Breakin’ bad, er … bread. #Wordless Wednesday #Seagull shenanigans

Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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61 Responses to Breakin’ bad, er … bread. #Wordless Wednesday #Seagull shenanigans

  1. Seagulls are the beggars of the birds.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Now I see your gull with the injured foot ~ poor guy. It looks so painful. But he seems to be a survivor, which I find inspiring, and you got a great picture of him!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, see I did these posts back-to-back on Sunday and at the last minute decided to split the post in two … did he remind you of The Captain Barbara? The other picture was fairly clear too, but I didn’t include it since he wasn’t eating or part of the feeding frenzy there. I’m sure it is a fish hook in there. I have a few more posts coming up with seagulls in them. Going to try and stagger them so I don’t inundate everyone with seagulls, like I often do with the squirrels. I did make it down there today thankfully. I walked in the street and on the grass at the Park, but it was only about 18 degrees at the time. We didn’t get the predicted wintry mix last night … next snow is Sunday so I can catch up on my miles.

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      • He does remind me of The Captain, but a much younger version and he looks like a smaller ring-billed gull while The Captain is a larger herring gull. What is the same, though, is that they both seem to make the best of their situations and carry on in spite of their challenges and pain. That’s a lesson for living I take from their example. But I do wonder if your gull could be captured and have that hook removed and then be returned to the wild? How long has it been there, that you know of? I worry about the wound getting infected, it being a foreign object. Are there any bird rescue groups in your area? Have fun catching up on your miles before the next storm!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think this gull was younger based on his spots on his head – was that what you were going by too Barbara? I will tell you that once I was at this same park, maybe five years ago, and saw a seagull perched on the fence, holding one leg up. I saw a piece of fishing line dangling from his foot. I took a photo of it and contacted the DNR when I got home and said I had a photo if they needed to see it. I said I was at Bishop Park a full hour and it never moved and maybe an avian specialist or even a regular vet could catch it and pull it out? Their answer was “it’s just a fishhook and will eventually fall out.” I figured there were vets in the area that volunteer their time – I guess not. I go to Bishop Park about ten times a year and can’t say I saw that gull with the fish hook again, but it was not only bad infection wise, but the line could trap it somewhere while trying to get food.

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      • Yes, the spots on his head and he just didn’t look as weather-beaten as some of the older one I see. I wish fishers would clean up their tackle after themselves instead of discarding it where it threatens the wildlife. So selfish and thoughtless of them. Probably the same inconsiderate people who are litter bugs along the highways. That’s so sad the DNR wouldn’t respond to your plea for help. I guess we’re spoiled here with quite a few local animal and bird rescues. It’s so heart-breaking what animals suffer because of us.

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  3. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Dear Ms “Shenanigans”………………………….I’m glad there are a lot of other people who enjoy feeding the sea gulls……………..and taking their pictures……………………and sharing their handicaps

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      The man had a huge bag of bread Ann Marie. And he had two young kids with him and a woman … the woman was standing with the kids a few minutes but didn’t care for the birds swooping and diving, so she sat in the car, but the kids were having fun watching the man (whom I think was their father) feeding them.

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  4. Rebecca says:

    Looks like you’ve charmed the seagulls as well as the squirrels. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – in my post before, I had this one seagull, posing nicely and I took a lot of photos and he flew away. I walked to another riverfront park and returned to my car. Seagulls everywhere and I was sorry they were all blurry and I couldn’t use the photos. But I like the way they all settled down eventually in a neat queue. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rebecca says:

        I enjoy watching seagulls. They are humorous and interesting birds to watch. Bummer about the photos turning out blurry. That’s always disappointing when it happens.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, they are and have such personalities. I have more seagull shots to share, maybe spacing them out a little more. The seagulls were almost crashing into one another in their eagerness to get the bread. They were a blur of white and gray – I am sure it’d be really easy to recreate that scene though!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. AJ says:

    You get some gorgeous photos

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Where there’s food, there are gulls. I do enjoy watching them but don’t like it when they get too demanding. This looks like a nice area to walk along the water.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes they are bad for swooping and dive-bombing you when you walk along the boardwalk. There are gulls at the other boardwalks at BASF Park and Elizabeth Park but the first one has no picnic area and the second has picnic areas that are on the other side, so no worries there. When the shad are running down at the Creek, there are so many of shad at one particular time, that the seagulls sit on the water like a duck and just poke their heads in the water and scoop them up like that. I just Googled to see what seagulls eat (especially since none of the fishermen, walkers and joggers are down there now and due to our brutally cold weather all week, the River is likely frozen over. I was sorry I saw their diet. Ugh.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, they truly are opportunists when it comes to food. Shad sounds like something that would be healthy for them, but usually I see them clean up fast food remnants that people have dropped on the pavement. I’m sure that that’s just as unhealthy for them as it is for humans.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        As I was reading your comment and the line about the gulls gobbling up fast food, I was thinking the same thing “tasty, but not good for you!” I used to go to a small bakery to buy their homemade bread for years. They had a huge sign on the wall over the case where the donuts were on display. The sign said “didn’t you earn at least one of these donuts today?”

        Liked by 1 person

      • That was quite the sign on the wall!

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  7. Joni says:

    I can hear the shrieking from here!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – I originally planned to combine both posts but it would be pretty long and all seagulls, so I split them up. Oh, the noise when they all arrived. I got back to my car just as he started feeding them.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Laurie says:

    When I taught chemistry, all my students thought I had to watch Breaking Bad. I never did. Isn’t feeding the seagulls fun? My grandkids love to toss some bread up when we go to the beach. Great seagull shots!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I never saw Breaking Bad as I didn’t have cable, but heard so much about it that I finally was curious what it was all about and no wonder your students thought you should watch it. This guy’s bread disappeared too quickly for the seagulls and also his kids who got a kick out of watching them swoop and dive for the bread. Thank you – they all assembled in a neat line on the boardwalk railing and that was odd as they immediately quietened down.

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  9. Prior... says:

    great title and the flow of each photo was excellent (your artsy set up again) with that middle one have the lmao post center and the ending wings out in two as they were all
    lined up

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Yvette – I’m glad you liked how I set up this post. As I watched through the camera lens, I was fascinated with the whole scene. Those gulls were there in a heartbeat, just a blur of birds. The guy had just opened up the bag of bread as I arrived and gulls soon filled the sky. Once the food was done, they exited the parking lot and headed to the water. I loved how they lined up on the boardwalk railing too, still feisty from the encounter and how much bread they managed to get.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. They hang around our local Walmart… and our Walmart is not near any water. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – yes, they hang out at my Meijer grocery store too. They figure “any port in a storm” if a shopper sees them and reaches into their bag of donuts or muffins and shares a few morsels with them.

      Like

  11. More great pictures of the CUTE seagulls….lol That poor seagulls foot is so sad. I hate seeing injured wildlife.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Diane – I thought I might have overdone it with the seagulls but I came back from the second park to find seagulls dive-bombing and screeching and surrounding this guy. I had lots more photos of them, but they were all blurry. I felt badly for the seagull too. It looked like it hurt as he held it up and I wondered if he had a fish hook in it as there was something hanging off his injured foot.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. WOW – you got some great shots. And do tell…how did you dodge all the poop too!?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Shelley – I was standing back of all the action. I took lots of photos that ended up being a big blur because there were gulls going every which way – it was crazy. I am happy to report both the car and I remained unscathed. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Pam Lazos says:

    Lovely to see all that blue, Linda. We are in the middle of a wonderful snowstorm right now so no blue in sight, but I love love love the snow. It’s only our second one of the winter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You’d be surprised just how clear the Detroit River is Pam, especially given all the freighters that go down that waterway during shipping season. I’ve been hearing about that snowstorm and saw some photos on Twitter of different locations – it sure is pretty and still going in some places. We’ve had some minor snow events but are on track to get a Polar blast next weekend and then some heftier snow will be arriving. At least you are working from home, so can enjoy the snow from your home and not be commuting in it!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I imagine there are different variations of seagulls, but your river seagulls (rivergulls?) look very much like our west coast sea gulls. And, they are just as happy to descend on bread scraps.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I had not looked at what type of gulls they were Janis, but a fellow blogger who lives near the shore said they were Ring-billed gulls. I think that’s the only type we have here and you are right – they see food and will descend in a heartbeat to see if you’re willing to share.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I will take a closer look at seagulls next time! Thanks for showing me that seagulls are interesting to observe with their funny antics. I once tried feeding them with the kids, but they were too eager and flew around us. It freaked out the kids and they never wanted to try again. Maybe we’ll try again where it’s not a flock of them coming at us.
    I like the “follow the leader” photo!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, that’s a real problem with seagulls. I was there and only one seagull, then walked to another park along the Detroit River and came back to this. And yes, they were kind of out of control with the swooping and diving, so I could see how the kids were freaked out … switch to ducks. They are less hysterical when they see food. 🙂

      Like

      • Your description of what they do, swooping and diving, is right on. Some can get really close. Millions of years ago, friends and I had a KFC picnic at Santa Monica beach. We left our spot momentarily to run around and when we came back, we were surprised to find nothing but an empty bucket. lol. They are smart. Don’t they also swoop down and eat when you hold food out in your hand?
        This is ridiculous, but it may work: hold an umbrella while feeding seagulls. I know that’s a lame idea. lol. Ducks are mellow here too, but wild geese tend to congregate with them. Geese are taller and aggressive. K, must look for a place where only ducks live. Golden Gate Park in SF has a serene duck pond and walking area. We’ll have to get a bag of oats or seeds and head out there when the weather warms up.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That’s something to look forward to once the weather is warm and Spring-y feeling. I have not fed them in a while. I did it at this Park and it was just oyster crackers and they went crazy and all the fishermen were mad as they swarmed over. I just dumped them in the water. The umbrella may work and keep them from swarming you like in the photos.

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      • Wouldn’t that be hilarious to see?: Six legs under an umbrella tossing oats for frantic 2 legged feathered friends.
        The birds get out of control and too close for comfort.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It would be a funny shot – I agree Esther. Yes they do get too close and you remember what I told you about the Mute Swan who climbed up out of the water and took off after me. It was scary as we had ice and snow and I had to walk backwards as I wanted to watch it closely as I was afraid it would lunge at me and flap its wings.

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      • Slipping is serious, especially with ice and snow beneath you. Good thing the swan just gave you a scare and no attacked.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes it is and he took after me in a heartbeat. I was just admiring him and the Missus as they swam in the Creek. It was a bright, sunny Winter day with snow on the banks. He didn’t like me taking pictures and they were far away when I took the shots.

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  16. I’m not sure why but If a Gull has an injury it’s usually to it’s feet. I’ve seen many with no foot at all.

    Like

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’m not why either Wayne, but this Gull had something hanging from his foot, like an acquatic plant or something that got caught on his foot. I thought he maybe had a fish hook in his foot which is what I have seen in the past. Once in the past, the hook and a piece of fishing line was hanging from it … poor thing.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’d say the vast majority of injures comes from humans! Directly or indirectly!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I agree with you Wayne – look at all the trash people throw into the water and it gets tangled up in waterfowl’s feet and I saw a story a few weeks ago about all the incidents of people who throw away disposable masks and several ducks got their feet inside the ear loops and cut off their circulation. Crazy – put trash where it belongs.

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      • Your right Linda! Even If everyone puts all the trash into the garbage many problems can still arise.
        That garbage gets taken out to the local dump and dumped. Birds are always close by to pick over the new droppings! Many of these birds get their heads or feet caught up in some sort of accidental trap and their ain’t anybody that’s going to come help them!

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, people are so careless … I see lots of things on Twitter where turtles have gotten their heads inside a pop six-pack “connector” and can’t get loose or a critter’s head is jammed inside an empty yogurt container.

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      • I saw a bear with it’s head inside a paint can! The colour was white. I’d spot “old whitey” wandering along the shore for months after that!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I “like” for the image of the white head afterward, but “dislike” that the poor bear could have died from having its head inside the can!

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      • I agree! The silly bear broke into someones remote cabin,smelled the paint and promptly pulled a Poo mistake!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        He must’ve read the book! Seriously … surely there was no food smells in the paint can to lure him there?

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      • No,your not thinking like a bear. A bear wakes up and goes about it’s business each day. They know certain smells,water,earth,trees etc. When they come across something they have never smelled before they get curious…….”can I eat it”? Paint does contain chemicals. Some of these smells do attract them.
        They usually destroy something taste testing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am thinking that the paint smells terrible though – I thought animals had a better sense of smell than humans – maybe boredom too? One of our female polar bears at the Detroit Zoo was killed by a male the other day. That’s not happened since the late 80s. They were in an enclosure for mating purposes and the male killed her. The Zoo was surprised as this male has fathered a lot of cubs, never been aggressive before and a week or so ago, they just revealed two polar bear cubs fathered by this male born in November.

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      • Yes,their sense of smell is far better than ours. When they smell something they have never smelled before they get curious? They want to know If they can eat it or not.
        That male Polar bear has snapped with being caged. A caged human will go nuts after awhile! All animals personalities are altered by imprisonment!
        We shouldn’t have Zoo’s! Too many animals have gone nuts and injured others or themselves. We all have heard about Circus Elephants going berserk!
        It’s cruel and unusual punishment inflicted by us on innocent souls!

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank goodness for the circus elephants getting a reprieve from cramped conditions just to have someone ride around the ring on them with the circuses banning elephant acts. The article said the zookeepers were horrified as it had never been aggressive before. Yes, they probably get tired of being caged up, humans gawking at them all the time. The polar bear exhibit at this zoo is a natural setting and they had lived together for a year. They are from different zoos brought together for breeding purposes. The bear who died was on loan here from Buffalo.
        Here is the story if you want to read it.
        https://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/oakland-county/2021/02/09/detroit-zoo-polar-bears-killed-breeding-anana-nuka/4460895001/

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