Seize the (Week)Day #5. #Wordless Wednesday #Ms. Bunny Primps for Saturday Night Date Night

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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42 Responses to Seize the (Week)Day #5. #Wordless Wednesday #Ms. Bunny Primps for Saturday Night Date Night

  1. LOVE these bunny pics! 💙 Great pictures, Linda!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joni says:

    Such clear closeups Linda! I wonder where she’s going?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Laurie says:

    Ms. Bunny allowed you to take some adorable photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, she posed very nicely Laurie and when through with her preening and cleaning routine, she looked away, then bounded off. It gave me the idea to say she was primping for Saturday night date night. 🙂

      Like

  4. your bunny seems to be late for a very important date!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes Wayne – she was quietly preening and licking her paws and fur about 10-12 minutes, then took a notion to just look in the distance and bounce away. Love that little powderpuff tail which gives her the name “Cottontail” rabbit.

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      • I thought for a minute that it might be a Hare?

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Nope, a Cottontail Rabbit which is what we have around SE Michigan. The other day Sandra did a post on a Snowshoe Hare which are only found in the northern part of Michigan. They are unique in that they have Summer fur (brown and look similar to the Cottontail) and in Winter they turn white to blend in with the snow. Too bad my furry friends don’t change to white fur so they are not bullseye targets for the hawks.

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      • A big difference between Hares and rabbits…….Hares are carnivores!
        I wouldn’t discount a Hawks vision. They’d see anything that would move!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Ewwww. Hares are not my type of cuddly rabbit. I had a pet white rabbit named “Scratch” when I was a kid. Our Cottontail bunnies like this one are very sweet, bolting if you get too close while they nibble clover or dandelions … or your backyard flowers and veggies from the garden. I tried several times to grow Bleeding Heart plants and each time the bunny(ies) ate them, taking them to mere stubs in the ground.

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      • Ya, Arctic Hares eat mice as there isn’t much grass.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Hmm – When I think of rabbits, I think of cuddly bunnies – not mice-eating hares. I wouldn’t think there would be many mice to eat either in the Arctic, even in Spring/Summer.

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        This was interesting Wayne – thank you for sending it. Now, I have heard of lemmings in the past as to groups, etc. but what was interesting in this story was how the people thought they came from the air from the melting snow. I guess they would not look like mice since they have no tails … looks like they are pretty big at 5-6 inches. Kind of fat too. I never thought of a Snowy Owl – they mention how the Snowy Owl would be eating these creatures. I never thought about how they would be catching their food before, given the tundra existence.

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      • The Arctic is a totally different world unto itself!
        In general the closer you get towards either pole,the larger the animals become.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I should read more about the North and South Pole. I had heard the word lemming and about the lemming leap long ago, but had no idea what they looked like or where they lived and who they were prey for. I appreciated the link you sent me. I followed a woman blogger in Alaska for a while. I don’t get posts anymore – perhaps she doesn’t blog, but I felt kind of ignorant as I really knew nothing of their year-round weather and learned quite a few things.

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      • generally we know more about our surroundings than far away places Linda. Nothing wrong with reading up about places far away and even better If you visit them latter! Reading is one thing, experiencing is another!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is for sure Wayne. I had some more places left that I wanted to see in the world, but the state of the world has me thinking that will not happen. If it isn’t weather woes and climate change, there are other dangers plus you wonder “will this pandemic ever truly end?”. It is not like when I traveled in the late 70s/early 80s.

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  5. Margy says:

    Personal hygiene, bunny style.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I never knew until a few years ago just how fastidious bunnies are about their fur and paws – I mentioned it to someone who had had a rabbit family pet and told me about it. She decided when she looked perfect and then bounded off, flashing that cottontail for which she is named.

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  6. Rebecca says:

    She’s a cutie! I love seeing rabbits.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked her Rebecca. I love seeing them too. I’ve not seen many Cottontails at the park where I walk every day and I think it is because they are not mowing weekly anymore so the clover was/is not as easy to find as when the grass is short. I’ve seen more rabbits nibbling in the neighborhood this year than ever before.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rebecca says:

        Recently we saw two rabbits munching together at the edge of a soybean field and occasionally when we drive into our driveway at night we will see one running for cover. But all in all, we really haven’t seen too many this year.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I wonder if the rabbits this year are having trouble foraging for food due to the extreme heat and/or torrential rain and flooding? Some rain is good for gardens, but an overabundance is not so if they’re feasting in homeowner’s yards they may be out of luck. We have hawks at our Park and I hope what bunnies we do have are not becoming prey to these hawks. I am just sick about my squirrels and those hawks. One of my porch squirrels, (one of Two-Tone’s youngsters we were commenting on) was killed by a car last week, just moments after she was happily munching peanuts on the porch. I felt sick and sad and stopped feeding them after that as their tree/nest is across the street and the same one almost died two days before. I opened the door, put out peanuts on the porch and he/she raced across the street. The other sibling lagged behind all the time. It narrowly missed being hit last Saturday, then died two days later.

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      • Rebecca says:

        I’m sorry to hear about the little squirrel. I know it’s hard to lose one so suddenly and unexpectedly. It certainly has been a hot summer. I can’t blame the bunnies for finding a shady spot and hunkering down during the daytime.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you Rebecca – I felt so badly and still do every time I walk outside, plus dealing with the hawks going after the squirrels at the Park everyday – it is tough. I am thankful for our cooler temps this week … a brief respite from the heat and humidity and I hope we can now just go right into a cooler mode. Yes, the bunnies with all that fur … I don’t see them “splooting” like the squirrels do. 🙂

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  7. bekitschig says:

    Awwww, that’s too much 🙂 Thank you Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Prior... says:

    That was fun to imagine the prepping for date night – hahaha

    Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………………………….nice close up pictures…………………………………….you are a very good photographer……………………..little did that innocent rabbit know he’s the topic of silent conversation!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Ann Marie and thank you. I don’t get many opportunities to take photos of rabbits. That rabbit had a lot of patience and never moved until it was done preening and primping, then scurried off. Too bad it does not know how many other looked at it besides me!

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  10. I haven’t seen a rabbit like that in the wild. It looks like a hare to me but your comments say Cottontail Rabbit, but as you know I’m not too familiar with names and/or specific differences with animals. Animals know to show their best looks for you. 🐰🐇

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a fairly big rabbit Esther. Here in SE Michigan we have Cottontails … they hop away and all you see is that white powder puff tail. A fellow blogger did a post on a snowshoe hare the other day – that hare was big. They are brown in the Summer months, then the fur turns white in the Winter to give them some camouflage in the snow. In this post, you really can tell the difference in size and the big back legs.
      https://intothelightadventures.com/the-snow-shoe-hare/

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