Murder She Wrote.   #Wordless Wednesday  #Counting Crows.  #A murder of crows in the ‘hood.

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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65 Responses to Murder She Wrote.   #Wordless Wednesday  #Counting Crows.  #A murder of crows in the ‘hood.

  1. Anne says:

    For a moment I thought these crows were pulling apart the electric wires! A pair of Cape Crows have become regular visitors to our garden recently.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You’ve got a lot to crow about.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. ruthsoaper says:

    I didn’t know that a group of crows was called a murder. We have seen a lot of crows in our neighbor hood this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ally Bean says:

    Look at you here, crowing about murder! I’m always creeped out by crows, but they do make for a good photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I love Counting Crows, the band. 🙂 I’ve read that crows have long lasting memories and will alert one another when a person or animal who has given them trouble in the past comes around again. I think they hold grudges…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I have heard Counting Crows’ music before – a former coworker loved them and brought a CD to work and would play it at her desk. I know I’ve read and heard that crows are very intelligent. That is amazing crows remember the troublemakers – there was something definitely triggering them to caw and fly about madly like they were. I took a lot of photos of them flying, but they were too blurry to use.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. If there was a “Murder” of Crows then I would look for a dead Crow somewhere or a cat? They react to ground predators and seeing one of their own hurt or dead.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. bekitschig says:

    Oh Linda, well, thank you for … this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pam Lazos says:

    I love that it’s called a murder of crows!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Joni says:

    I didn’t know that’s what they were called, but I always hated them! My mom loves that show and watches the reruns all the time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      They are not as big and scary as ravens who are much bigger. I watched it all the time when it was on the first time and in fact I wrote a post once a while ago about wishing I could be like Jessica Fletcher peddling around such a picturesque town instead of downstairs on my exercise bike.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I’m sure Cabot Cove was a lovely place!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I have always wanted to go to the East Coast, to Cape Cod and be a leaf peeper in the Fall in the New England states. I always thought that the fictional town of Cabot Cove was in Cape Cod, but it actually was filmed in California.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Me too – I’ve often thought of doing a bus tour there. That is disappointing that it was filmed in CA. When I went to the east coast of Canada, we started down the coast of Maine intending to go to Boston but it seemed too long and not very scenic, so we cut across and came back to Canada through Vermont, but it was July so no leave color.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, Vermont is supposed to be a prime place for the foliage too. All the pictures I see of Cape Cod are so scenic, from the houses to the pictures near the water – so maybe some day. Those bus tours I subscribe to have some beautiful different tours. But I really like those railroad tours through the foliage at peak time – at least if it rained or was crummy weather, you could see everything without getting soaked … but with climate change you can’t predict peak time anymore. We were at least a week late for peak color – that was last week. Now the leaves are flying furiously. Will likely have to rake this weekend and next weekend. Not my tree. Sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I spent the afternoon pruning 16 rose bushes, so it’s all neat and tidy and ready for winter, but there are sure a lot of leaves still on the trees. At least it was sunny out and not too cold. I’m sure my back will pay for it tomorrow. I hate raking….

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I resent it as it was one of those Maple seedlings and it is now a huge tree. It’s on the neighbor’s lawn but most of the branches are on my property.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. You are very lucky to have crows in your area, Linda. 👍 Due to West Nile virus, which crows are very susceptible to, there are very few around here.

    Like

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, there were about ten that day but we’ve had a lot in the neighborhood the last four or five years. I know another Corvid, the Blue Jays, are susceptible as well. My mom and I once took a short vacation and returned home to find many Blue Jay bodies in the backyard. We called the DNR, which they had requested on the news, so that any dead birds could be tested for West Nile. They retrieved all the bodies – all had died from West Nile Virus. I don’t know why they all died in the yard. I had a feeder at that time plus gave them peanuts, so they were regular visitors.

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      • Wow, very interesting about the Blue Jays. I only very rarely see any in our area and, of course, the crows are very infrequently seen also. Years ago, when i worked in Dwight, Illinois with the multiply handicapped, there would be innumerable crows in the trees around the parking lot. Peoples’ cars, at the end of the day, would be literally covered in crow-crap! I even suspect that a lot of the crows were aiming for the cars on purpose! Bombs away! 😱

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        We have regained our Blue Jay population but it took a while. West Nile Virus was bad that year. We had three types of mosquito-borne illness this Summer. Luckily the park where I walk daily is not dense and the path is elevated, so it’s not close to the Creek – no mosquitoes, but one walker says she’s gone home with ticks a couple of times. I check for ticks, but have never found any. A fellow blogger said crows may hold a grudge but I’m wondering if they saw their reflection in the car paint?

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  11. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………those crows “catch my breathe just looking at them”………………….near all that high voltage wires!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was incredible Ann Marie – they were making such a noise that I could hear them while I was walking home. I walked over a few blocks in the direction of the noise and there were about ten of them flying and circling the trees and the electrical poles and sitting on the poles – all cawing loudly. I don’t know what was up but they were very animated, that’s for sure.

      Like

  12. Just about every evening just before dusk, we often see a murderous bunch of crows head east towards wherever they spend the night. I’m not a big fan of crows, but it’s a pretty impressive sight.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was amazed how much commotion these crows made Janis. The group I saw were clearly agitated about something and were cawing incessantly in between flying between the utility poles and the trees. I walked over a few blocks just to see what the commotion was about.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Dave says:

    Speaking of groupings, what word is used for squirrels? 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I had to look it up Dave and when I found it, I know I’ve heard the terms “scurry” and “dray” before. I know baby squirrels are called “kits” or “kittens”. I like reading what groups of various birds and animals are called as they are usually funny. I was at the Wildlife Refuge recently and counted 28 Double-Crested Cormorants flying around and perching on several tall trees. It was an impressive sight. When I return from each long walk, I make notes on the highlights so I don’t forget anything as I don’t always look at the photos right away nor write a post. So for kicks I Googled the names for a group of Cormorants – they were funny: a “flight”, “gulp”, “rookery”, “sunning”, and “swim” of Cormorants.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dave says:

        A gulp of Cormorants. Who comes up with this stuff? Could be the subject of its own post, Linda.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That’s a very good idea Dave! Things are slow sometimes in the dead of Winter with snow and ice and I don’t get out as much. All the names they have for groups of animals and birds are off the wall. Also odd that they are not satisfied with one name for one group – they have multiple names!

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Great title and I have seen the show The Birds many times. Maybe it was you they were yelling at? 🤣

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – I never thought of that! The Blue Jays screech as I walk through the Park. They alert their fellow Jays I am putting out peanuts. Maybe the crows were mad I didn’t bring crow treats. (Note to self: must Google Crow treats.) 🙂

      Like

  15. Something about crows and their loud crowing…creepy.
    The movie “Birds” gave me nightmares after I saw it; I regretted ever seeing it. But I saw it again and had the same feelings again. Never see birds the same way again. Yikes!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, crows are very large and very loud. I was walking home and heard all the noise so I knew it was close by so went looking for them. They were agitated about something – that’s for sure. They were circling around, perching in trees and the utility poles. “The Birds” was creepy when there were so many of them. Though way back then, they did a pretty convincing job making us believe they were rea.

      Like

      • Maybe the crows are mad at humans for having the symbolism that they’re bad luck? lol. If they had a smaller crow that could make them less creepy.
        Not seeing that movie again. Twice was enough. If my kids saw it, they’d be angry with me for a long time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I don’t blame you – they were spooky. Crows are really one of the most intelligent birds. A fellow blogger sent me an article long ago about how jays and crows (both from the corvid family) are smart. Crows will put a hard nut onto a roadway as they know a car will crush it, then go retrieve it. The jays follow me around the Park as they know when I arrive I make sure to go to three places besides feeding them along the way – they will follow from tree to tree waiting for me to make a “drop” – sometimes I can coax them down, just by holding a peanut between my fingers.

        Like

      • Very high intelligence indeed! They know how to get what they want. Animals are more intelligent than they get credit. Octopus also use tools to use as a shield for protection. The other day I briefly glanced an article where two bees unscrewed a drink lid together. lol
        You’re brave to feed the animals that close. We’re not used to it so we admire from afar and get way too easily startled.

        Like

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think I have seen that story about the bees and the lid. Do you and the kids every follow The Dodo Esther? I used to follow on Facebook and they have a lot of cute and interesting animal stories which are all in videos. Interesting relations with animals and humans or unlikely animal “friends” – like two orphaned babies, a camel and a calf and how they would pal around with one another and they were out playing together, romping around. I finally unsubscribed as I am behind enough thank you … but “The Dodo” is on FB, Twitter, YouTube Channel and this website:
        https://www.thedodo.com/

        Like

      • I’ve heard of Dodo before and have read some articles from it. I should look more often. We’re huge fans of animal news!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It’s a cute site and I had to unsubscribe from it because there were so many new stories, I got behind in everything else (story of my life). 🙂 I have a Facebook friend who is a pal from high school. She posts a lot of news stories and Dodo stories so I read those instead of all of them.

        Like

  16. Prior... says:

    Great title and pohoti set – ha
    And for composition – the last photo has such cool
    Balance with the two lines from the wires – then the lines from the wooden post and the bird in middle –
    I really like that shot

    Liked by 1 person

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