a brownish blob was in my peripheral vision. With talons outstretched and an artful dip and dive, that hawk honed in on Stubby, whose only thought at that time was enjoying his pile of peanuts on a beautiful Summer morning. The hawk was also thinking about breakfast. Just then I screamed “oh no” and Stubby dropped a peanut and ran as fast as his four legs could carry him, diving under a picnic table for shelter and the hawk angrily sped away.

After that occasion, (wherein I was likely more horror-stricken than Stubby), it taught me that unless I have some extra time to kill and can hang out on the path with my peanut pals, I must try to put the peanuts near the base of a tree or a bush for their easy access and getaway.

The other morning, the same scenario played out before my eyes when a black squirrel, happily noshing on nuts, was blissfully oblivious as a Cooper’s Hawk sped past me, swooped down, its huge wings flapping silently as it aimed for the squirrel. This time it was not me that cried out, but a nearby squirrel sounded the “alarm cry” (a loud noise that resembles a caterwaul) in the nick of time for that little fellow to beat a hasty retreat. The hawk did an about face, flew over to the chain-link fence where it pouted and glared at the Town Crier. I didn’t have the camera out and was a bit too shaken up to drag it out for a photo of the hawk who took off a few moments later. I was uneasy the rest of my walk and ended up leaving instead of going around another time on the loop.

And finally, there’s this. For some reason the picnic tables have been removed at the pavilion.

The City’s Parks and Recreation workers used to move the picnic tables to a fenced-in area every year as Winter approached. The last two or three years, the workers left them under the pavilion roof all year around. There are no organized Winter activities at the Park where people might want to bring food and/or hot drinks and sit a while, but the tables were a boon to me as I placed peanuts and treats, including birdseed bells and sunflower seeds, even cookies, for the squirrels and birds, especially when the weather forecast was for prolonged periods of ice or snow and I might not be around. So, I don’t know what’s up with that as the picnic tables are MIA for two weeks – perhaps off being refinished from the last round of graffiti?

Other than these blips on the radar at my favorite nature nook, life goes on … the crisp leaves crinkle and crunch beneath my heavy walking shoes and when it rains, those same wet leaves plaster themselves to the soles of my shoes, sometimes riding up the sides as well.

I’ve watched the crescendo of color for the last few weeks – below is an array of leaf colors encountered recently at Council Point Park; this past week was considered peak time for leaf colors here in Southeast Michigan.

I look forward to the time change on November 1st allowing me to bulk up my steps with the added daylight.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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53 Responses to Mornings are a bit amiss at Council Point Park.

  1. Your photos are gorgeous, as always. Autumn colors never fall to please. You had mysteries to share — good trees removed and picnic tables MIA. Happy Fall!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne – Autumn is hands down the most beautiful season with its gorgeous colors. I never thought of that angle of mysteries in writing this post … it would have been perfect for the Halloween season and what’s happening there. There are some disappointments to be sure. This morning we have fog, but the rain has finally stopped, but we will have a storm later today with high winds and torrential rain as well. Those beautiful leaves are likely all on the ground now.

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      • We were riding in the mountains today, and the trees were lovely.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It is a beautiful time of year – I see photos of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the colors are exquisite. Some enterprising business has opened the ski lifts for leaf peepers to see the colorful trees below – now that would be an awesome sight. The Park was still at peak color this morning, but we had a wicked storm in the 4:00 o’clock hours, with possible tornadic conditions, and I’m sure the wind ripped the rest of the leaves off. It was gusting mightily out there.

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      • Leaves never last long enough.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        No – I was at Council Point Park today and was sure all the leaves would be off the trees given the strong winds and torrential rain, but the Park didn’t look any worse for the wear. So, we’re past peak color and the yellows and reds were vibrant enough to take more photos.

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  2. I love your leaf photos! So many tree losses — I’m so sorry they took down some of your favorite ones. Sometimes there seems to be no rhyme or reason to how they decide which trees to eliminate. That happens around here, too. Change is inevitable, I suppose, but sometimes I wish there were more dog-free parks and areas. It doesn’t seem right that the owner allows his/her dog to terrorize the squirrels like that. Sigh. Anyhow, you taught me something new today, that Juniper berries take three years to ripen to a bluish color. I’ve often wondered about the white ones…

    Liked by 3 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked them Barbara – the header image was interesting as the grass blades showed through the one leaf as the sun shone on it. The leaves were peak colors in SE Michigan for that photo and still were yesterday, but likely, after tonight’s storms, they are littering the ground at the Park now. Perhaps a few wet leaves pictures could be taken now. I don’t understand the tree cutting at all. Neither tree was huge nor that close to the path to cause the asphalt to buckle.

      I learn some little nature tidbits from Arnie, the older walker at the Park. He grew up near a forest and spent a lot of time prowling around in it and a nearby pond as a youngster, so he identifies some trees, bushes and birds, like that Kinglet, and the American Black Ducks I saw and photographed there the day the Park closed on May 1st. He told me about the Juniper berries – I didn’t know that people pick them for crushing into marinades and also for gin. I see white berries at the Park sometimes too. I don’t I.D. berries either unless I’m sure what it is. Last year I saw pretty flowers on a bush in the Fall. I took photos of them and a walker pulled a small branch off, caught up with me and asked what they were. I didn’t know, so asked in a post – it was Autumn Clematis. The guy and dog were there again this morning, right after I walked around the loop the first time, so I walked on the other loop (nothing interesting there). It interrupts the peace of the morning.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The sunlight does do lovely things with the leaves this time of year. Arnie sounds a lot like my father. I wish I could remember all the things he taught me about nature and science. Grrr… I hope the guy and his dog get tired of your park and go somewhere else soon!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I loved the grass blades shadow behind and lighting up the yellows. Gorgeous! I do enjoy talking with Arnie … a treasure trove of info. He is an avid bicyclist and goes on that path that goes between three Metroparks that I think I mentioned to you before … it is 49 miles round trip. I am not sure if he goes just on a portion – thinking that might be so. He goes along as his wife has some back problems. I’d say he is in his late 70s/early 80s. That is enjoying your retirement in simple ways … immersing yourself in nature. I hope that will be me down the road.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Eliza says:

    I enjoyed all the pictures. I hope your email helps… the lost trees are sad…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve seen that too where they take down a wonderful tree and keep half dead junk ones stand. I’ve seen neighbors do it. Across the street they had a wonderful arbor with a wisteria vine on it. It was stunning in bloom and it wasn’t “dirty.” (People here use that term to mean dropped leaves.) I asked the home owner why they took it down. She said a bird was nesting in it every year and pooped. I was flabbergasted. All birds poop. All creatures including people poop. It wasn’t over her porch or an area that mattered. I wondered if she knew how many critters peed on her grass.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I shake my head every day, between the neighborhood and the Park. No rhyme or reason to chop down these trees at the Park and they have long-dead memorial trees, which are near the path and should be removed – but they removed these. Even if they are memorial trees that people once paid $75.00 for, they are not coming back to life. The same thing happened in my neighborhood with a neighbor’s wisteria vine. He had that vine for decades and trained to climb over a huge redwood arbor. It was a sight to see every Spring when it bloomed the first time, sometimes a second time. He died and his wife sold the house – the new neighbor ripped it out and left the redwood arbor, doing nothing with it, letting it rot away. It was a corner house, so I could see it perfectly.

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  5. Ally Bean says:

    I’ve no real explanation for why some trees remain, while other trees like the ones you enjoy, are cut down. It is one of those weird mysteries of public parks, although the cynic in me wonders if the wood from the good trees is going home with someone who likes to build tables, bookcases. Probably not, but it would explain why ratty trees remain while pretty ones disappear.

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    • Linda Schaub says:

      I am cynical too about these trees too Ally. I am not a tree hugger, but this was rather destructive in my opinion. Meanwhile, memorial trees which people paid $75.00 for a decade or so ago, have died and they are not removed. Perhaps that is because they are that person’s property, but dead trees should be removed. On my route from home to the Park, I pass a church where a woman parishioner has taken care of the large garden and pruning the bushes for years. I went by there the other day and someone has taken a rototiller to 3/4s of that garden … a small area where the listing angel was is all that remains. I didn’t see the woman there all Summer and this church has no A/C, so they do not hold church there in the Summer months. They use an air-conditioned hall somewhere. I don’t know if plowing up the garden was because the gardener/volunteer lost interest or what, but it seemed like a waste to me. I mention this garden as you/I discussed the large garden of tulips, which are now gone.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………….thank you for all of the colorful and nice pictures of your favorite nook in the “hood”…………………………………I miss that park ……………………………..I’m sorry about the trees being cut down and WHO decides which to cut and which to stay behind………………………..Say “NO” to the dog park they did that to our apartment basketball court and NOW no dogs go there!!!………………………for the apartments it was just a sales pitch to get new residents who have dogs to come in………………………….all the new people who have a dog now never that I know of go into that park!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’m glad you liked the photos Ann Marie – this past week was peak color for leaves which are now likely here, there and everywhere after that storm we had at 4:45 p.m. The trees in the ‘hood were swaying like crazy.

      If you remember a woman who roller skated at the Park from when you were still walking there, I took photos of her once and asked her e-mail address and sent them to her. She e-mails me every so often and e-mailed me specifically to tell me what was going on as she follows the City Council meetings. She wrote to complain and give her opinion and knew I would write too. I hope they don’t do a dog park, nor miniature golf either. That’s a shame that happened at your apartment Ann Marie – I would not think they would allow a dog to begin with. I hope they never mess with your pond – that would be horrid!

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  7. Gorgeous colors this year as you beautiful pictures show. What a shame about the tree’s Linda. Red Buds have branches that die off and can easily fall. I have 3 redbuds and one has half the tree dead. Maybe they took that one down for safety? Do you think the picnic tables were pulled because of the virus?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Diane – our peak for colors was this past week. I was surprised that all the leaves were not whipped off the trees yesterday during that storm – they still looked pretty good. I didn’t know that about the Redbud tree Diane – maybe that is why they removed it? It didn’t look diseased and there were twin stumps for some reason. It made a great background for the geese/goslings. I am not sure about the picnic tables – the first 3-4 years I walked at this Park, they dragged them into a fenced-in area near the parking lot. So I don’t “get” this unless they wanted to refinish/repaint them offsite, then return them. Today I saw another Cooper’s Hawk go after a squirrel at the Park, but he/she got away. Not happy about that and no tables to put food safely on. I used to leave extra birdseed bells, peanuts, etc.

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  8. Sartenada says:

    Stunning autumn leaves! The area where you live is very beautiful and offers very much to admire for those who love Mother Nature’s wonders. Happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked these bright colors Matti. I love Autumn for that very reason! I was at the same Park yesterday and was surprised the wind did not destroy the leaves, although there were many littered around. I took lots of pictures … will sort them out in the next week or so. Mother Nature and her Autumn palette are enjoyable for the eyes, even though we know Winter is on the way.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Sandra J says:

    Makes you wonder who decides to change the landscapes of the parks, I always think how long it took for that tree to grow and they just cut it down. I watched an area around this town, where they went in a huge corner lot, cut all the trees down and leveled the ground to put a new car lot in. This dealer already had a car lot in town, but they wanted to be in the new suburb part of town. What a waste of land and trees to me. But, people do not think of the environment anymore, they cover the land with cement. I loved all the mixture of colors, the colors are kind of scarce around here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was sad and angry too Sandra. I went there yesterday and I was standing in one area for a long time feeding the squirrels. I am very concerned for the hawk(s) and so I put out a bunch of peanuts, but stayed with them for a long time, sometimes taking pictures, sometimes just looking around. There is no rhyme or reason as to what they did with the trees, even the bushes. Those saplings and raggedy bushes may not have amounted to much but they helped provide cover for the birds and squirrels from predators like the hawks and nests for each of those species. After the hawk near-attack again yesterday, I must come up with a plan to feed them since the picnic tables are now gone … that was a safe haven for the squirrels as they could grab peanuts, go under the tables if need be and the peanuts stayed dry. We still had some color yesterday – but we have rain off/on most of the week again which will likely cause more leaves to drop. I took a lot of photos yesterday of the leaves on the ground – not as many leaves as in your recent picture though. It was desolate looking with the park bench among the leaves.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I know what you mean, there was the most beautiful bush right outside of my house along the bike path, a perfect shape, I have so many photos of it for every season. And this year they cut it down in the spring. Well, it is growing back but it lost its shape and it looks like a big weed right now. There was no reason to cut that one down either.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is so annoying to me. Same thing – why cut it down at all unless it is diseased? I just don’t understand that any more than what has happened here. Keith, the blogger who I got the info on the sandhill cranes for you, lives across from a golf course. So he has gets some beautiful sunsets with an unobstructed view. There was a bush that was heart-shaped. He used to photograph the bush with the orangey sun in the background – looked like the bush was on fire – gorgeous. Then one day he came home from work, they cut it down. He was upset.

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  10. Laurie says:

    So saad about the juniper and redbud trees! At the linear park down below my house, they sometimes cut down trees, then plant other trees at almost the same spot. It makes me wonder if there really is a plan at all. Beautiful fall photos, Linda. I hope your favorite nature area does not get turned into a golf course or a dog park!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it sure makes me sad too Laurie. I had to show what that beautiful redbud tree looked like before it was removed – I thought it was a waste. I’ve not seen any replacement trees yet – they’ve not removed the stumps yet. That is another strange thing – they never remove the stumps and often leave the felled, cut-up trees there – in a large woodsy area, that works and I see that all the time, but this is not a large woodsy area. Glad you liked the Fall photos – I took some more yesterday when I was there. Colors are not so vibrant, but still pretty. I am hoping they leave the Park intact – it is a jewel in this City. A natural setting in the middle of a residential area.

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  11. normally trees are only cut down because they are rotting. Those stumps look perfectly fine. I see no signs of rot what so ever. So they were not cut down because they were diseased.
    So I wonder why? Might be political as everything this year is!
    You should get one of those silent dog whistles. You know that only dogs can hear. When you see a dog going after one of your squirrels….Blow it! It might distract and give your furry friends a better chance of escaping!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You are right – I saw nothing wrong with the trees either and from the rings you see they’ve been there a while. The great smell of the Juniper on a humid morning … sigh. Makes no sense at all! I never thought of of using a silent dog whistle to alert the squirrels – that is an excellent idea! Today, my last stop of the day was Council Point Park and I’m trying to herd them to a very wide Weeping Mulberry tree where they can eat and be protected. The trouble is, they run to bury their peanuts – eat some, bury others … I try to stand there to ward off the hawk(s) if possible.

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      • stand guard with a paint ball gun!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’d be afraid Mr. Hawk may make me his prey!

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      • Hawks never bite of more than they can chew….besides your way to big!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well, that’s good to know … whew, I won’t worry then! I know I’ve shared this story with some people – did I mention our neighbor across the street with their maple tree? A Blue Jay built a nest in the tree, had young in the nest and a man walking down the street walked under the nest. The Jay flew down and attacked him. He was bald-headed and the Jay pecked at his head, drawing blood and kept pecking him and he fell to the ground, blood everywhere. The neighbor called for an ambulance and the police. He came back later to thank her for calling the police. This was many many years ago – long before cellphones that he could call himself. Scary isn’t it!

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      • yes,birds do become more territorial while nesting and I’m sure you would as well If the tables were turned.
        A Newfy friend of mine hates Crows as one had attacked her years ago. It sounded like the same scenario,nest close by.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        The neighbor who called the ambulance/police told my mom he had blood running down his head and face and was out of it from all the pecking by that Jay. Amazing. I always hope that no Jay gets mad if I run out of peanuts and might swoop down on me, but as you say that attack may only have happened due to young in the nest. Nonetheless, I always keep some peanuts handy for the end of my walk.

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      • Jays or Crows would never attack you or anyone If they were not nesting. They are not that aggressive other wise.
        That man was an unfortunate victim. If I were the city I’d put up barricades to stop anyone else from accidentally disturbing the birds. Besides it’s only for a few weeks. They are simply defending their baby from threats!……just like what human mum’s do!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        This was just a neighbor’s tree and he unfortunately passed underneath it. We always wondered if this Jay had never seen a bald-headed male before and thus its reaction.

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      • No,It wasn’t personal. If anybody had walked under that tree the same reaction would of occurred.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That makes sense.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hawks never bite of more than they can chew….besides your way too big!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Rebecca says:

    I feel your sorrow for the trees, as I have watched many of the large, old oak trees on our country road be cut down or limbs hacked off. It seems so senseless. You sure got some beautiful autumn leaf photos! Such beautiful colors this year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, they were beautiful and the Juniper on a humid morning had a nice smell, the Redbud so picturesque. We had our energy provider cutting trees in all the neighborhoods to prevent issues with power lines a while back. The tree cutters hacked all the trees on a cross street for several miles – they looked like slingshots! People were very upset as those trees never have grown back limbs – they might as well have cut them all the way down to the ground. The colors were beautiful and our meteorologists said it was due to the hot Summer and the two or three chilly spells we’ve had since late August. I got some more pictures at Council Point Park yesterday, almost as vibrant as these.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Joni says:

    Beautiful pictures Linda….there is always something going on in your park, so I hope they don’t change it into a dog park! They’ve tried dog parks here and there are always problems and complaints with them. I see you have the same leaves that I thought were sumac but aren’t. I think you should have a name for that cute gray squirrel – he’s very photogenic. But those nasty hawks and that poor little guy trembling on the fence from the dog…..the poor critters. Sometimes nature isn’t fair, but the owner could control his dog and keep it on a leash!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      PS. Your leaf pictures are gorgeous too….I tried today but I think ours must have peaked already as I didn’t get good shots.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        The pictures I took Saturday morning were not as vibrant, but just past peak So what I got this time was a few shots of leaves all over the ground and looking a little desolate. The new wildlife refuge I went to yesterday, they didn’t really have much range of color – I hope it looks okay when I see the photos – will look later in the week. Across the Detroit River was a small island, just trees, and they were starting to turn a little bit. Plus it was a really gray day. Soon it will be snow settled down on the branches.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Joni – it was a beautiful day for those colorful leaves and quite windy. I took about 20 pictures as the leaves were moving so much. I was not happy reading about a dog park, nor a miniature golf course. Not even if they put it on the other loop … the other loop is where they have an inline rollerblading rink, the playscape but other than that, it just goes along the Creek and there is really nothing to see so I don’t walk that side very much. I would hope if they have to put either one there, they don’t do it on the “critter side” … might as well forget about walking there then. The dog is one thing, but one time around the loop and he’s gone, but they stay up in the tree afterward. The hawks are very worrisome … two days in a row they were there and going after the little black squirrels – they are much smaller than the Fox squirrels. I try to herd them in one place and feed them and take pictures, but they often scurry off to bury their peanuts, so that does not always work. You’re right – that gray squirrel is sweet … there are about six of them now … he reminds me of a puppy or kitten, all fluffy and furry. I like that white front and fluffy tail … I’d be tempted to call him Fluff or Puff … what do you think?

      Liked by 1 person

  14. ruthsoaper says:

    The fall colors here were some of the prettiest we have seen in recent years. They are fading quickly as we now have more leaves on the ground than on the trees. I have some raking to do.

    The house next door to ours has three red bud trees. They are beautiful when in bloom but their seeds spread everywhere and we have young red bud trees sprouting in places that they shouldn’t be. Once they root they are a pain to get rid of. I have come to think of them as an invasive species.

    It does seem odd that they city would consider a park that supposedly doesn’t allow dogs to become a dog park when there are so many options available. Maybe they just haven’t thought it through and your comments will help.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought the colors were more beautiful this year too Ruth. I was shopping at Meijer about three weeks ago and they have maples that go around the entire perimeter of the parking lot – it was like taking a trip out in the woods up north … all were shades of gold and red at the same time. Just beautiful. I was at the Park Friday morning before the storm, then over the weekend and a lot of leaves came down there too during Friday’s storm. The only leaves still there that are really colorful now are the remaining bushes along the Creek.

      I didn’t know that about redbud trees – wow I learned something. I don’t have any ornamental trees at my house. My neighbor’s maple tree is huge … it was a maple seedling that sprouted in a part of the grass that was more soil than grass. The homeowners were young, their first house and I was outside when they discovered it … “oh, let’s see if it turns into a tree!” I told my mom that night what I heard and we had a good laugh. They spaded around it, put in more dirt, and a little fence around this seedling. They moved to a bigger house a few years later, but that seedling is now a huge tree – I am amazed. It has tar spot but is otherwise healthy and causes at least 10 bags of leaf cleanup as more of it is on my property than its own!

      I don’t know why they would want to make a dog park in this beautiful natural setting – if they do the other side of the park would be bad enough. They have ordinances about dog walking but they have never been obeyed.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Wow, so many changes! Some good and some bad… but I guess that’s the way of the world. Your pictures of the changing leaves – and orange berries – are beautiful! I’m not a big fan of dog parks either. They take up a lot of space and can be quite messy and noisy. But, then I don’t own a dog so who cares what I think.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, too many changes for me, but I guess they don’t cater to me. Glad you liked the shots Janis – I find those different berries around the Park are as colorful as the leaves. I think it is a mistake to have a dog park there too. People walked their dogs on public sidewalks for eons and that worked, but I’m like you – I don’t have a dog, so people won’t listen to my protests.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. susieshy45 says:

    Hi Linda,
    Thank you for sharing those wonderful Fall pictures- I enjoyed seeing them through your eyes- last year I saw them with my own. I never knew an autumn in Kerala till I went to the US last year and wondered whether it was Falling here too. We have cooler weathers, and more birdsong. Who knows if even the tropics have the Fall.
    I am saddened by those trees being cut. We don’t realise these are living creatures that feel the pain and the sorrow of being cut off in their prime and we of all should know what that means having lost so many young people to the pandemic. I am sure many of them thought- what did we do to deserve this?
    But there is one thing about trees and plants- they do grow back. One way or the other. So that gives us hope.
    Susie

    Like

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