Nutty Buddy.

I want to share a story, which blog post I was tempted to entitle “Animals Never Forget” (at least when it comes to food anyway). That statement makes me think of elephants which reportedly never forget … that’s not just for peanuts, but there are many heart-warming tales I’ve read about baby elephants rescued by humans in the wild, then they forevermore trail after those people, lumbering along, occasionally grabbing onto them with their trunk, like a friendly handshake or a loving gesture.

Now, I don’t interact with elephants, but I do so with squirrels and birds on a regular basis, as anyone who has followed this blog for a while knows. These stories were not at Council Point Park, but at my house.

Welcome back!?!?

It was a mid-afternoon in May when I opened the front door to check the mail. Our eyes met and though it was approximately 25 feet away, there was a flicker of recognition on both our parts. I continued watching this stranger for a minute or so, who then went back to nibbling on a slice of pizza.

Suddenly, there was a move reminiscent of the videos that went viral of “Pizza Rat” (the rodent that dragged a slice of pizza down a set of stairs in a New York subway and then in this video along a street grate. (Click here if you missed it.)

I watched this wiry little black squirrel dragging a humungus slice of pizza across the street and then handily depositing it on my City property. It then stood on haunches and eyed me again. I finally opened the screen door to check the mail and that squirrel made a beeline for the front porch.

You may recall I fed peanuts to a passel of critters every morning on my front porch for several years. I had quite the following, many pair of critters, not unlike Noah collected for his Ark. There were two Blue Jays, two Cardinals, two Eastern Gray squirrels, two Black squirrels, one Fox squirrel and one poor squirrel that had no fur, not even on its bushy tail, the worst case of mange I’ve ever seen. I gave that poor soul the moniker of “Willard” as it looked like a rat. I wrote about and photographed my collection of critters, especially Grady, one of the gray squirrels, who was especially cute and incessantly begged for peanuts. Then, in the span of a few weeks’ time in Spring 2020, all of these squirrels were gone. I asked my neighbor, whose workplace was closed due to COVID and he was logging lots of TV time at the front window, if he’d seen “my squirrels” and he told me a Coopers Hawk was often across the street in a big tree and no doubt my squirrels had become his prey. I felt sick to my stomach about their horrible demise and stopped feeding everyone immediately.

Because Willard was completely furless, I never knew what species of squirrel it was, but it was exceptionally tiny, especially with no fur on its body or even his tail. I’m convinced this black squirrel is Willard, who escaped the talons of that Coopers Hawk and just like the story about the “Ugly Duckling” Willard has emerged into a beautiful little squirrel. I’ve been feeding it daily and had to stop checking the mail in the afternoon as it scoped me out, licking its lips while scrambling down the tree thinking “yay, Linda put out more peanuts for me!” I wouldn’t get time to open the mailbox lid before this little nipper was at the porch in begging stance.

I’ve named this cutie pie “Two-Tone” for obvious reasons.

Sure, Two-Tone is sleek with shiny black fur …

… but that bushy golden tail looks like a bottle blonde two months into the pandemic, sporting ugly black roots. 🙂

I think it’s a female, but I’m not sure. This recent picture I got in a tree seems to indicate it’s a nursing mom. Two-Tone never stops long enough for me to really check him/her out. In the driveway it gives me wide berth and makes a beeline to the bushes, then to the porch for peanuts. I continually witness this cautious behavior of going to the porch via the cover of bushes which gives credence to the theory it IS Willard, i.e. perhaps Two-Tone saw the fate of its friends rushing out in the open to get their share of peanuts.

I’ve only got two photos outside; the rest are from the front door. It’s scared of me, but braver when the screen door separates us. I have to laugh as Two-Tone is hanging out near the front door every morning when I open it … it wants to get a jump on the Cardinals and Jays who once again have returned for their fair share of peanuts.

Meanwhile, last Monday morning I was checking for storm damage after severe weather Sunday night. I walked into the backyard and saw a hairy gray critter with a white face. I immediately recognized an opossum but we both looked at each other like “who are you and what are you doing here?” I was taken aback, instantly regretting I didn’t have my camera handy, as I’d only dashed out to check the A/C grille for tree debris from the storm so I could turn the A/C on. Of course I was tempted to assign him/her a name … “Oscar the Opossum” or “Petunia the ‘Possum” – no, I decided on neither, as I really don’t want to encourage it to hang around, even if an opossum eats 5,000 ticks a season and we have a tick infestation due to the wonky weather.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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86 Responses to Nutty Buddy.

  1. Prior... says:

    Hi Linda – enjoyed going down memory lane a bit with you and the two-tone is a cutie
    Also- did not know the opossum ate ticks – very cool

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Linda Schaub says:

    Glad to give you a smile Yvette. I understand possums are not dangerous but it sure was a shock to see it and I do like the tick-eating attributes.

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  3. Sandra J says:

    What a fascinating story Linda, how cool that he is back and what an unusual color. Amazing how nature and animals work and survive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked it Sandra. I’m positive that’s the same squirrel. It never made a move to come over to the porch before, nor approach me, as I never offered anything. Just that one day, the “stare” was like “please notice me Linda … remember me?” I think that’s why the pizza slice was dragged across the street to my lawn … to get my attention. I always say that animals are so much smarter than most people give them credit for. The color sure is unusual and I’ve never seen it before. I felt so sorry for Willard that last Winter – no fur and Willard was scared of everything. I’ve seen squirrels at the Park with mange and their fur eventually grows back again.

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  4. J P says:

    I have often wondered how long a squirrel in the wild can live if it manages to stay a step ahead of predators. How cool if it is the same squirrel you remember.

    I was thinking of squirrels yesterday when I had to clean out the blower area in one of my cars after it started making noise. I got a bunch of debris and 5 walnuts out of it. I have no idea how most of that stuff got there, but my bet is on a squirrel who tried to nest there. How it got in is another thing about which I have no idea.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I once read it was eight years, especially in a park where they live their entire lives, not susceptible to being run over crossing the street or hurt by someone’s dog. I’m able to I.D. a few squirrels at Council Point Park who have identifying characteristics (bent tail, half tail) or personalities and I’ve interacted with them since I began walking there in 2013.

      Yikes! You had that same problem with your car before as I recall … the pesky black walnut tree. I saw a few black walnuts with the green rinds on them today while walking, so there will be more incidents in the cards for you I suspect … to add insult to injury, it is your own tree! I have a mud dauber’s nest in my garage, affixed to the garage door. In the Wintertime, I saw my neighbor outside and asked him if it was dormant as I’d never seen wasps – he grabbed a broom and rapped it hard with the handle and said “they’re gone – don’t sweat it.” Today, lots of holes are in the nest and several wasps buzzing about – now I have to deal with them.

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  5. I remember Grady!!!!!!!!!!! Wow, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a two-toned squirrel. That’s very interesting. I’m glad you didn’t encourage the new visitor – tick eater or not, they aren’t the best critters to have close to the house.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought you might remember him Shelley. I wrote several posts about Grady. He was the apple of my eye and the cutest of this bunch and he knew it and I spoiled him silly. (The snowman adorned with treats was one example.) 🙂 Two-Tone is unusual looking. I’ve never seen a squirrel with this coloring. I could not believe my eyes seeing that possum and it was huge so well fed by someone, but whom?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, I do remember him! He did adore you. Two-tone isn’t quite Grady, but he is interesting to look at! Possums are garbage dwellers – thank someone in your neighborhood for an open garbage container. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Grady had such a personality and the incessant begging was his trademark, but who could resist him? Like Parker, I spoiled him silly. I will cater to Two-Tone too … put out a block of ice the past few days hoping to provide some water to cool off. I’m not any happier to know a possum is digging around in garbage, then trotting through the yard, than when the neighbor’s dog caused rats and having to discontinue feeding and giving water to the birds. Then my neighbor said he saw a raccoon in our yard – over the top. This is not a rural area of town!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Wow – the word is out you’re kind to the furry creatures roaming the neighborhood! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        🙂 I’m a soft touch (or maybe a sucker for those little critters) but I’m not having much success with my hummingbird, unless she visits on off hours when I’m not around. I’d like to think my efforts in maintaining two hummingbird feeders are not totally wasted. Somehow the squirrel and songbirds gig is better suited to me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes you are! Hummingbirds do like early mornings and late evenings for feedings, unless they’re protecting the feeder, then they’re there 24/7!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am going to post a note for them that I am not going to keep fiddling around with feeding them if they don’t show me a sign of life soon! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. There has been a big campaign locally for people not to harm possums as they do so much good. I used to get them in my yard but it usually was dusk to dawn. Weird looking but they want to live like everyone else.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Kate – I’ve seen a campaign like that on Facebook recently where it states if you see a possum in the daytime, it is looking for food for its babies, as they’re usually nocturnal, so not to be alarmed by it. I was taken aback by seeing it because it was huge so it made me wonder where it was dining to get that big – maybe it was pregnant though, not sure. We surprised one another and I wished I had the camera.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ally Bean says:

    I’ve never seen a squirrel like Two-Tone. He is unique. While I get that possums look odd, they do good in their own odd ways, preferably far away from the house.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Two-Tone is unique – I’ll say that Ally. I’ve never seen that color combo before. I know the possums are out in the day looking for food, sometimes for their young as they’re nocturnal. I’ve seen the PSAs on social media, but I don’t like knowing it’s running around the yard. A few years ago my neighbor said he had seen a raccoon in our backyards and I felt the same way about that sighting. I am not out in the sticks!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Two-Tone is beautiful! “A bottle blonde two months into the pandemic, sporting ugly black roots” had me laughing. 🤣 But I kind of like the look, the contrast is appealing. Who knew there is such diversity to be found in the world of squirrels? He/she will certainly stand out in the crowd if you get more squirrels returning, especially in the fall. Nice pictures, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – glad you liked the pictures and my reference to Two-Tone’s um … unusual blonde tail. It sure reminded me of that roots syndrome. I’m sure I’ll be able to pick Two-Tone out in a crowd going forward. 🙂

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      • It will be interesting to see if Two-Tone fathers or gives birth to a new generation of two-toned squirrels. Genetic variations fascinate me…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’ll be on the lookout for a passel of blond(e)-tailed squirrels for sure. I know that the baby squirrels stay in the nest and are dependent on their moms (nursing only) for about three months. In all my years of walking at Council Point Park, I can’t say that I can tell when the young squirrels appear, so I think once they leave the nest, their parents are teaching them to forage when there are no humans around.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Two-tone is cute. I’m glad you are feeding at home now and hope nothing will discourage you from it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought so too Anne. A very unusual color combo for this squirrel. I hated to stop as I enjoyed seeing the Blue Jays and Cardinals coming by. I am reluctant to put up a platform feeder as I have nowhere to hang it except from a shepherd’s hook and the squirrels can do calisthenics and will eat up everything. I’ll keep doing this. We had a real feel of 94 degrees this afternoon. I took a Styrofoam cup and put water in it and put it in the freezer to give Two-Tone in the a.m. I saw someone did that on a nature site on Twitter for her squirrels. No one in my neighborhood has a birdbath anymore, including me, so I imagine they’re drinking from puddles during this heat.

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      • No one has a birdbath? I have two, and these days I change the water every other day. They get yucky quickly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        No, that is terrible isn’t it? I had four birdbaths when I had the garden … two regular sized gardens, one medium and one small. The smallest one was used mostly by the squirrels, the medium for the tiny birds. I had to stop giving water and food to the birds back in 2008 when a new neighbor moved in behind Marge/our house and they had a pit bull and left it out 24/7/365. They never cleaned up after it and we soon had rats. The pest control service said “no birdbaths … the rats will eat the bait then become very thirsty from the bait effects, so will go to the birdbaths to drink. I cleaned them up and put them away. The neighbor got rid of the dog, we ceased the pest control for rats and I put them out again. They got a new dog, the rats returned, so that was the end of watering the birds. (I had the HVAC guy at the house for a routine A/C check and he asked me for a bag to put the dead rat’s body into my yard waste bag. It breaks my heart to see our weather so hot with no water for the birds. At least all the rain would help them out, maybe in gutters, puddles on the ground.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        I know – I wish I knew if I could resume using the bird baths, but with the appearance of the possum and the sighting of a raccoon by my neighbor, I’d best leave well enough alone.

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      • Something knocked water out of one birdbath yesterday. ???

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        They must have really been dirty! I had those four birdbaths and the medium-sized one was a favorite for doves. I’d never seen a dove take a bath before, but there it was splashing away, completely submerged with just its head sticking out. It really was funny to see it.

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      • Doves drink from our baths, but I’ve not seen one take a bath.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        They do not twist and turn and flap their wings like a Robin would. What they do, I guess since they’re bigger, is they sink down into the water and submerge themselves to the neck. They bob around a little, then step out, but most of the water sloshes out by the way they use the birdbath. They stay in that position a long time, like a woman might in a bubblebath.

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      • I’ll bet the doves are letting the mites drown. How I wish I could see that!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Both of our canaries would take a bath in their water cup. We had parakeets for years and they all liked taking a bath in a bathtub that was enclosed on three sides and hung on the cage door. They’d hop in and splash around, then go back into the cage. The canaries didn’t like that style, nor any other styles of bath we tried. It was so bad with my last canary, Buddy, that I had to leave the cup out all the time and put the cup in once an hour, otherwise he’d bathe in it. Not good, especially in Winter or when the A/C was on.

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      • I had two parakeets, and I don’t remember either of them ever taking a bath. The second one died about 53 years ago.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Our last parakeet, Joey, loved his bath – every morning, before the A/C came and other seasons except the dead of Winter. But they make a big mess so with him, he had an enclosed bath, so he could shake his feathers afterward and splash around and not get the cage wet. Bathing in the water cup was not cool, especially during molting, when feather are flying as they are hopping from perch to perch.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Laurie says:

    I did not know that opossums ate ticks. Thanks for the education, Linda. I hope Two-Tone IS Willard. I like to think the poor hairless squirrel grew this beautiful black/blond coat.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I found that tick fact interesting too Laurie. I’d been seeing the information on various nature sites that if you see a possum out in the daytime, they’re scrounging for food for their young and not to worry. Then it mentioned about how each possum downs 5,000 ticks a year. I’m guessing poor Willard is Two-Tone and drawing my attention to his plight (i.e. why make me eat pizza when you have peanuts ready and accessible?) was his way of reconnecting with me.

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  11. A truly .hansom squirrel

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Rebecca says:

    How unusual and unique! I’ve never seen a Two-Tone squirrel. Wonderful photos!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. ruthsoaper says:

    So glad that you have been reunited with one of you little pals. This should also give you hope that perhaps the others did not fall prey to the hawk but perhaps found safer accommodations due to the hawks presence.
    I recently finished a book about an elephant and have just started another. The book I finished was called Modoc and is easily one of the best books I have ever read. Have you heard of it? An incredible story and very well written. The one I am reading now is The Elephant Keeper. Not quite as good of a read but still good. Elephants are amazing animals.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. What a beautiful two-toned squirrel you have visiting! Nice to see that your neighborhood friends are back to snacking on your porch, Linda! I don’t know much about opossums, but googled them. Turns out they not only devour ticks, but also eat small rodents, insects, snails and carrion. They usually keep their distance from humans. I also read that they can transmit a number of unpleasant diseases! I’ve never seen one in my garden, but they do live in the area. Hopefully your opossum stays only long enough to eat all the ticks and then moves on to another yard!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought Two-Tone was quite unique too Sabine. I agree with you – I like the idea that the opposum was catching a lot of ticks, but the diseases are worrisome too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hopefully Two-Tone will stay close by! I haven’t seen any squirrels here lately, but they always disappear during the heat. I wonder where they retreat to?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I hope so too Sabine – I’ll encourage it and Two-Tone is the only squirrel in this neighborhood, a whole City block … one squirrel is odd but that gives credence to my theory it is the same squirrel who miraculously lived. I’ll bet they stay in their trees in this oppressive heat and hopefully they forage in the cool early morning and “take it to go!”

        Liked by 1 person

      • The heat makes life harder for all of us, including the critters! I try to make sure there’s fresh water for everyone in the garden. I think that’s more important than food right now, judging from all the visitors at the birdbath.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, the critters can forage for food. I saw some squirrels at the Park hauling around the black walnuts with the green rinds on them. I was sure they didn’t ripen until later in the Summer but I guess everything is on an accelerated pace this year due to the heat. The hummers will be relying on your sugar water until your garden perks up again after the heat wave.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Fortunately critters are resourceful, but when the temps go up like they did you have to wonder how they survive! Hopefully we won’t get more superheat this summer!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, that’s when I see them sprawled out on branches or really lethargic looking. The squirrels were full of energy and running all over the pathway yesterday and today. Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed … until Sunday when it’s hot as a firecracker again.

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  15. Eilene Lyon says:

    That is an unusual squirrel. I think you’re right about it being a nursing mother. Interesting opossum fact, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It’s a first time for me seeing a squirrel with this coloration Eileen. I’ll be happy to keep her fat and content to take care of those offspring, so I may see them running around looking like mini Two-Tones. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m glad to see that Two-Tone hasn’t ended up grabbed by that Cooper’s Hawk Linda!
    Never seen a squirrel like that before? Did it bring the pizza for you?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Me too Wayne. The look it gave me was like “don’t you recognize me – you fed me before?” Then it made a mad dash to the porch where I always feed my merry band of furry and feathered critters. The two black squirrels were jet black – remember you said “call them Pitch and Tar” so it could only be Willard. That last Winter I fed them, I also made a little pile of peanuts at the side of the house as Willard seemed to hang out there by itself. It was very scared and ran when I saw it.. I was worried because there was not a hair on its body and it was skinny and small. No, Two-Tone abandoned that pizza as soon as I put out peanuts. 🙂

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      • It must of brought joy to your heart to see a furry friend come a running!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It did Wayne – I knew instantly that it associated me feeding peanuts at an earlier time and I never knew what Willard looked like as there was no fur, not even on the tail. Willard always crouched in a corner while I was there – it was very afraid of me.

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      • Willard reminds me of the ugly duckling story! He now is the bell of the ball with that big fancy tail of his!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I should have mentioned that ugly duckling story … that is exactly right. That’s a fancy blonde tail no one else has around here. 🙂

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      • you can still go make a slight adjustment you know. I do from time to time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’ll do that right now Wayne – good idea. I took this morning off from walking – it is oppressive out there and we are expecting still another storm … not just rain but a storm advisory. Not severe. I just fed Two-Tone at 7:15 … peanuts and a tall Styrofoam cup of ice. I waited at the door for 10 minutes … the open door is equated with “peanut time” … must be sleeping in. But once the trek to the peanuts begins, it continues. I’ve been leaving about 20 to keep Two-Tone full and the Cardinals and Jays happy. They scam one or two from the pile.

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      • I was surprised to see that we actually got rain during the night! We needed that!
        I much rather would have cooler than normal temperatures than hotter than normal!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Same here Wayne. I am not enjoying this hot and humid Summer at all and Spring was too hot for my liking as well. I’m trying to bulk up my miles since I did not reach my self-imposed goal of 700 miles by the time half the year was over, because who knows – we might have snow arrive in October or very early in November like it has the last few years? I like(d) having four distinct seasons and that nicety seems to have taken a hike.

        Liked by 1 person

      • making hay while the sun shines might be a good idea Linda as it could be a hard Fall?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That’s what I’m thinking and hearing Wayne. I’m ready to jump ahead to Fall right now and bypass this ever-present heat and humidity.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Dave says:

    I have not heard the name “Willard” outside of the movie; neither before nor after. That was one of a handful of films I wish I had never seen (“Deliverance” being another). Some scenes you just can’t forget. So I’m glad to read you’ve renamed your little friend Two-Tone. Makes for a more – ahem – enjoyable story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I never saw the movie “Willard” but I mentioned this fur-less squirrel in a post about the group of squirrels that came to the front porch ever morning, along with the four birds that sat in the tree waiting for peanuts. A fellow blogger said it probably looked like a rat and why not name it Willard so I did. It cowered when it saw me and hung back a little from getting peanuts so I used to leave a pile at the side of the house just for Willard.
      It was so tiny I didn’t expect it to survive the Winter. I remember seeing “Deliverance” and “The Exorcist” – two movies I could have done without as well. Glad you liked my Two-Tone story Dave and I had already written it and scheduled it to post then read your colorful post last night and I had to smile.

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  18. AnnMarie stevens says:

    Linda……………………………………thank you for the story on “Two-toned”………………………….and on “Willard”………………………………………..I enjoyed them…………………………………………You’re such a good story teller writer!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ann Marie – you always make my head swell. 🙂 I’ve been making “squirrel popsicles” for Two-Tone due to this heat. I saw a cute video on a nature site I follow of a squirrel licking a block of ice that someone put out for “their squirrel” who visits them daily. So far, I’m not sure Two-Tone knows what to do with it, but I’ll keep trying to encourage its use. This morning, I put a peanut on top of the ice to help speed up the learning curve.

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  19. clarejk2014 says:

    That’s such an unusual looking squirrel. We often have greys here and, in some places, the rarer red squirrels but I’ve never seen a black squirrel with a golden tail before.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. How unique Two-Tone is! I don’t see black squirrels at my house let alone two colors. I have a camera at my pond and I see all kinds of critters at night too. Opossums are the creepiest looking critter aren’t they?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought so too Diane. I’ve never seen a squirrel like this and I’ve been spoiling her this Summer. That was my first look at an opossum, though I’ve seen them in pictures. Yes, that long face made it very creepy looking.

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  21. Joni says:

    Linda, it does seem strange that they’ve all of a sudden reappeared, including the birds, after a whole year? Where do you think they went? I have one of those two-tone ones in my back yard too, with a different color tail, but sad to say, I don’t feed them so they mostly hang out at the neighbours.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      PS. I hope that opossum had not been back!?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I forgot to say that I thought Two-Tone was unique with his coloring and here you saw one with the two-tone com?! I’ve not seen that opossum again – what a shock that was to watch it meandering across the backyard!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I must admit I never pay much attention to the squirrels mostly because they don’t frequent my backyard much, but I do see them running along the top of the back fence, and have noticed the one with a lighter bushy tail,mostly because it’s so distinctive. I’ll have to see if I can get a picture of it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well I think the birds were probably there all along Joni, but I just stopped putting out peanuts so they went looking for food elsewhere. As soon as I started putting out peanuts again, they came back to swipe them once again. I felt badly for stopping, especially for the Cardinals, as there has been a nesting pair in my barberry bushes for decades. They used to wait in a nearby tree for me to open the front door then fly over.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Joni says:

    PS. Did you get flooding like this blogger https://two-rock-chronicles.com/

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    • Linda Schaub says:

      Joni – I was lucky and no flooding in this immediate area but aren’t those pictures just amazing? As of tonight, there are still people in the city of Dearborn who do not have power. Over 4,000 vehicles were left bobbing around in the water from Friday night into Saturday. My weather radio alarm was going off like crazy!

      Liked by 1 person

  23. bekitschig says:

    There’s nothing like a possum walking on your roof at two in the morning 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes and can you imagine looking out your window in the middle of the night as you heard something walking around and see this prehistoric-looking critter looking in at you? I looked at it with the same look it gave me – who the heck are you?

      Like

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