Picture this …

I have a remarkable tale to share as we creep ever closer to Christmas Day.

As most of you know, I have no siblings, so thus I became the lucky keeper of the family albums where some vintage photographs are from the 1920s. Back in 2017, I spent Thanksgiving weekend digitizing hundreds of sepia-tinted, black-and-white and color photos chronicling years of family, friends and travel. It was time well spent, because prior to that long weekend, if I wanted to peruse those albums, I had to dig through multiple boxes in the bottom of a seldom-used clothes closet, where they were stacked alongside scrapbooks, school yearbooks and other mementos. Not only was retrieving the albums a laborious task, but the more-recent photo albums had begun falling apart, their bindings pulling away from the plastic-overlay pages. The photo albums from years before were still intact, as photos had been placed in gummed photo corners with tissue overlays separating the pages. I love having this treasure trove of memories just a few mouse clicks away and I’ve been able to use these images in blog posts as well. I have some more photos post-1990s in a shoebox which I forgot about, so that will be a future digitizing project.

Here’s something to ponder – as an only child, with no family members left, what if there were no photos of me as a youngster? I’m sure my parents would have told me that I had mousy-brown, stick-straight hair, (except on special occasions when it was set on pin curls for church, or holidays, or school photos and I often looked like I stuck my finger in an electric socket). There were “the real homely years” like when I got cat-eye glasses on my 7th birthday …

… then braces on my teeth when I was 20 years old. This may be the only photo of me smiling with my metal mouth.

Fortunately for me, I didn’t have to wonder about what I looked like because Mom, with her Baby Brownie camera and my father with his Leica 35mm camera, captured countless images and filled those album pages with photos of their little girl.

But what if you never saw your childhood pictures until you were grown with children, or even grandchildren, of your own?

Our neighbors and good family friends are long gone, both having passed away over a decade ago. They had four children, like stair steps – just a year or two apart. Money was tight in those days with four children. The man of the house worked and like most women in the 1950s and 1960s, the woman of the house was a stay-at-home mom. Because they were the same age, my mom would tell me, in their near-daily telephone chats, topics ranged from recipes, household remedies, their offspring or goings-on in the neighborhood, and, because both women were frugal, having grown up in the Depression era, they often discussed how that event impacted them as youngsters.

However, unlike my parents who documented my formative years and beyond with their respective cameras, our neighbors got a Kodak Instamatic camera, one roll of film and a package of flashbulbs and each Christmas they posed their four youngsters in front of the Christmas tree. Snap – one shot. Then the camera was tucked away until the following Christmas.

Some followers of this blog may never have used anything but a digital camera or phone to record images. So, it may be difficult to imagine taking photos, sending the film off to Kodak’s processing facility in New York and waiting weeks for those glossy prints to be returned. It wasn’t cheap either and you’d kick yourself for each photo that was blurred or a boo-boo. That was how it was for many years, then one-hour photo processing took over and picture-taking was suddenly revolutionized. Now, of course, the digital age of photography is here to stay.

Back to the story I wanted to tell you

So, when the roll of film was finally finished, the photos were never developed, but instead the camera was returned for safekeeping in a bureau drawer. Why? Weren’t they curious and wanted to ooh and aah over how their little darlings had grown through the years? One will never know their mindset.

Fast forward a few decades, the kids were long gone, having raised families of their own and they returned to clear out their childhood home after their parents’ deaths in order to put the house up for sale. In doing so, drawers were opened and contents examined. The Kodak camera was discovered and the roll of film processed. The integrity of the film was good despite its age. So, imagine four adults crowded around those photos, seeing their youthful, smiling faces in identical poses each year in front of the Christmas tree. Their parents were never in the photos, just them. I’m sure there were tears in their eyes.

I’ll make this a Throwback Thursday post … here are some of my favorite Christmas photos through the years. My parents similarly had me pose by the Christmas tree or touching it lightly with one hand (in the Summertime, it was standing next to the car.)


Taking photos is easier than ever now. I hope you capture some special memories with loved ones this holiday season.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
This entry was posted in Christmas, Memories and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

70 Responses to Picture this …

  1. J P says:

    Loved the pictures! I also love the Christmas tree progression – real to aluminum to artificial green. Those aluminum trees were must-haves for several years (though not at our house).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks JP – I made up my mind after seeing your post about the Kodak film, I would write the post about this story I mentioned to you. I love old pictures and yes, we went from real trees when I was a kid and once we got the first aluminum tree for Christmas 1963, we never returned to the real deal again. I never cared for the silver tree. We had a blue spotlight trained on it which was the norm back then as I remember seeing that at friends’ homes.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love how your dress and tights match the tree and ornaments in the third tree picture with your mom. All the pictures are priceless, you’re lucky to have them. You have such a cute smile in the one where you’re on the rocking horse. It’s funny how taking pictures has changed over the years. I have tons of pictures of my grandchildren, a few albums of my children, and hardly any pictures of me and my sister… I used to take a picture of my kids on their first day of school every year.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – I remember that was one of my favorite dresses. It was a light glen plaid and had fur trim on the collar and cuffs. We had that tree for three years as I recall, then we moved to the States and got an artificial green tree. That tree had a blue floodlight that revolved around it – that was the style then, your floodlight matched the bulbs and friends had that same type of tree at their homes. The rocking horse picture was in the apartment – we lived in an apartment in Toronto and moved to the suburbs when I was almost three years old. I only had one photo the first day of school. I follow a woman photographer on Facebook. I’ve used some of her holiday pictures in the past. She just became a grandmother five months ago and every month she takes a photo of her granddaughter on a special blanket where you put in how many months old the child is.

      Liked by 1 person

      • We never had an artificial tree growing up. I bought one in, maybe in 2008 or so, and broke out in a huge rash on my arms when I was setting it up. I wound up donating it to Goodwill. I thought it was ironic as my late brother-in-law was allergic to real Christmas trees.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        When we got silver aluminum tree in 1963, I remember my mom putting it together and the aluminum rubbed off on her fingers. The branches were stick straight, no curve to them like green artificial trees and they were color coded to match the “stick” – my mom’s fingers would be black from handling the branches. As to allergies, I had a coworker who always had an artificial tree and when she married, she wanted a real tree. In reaching inside the tree branches to steady it in the stand, she had on short sleeves and she broke out in hives a few minutes later. She described them as huge red welts. Her arms were sticky from the tree resin. She went to the hospital as she had breathing issues – they told her she was allergic to pine resin, likely the same as your brother-in-law.

        Like

  3. I don’t have them from every year. Maybe I have two or three years but my family was not a picture taking family until us kids grew up and bought ourselves cameras. I wish I had more of my dad. I only had a few of my mom but she was active in choirs and such so there are those photos with her in it. I always enjoy looking at the styles (hair, clothes, glasses) and wondering what we were thinking!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      My mom gave me her Baby Brownie when I got a little older, then I had a Kodak pocket camera for years – I probably could have mentioned that but that camera was a workhorse and I carried it with me everywhere, even with friends or at work. The nice thing was you could just hand it over to someone and they didn’t have to fiddle with knobs or which button to press. The hairdos and glasses made kids look old I think – I look at the picture of me with the cat-eye glasses, wavy hair and velveteen bow headband and really DO wonder about those styles back in the day. I wrote a post once on fashions and fishnets and go-go boots, miniskirts, skimmer dresses and who could forget those pot-holder vests. We wore them all!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Sandra J says:

    I love seeing your older photos and the silver tree. My favorite. Husband noticed the quilt hanging in the background of the first photo, he said someone worked hard on that one. I think I had similar hair styles and the cat eye glasses. My sister and I both had those. 🙂 Merry Christmas Linda

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Sandra. We got the tree in 1963 and used it for three Christmasses. The last Christmas was with my poodle Peppy just before we moved over here. The quilt was made by my great-grandmother. I don’t know why it was hanging on the window – guessing it was cold in that room or in lieu of drapes? It was at the apartment – we lived in an apartment in Toronto until I was three, then moved to the suburbs. My great-grandmother lived on a farm and made down and patchwork quilts. This quilt was a deep red with white contrast and I can picture it as I write this. I had a patchwork quilt in a sunburst motif which was powder blue on my bed when I got my first bed. My parents had a gold satin down comforter she made from their geese and duck feathers. It ripped a seam and I remember feathers going everywhere. The styles were the same from our era, even though you are a little younger than me. Merry Christmas Sandra.

      Like

  5. Ally Bean says:

    Your photos are delightful. They capture moments in time as well as, maybe better than, our plethora of digital ones. I take your point about how if no one kept photos of you as a child how would you know what you looked like? A profound question.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the photos Ally. I figured I had enough Christmas photos to accompany this tale of my growing-up years to compare to these kids who never knew any photos existed until their own kids were grown. Thank goodness people even took pictures in the “olden days” – look at Eileen Lyon’s posts with her vintage pictures. I have a photo of my grandparents holding my mom as a newborn in 1926 and that B&W photo is remarkably sharp, almost 96 years later!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. whenever there i a fire, earthquake or any other sort of emergency, the first thing people grab on their way out are the photo albums as they are usually their most treasured item!
    Photos are visual time machines that take us back to that moment and proof to others that we were really that dorky when we were younger!
    The recent evolution of photography has made it so easy that a family pet can take great pictures!

    Thanks for a peek into your own evolution Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked my evolution Wayne. The camera was always out when I was growing up and later my mom gave me her Baby Brownie and then I got a Kodak Pocket Camera and finally wore it out as the film door wasn’t shutting properly from putting in/taking out film cartridges so much. The one picture was from a Polaroid Swinger Land Camera I got for Christmas one year – what a mess it was to specially coat each photo when it exited the camera. But instant gratification there and no worries you had a blurred photo. I have some really dorky photos growing up especially after I got glasses and also my mom setting my hair in pincurls and trying to make me have curly hair. I cannot imagine growing to adulthood and never seeing a single photo of yourself though – that just amazed me.

      Liked by 1 person

      • you started your photography a long time ago!
        We all look back at ourselves and want to hide the pictures! But people do not see what we see…..thankfully!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes! I hated to retire the pocket camera as it gave me many years of photos – I took it everywhere I went. I was looking at those online albums to compile this post and there are some really dorky pictures in there and a lot of it is the styles too. I think we are really critical of ourselves. I only had that one picture in braces – I had the old kind of braces that wrapped around each touch, plus I had rubber bands to connect bottom to top. We moved to the States and my mom did not drive (she never drove a car) and I was supposed to get braces on my teeth, but my father didn’t want to take time off work to take me to the orthodontist once a month, so I got braces when I could drive myself. I don’t look at all like my mom, but am a spittin’ image of my father. I’d have rather looked like my mom – she had dark curly hair and never wore glasses until her 50s and then just for reading.

        Like

  7. Anne says:

    What a lovely post! I once had cat eye glasses with black frames. Thank you for sharing these photographs of you through time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Anne – it is remarkable to think that these kids got to see themselves many years later in the annual Christmas tree pose, something that my parents also did for years as you can see here. It was a fun post to compile. I hated those cat-eye glasses and got them on my 7th birthday on top of it!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. A lovely post Linda. How time flys when you go through the years in pictures and the provoked memories. Have a great Christmas 🎄

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Andy – same to you. I think that cameras were one of the best inventions ever. I am glad you enjoyed this post. I am happy I have this treasure trove of photos to put it together.

      Like

  9. Laurie says:

    Linda…you were an adorable youngster! I loved seeing the photos of you when you were a kid and a young adult. My parents, like yours, documented my younger years with many pictures. My dad even had a little 8(?) mm movie camera, which he used to take movies of us when we lived at home. In fact, I am pretty sure he took movies of my oldest son when he was a baby too. The movies were eventually transferred to a VHS tape, which my sister has, but neither of us has a VHS player any longer. I guess we will have to have the old VHS digitized if we want to watch the old movies.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Laurie! I knew I would be able to find enough photos of me through the years at Christmastime for this post about the neighbors and the joy that their surprise photos brought. Seeing all these photos taken through the years gives me joy too and I’m glad my mom sat down with me and told me who everyone was in the really old photos. My parents bought me a small movie camera – not sure what type though. I took it into work and took pictures at the ad agency and we had a projector there to view the film. I never had a projector. I know you can use Legacybox, a company that you ship your photos and/or VHS tapes or film reels and they will convert to digital format. I have one film reel I shot with that camera and a shoebox full of pictures taken after the early 90s which never made it into the albums. P.S. Before I got the scanner, I took a few pictures to have them made into digital images for Christmas cards. I just checked and they convert VHS to DVD or Blue Ray (see below):
      Walgreens does indeed convert VHS to DVD through its Photo Labs services. You have to pay a minimum of $34.98 to convert one VHS tape to one DVD, paying $9.99 extra for each additional DVD and $19.99 for each Blu-ray disc.

      Like

  10. Joni says:

    A lovely and enjoyable read Linda! I could really relate to the clothes and the hairstyles. and you look very happy with your dogs! I esp. like your red sweater with the matching v-neck vest. I was going to do a blog on sweater weather, and that was the style in Glamour magazine, but mine was brown. That must have been wonderful for those kids to look back at their younger selves. My mom didn’t take many pictures, as film was expensive to develop, so I have only a few from Christmas.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      PS. My sister had the same black Barbie case! Mine was blue and double sided.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Shiny vinyl and I kept it for years and years, along with Barbie and the clothes, many which my mom knit. Good times playing with Barbie dolls with my little pals back in the day.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I still have my dolls and the case and the clothes!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        When I worked at the diner, my boss, who I thought of like a grandfather, had a young granddaughter, probably six years old. She was in to visit with her parents one day and had a doll with her. I mentioned Barbie dolls and she didn’t have any so I asked her if she would like mine and her face lit up. I asked her parents to bring Jan back the next day and I gave her the case, Barbie and wardrobe. My mother, a stickler for containing clutter kept saying to me “really Linda – you’re not going to play with those Barbies or listen to those records (the 45s) in that big case you bought in the 70s, so why not get rid of them?” I didn’t get rid of the 45s for a long time after that and I even contacted an oldies station to ask if they wanted them for anything. They went on location a lot for car cruise events and I thought they might want something authentic, but they didn’t want them. We have an Applebee’s restaurant near us – do you have that franchise in Canada? They are touted as being a “neighborhood eatery” and encourage people to bring in mementos which they hang on the walls or frame them. After they opened, they had a story in the local paper asking if people were willing to donate items for their decor. So they amassed a lot of local sports memorabilia, some like MLB pitcher Steve Avery’s high school baseball memorabilia, and I gave them my high school mortarboard tassel and we had beanies we wore to football games. Our colors were orange and blue and everything had President Lincoln’s insignia on it (we were Railsplitters). So they put my items in with other local high school mementos. I read sometimes about dolls which are now worth a lot of money and wonder if I should have kept them?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I think they are so many vintage Barbies, every boomer girl had one, that I can’t imagine they would be worth anything, esp. worn out like mine were. I saw my double blue case in a toy display at a local museum. We don’t have Applebee’s here, but I wish we did as I have seen the tv commercials and it looks good.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It is amazing how much some of the “retro stuff” goes for. The aluminum trees were on eBay a few years ago and selling for a pretty penny. Applebee’s has tasty food – we used to go for their “riblets” which were not messy, but fall-of-the-bone mini ribs and onion petals which were like onion rings, only dainty. I haven’t been there in a while though.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked it Joni – since we’re almost the same age, I know you can relate. I’m sure you had one of velvet headbands with the bow too that were all the style back then. The first dog was Peppy which we had back in Canada and the second dog was my aunt’s dog Muffin. Frances lived upstairs in my grandmother’s house. He was a Cockapoo. The Santa Claus photo was also taken at my grandmother’s house at Christmas 1985, a month before she passed away. A neighbor and his son dressed up as Santa and an elf and came in to surprise us on Christmas Eve, so I always had the Kodak pocket camera handy. I did a post on that last Christmas and the surprise visit a few years ago. I am surprised my parents took a lot of photos as I know things were tight back then for them too. I guess they made that exception, especially after we moved to Oakville in 1959.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I meant to add Joni that the uncomfortable rocking chair I mentioned in your Grannychic post is pictured in this post (the photo where I am wearing braces). That is my grandmother visiting us and she looks huge, like she is melting into the chair. She sat in it for the picture and said “how can you sit in this thing – I sank down and can’t sit up straight!” She was very short and kept slipping out of it, despite the cushion and going backward. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I loved seeing all those photos of you. What fun!

    I think my brother has our old albums. The pictures were mostly black and white. My folks believed in whole-body photos, so the faces are so far from the camera that you can’t tell much about them. I’m not interested in them and am glad they aren’t cluttering up our house.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’m glad my mom sat down with me and told me who was in the really old photo albums. Those photos are in remarkably good condition for their age. The travel photos I organized by using Dynamo label tape beneath each photo as I’m not sure I’d remember each photo all these years later.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. AnnMarie stevens says:

    Linda…………………………………….I enjoyed your story about your history of film development over the years……………………yes I remember how we eagerly waited to get back our rolls of film and enjoyed looking at our pictures as we were growing up………………………………..too……………………….by the way…………………..you were good looking all through your years of growing up………………………………I enjoyed it thank you…………………………………………..Merry Christmas

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne Marie – I am glad you enjoyed the photos and also for the compliment. There are plenty of homely photos of me in the collection of pictures from the albums as well. The film story was fascinating to me. Merry Christmas to you too.

      Like

  13. peggy says:

    Nice. I have a few Christmas photos from film in black and white, but my family did not take many pictures. Nice to see your pictures from the past. I had three siblings who could care less about photos and so I ended up with the family photos when my parents died. Memories are wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Oh my, those aluminum so-called Christmas trees! What abominations! We, when i was a kid, had one. They are so unnatural that it is truly sacrilegious. Thank goodness, that they are not very popular any longer! I didn’t like aluminum trees as a kid… and i still think that they are awful.
    My, Linda, you were a real cutie (and probably still are)! Makes me wish that you lived closer!
    Christmas, i feel, is such a very magical, sweet time of year! It’s about sharing, giving, compassion, and kindness, really… and it is so very special!
    Hoping that your Christmas is magical, Linda, and aluminum-tree-free! 🎄🎄🎅🤶🎄🎄

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      We had one for three Christmases in a row, then moved here and opted for green artificial. Did you have the revolving spotlight too? They were all the rage too. We had the blue one, but they came in green, or red and even multi-color. Your hands got all black from the aluminum posts … not my favorite either. Enjoy your Christmas too Tom. The magical season when everyone is on their best behavior is over all too soon!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. bekitschig says:

    Hi Linda, that was a really fun post! I love how your stockings match the blue of the bobbles on that strange looking tree! My favorite are the cat glasses though. Très chic!
    Enjoy the festive season!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked it Jeanine. That is a very kitschy-looking tree wasn’t it? Too bad the blue floodlight wasn’t turned on it for the picture. Nowadays people are looking on eBay to buy one. Yes, it looks like I was competing with the tree’s colors! I am sure those glasses may be très chic if they were black frames and diamond-encrusted, but these were a light pink – ugh! I used to pretend that they were broken and take them off at school … of course I couldn’t see a thing. Youth! You enjoy this festive season too – reality comes back oh too soon on January 3rd!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Oh, Linda, I wish you could see the smile on my face. This is a delightful post, I do love seeing your photos of you as you grew up. You’re so lucky your parents took so many photos. And that they let you wear blue stockings to match the blue ornaments and encouraged you to touch the object you were near, that’s so precious! I found a couple of rolls of film that we developed years later. It was fun to see them that’s for sure. Blurry ones and all. You’re such a beautiful friend, Linda!! Merry Christmas to you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Shelley – you make my head swell. 🙂 I wanted to tell that story of the film for a while and a fellow blogger found some film that was decades old and I said “I’ve got to tell this tale too.” Amazing you found film and it was okay – what a wonderful surprise! I have a shoebox of pictures and a movie reel from a movie camera I had and will get those digitized later. I could not find photo pages that matched the album – it was not Hallmark but an oddball brand from a stationery store and they no longer carried pages. So I put them there in the box – I think the box is photos of how I decorated through the years as we had a lot of country Christmas items and I took pics so I knew where everything went. It’s a small house and the regular knickknacks had to be put away. In the Summer I had to stand next to the car, usually on a birthday or Easter Sunday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome. You have wonderful memories to share with us. Each box of treasures leads to a tale to tell. My youngest has now taken on the family ‘historian’ role and she’s loving it going through old photos. My mom always wanted me to do that and I never took the time. Your parents set you up well with organized plans and traditions to help you keep them in order through the years.
        Thanks for sharing with us, Linda!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That’s great about your daughter Shelley – I remember you said she was working on the “tree” at and compiling info at Thanksgiving in your post about that holiday. I heard on the radio that Ancestry has a chance to search their database this week until Friday for free with a radio promotion. It’s good to have the old pictures as a starting point for researching about the family – good luck to your daughter on this big project.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, she’s loving the project. It’s amazing how much she’s found for free so far, and she’s excited to see what else she can find on Ancestry. Thanks for the well-wishes!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        The keeper of the records – it’s good that someone is doing this.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. I love the old photos! I can’t imagine not having pictures of our family as my brothers and I were growing up. Somehow I ended up with the main photo album… I should probably get the pictures digitized like you did so I can share them with my brothers. Thank you for sharing your sweet memories with us!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I enjoyed so much the whole post. The picture with your mom, I loved it, and also the one with your dog. All of them are sweet. Sending you a wholehearted hug, Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Martha – I am glad you enjoyed the post. It was fun to put together too as that was quite a story. The good old days and I am very grateful for cameras and all the pictures taken through the years. Thanks for the hug – back at you and best for the new year!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s