Frozen Foray!  #Wordless Wednesday  #Shiver on the River #Primo spot for eagles  

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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65 Responses to Frozen Foray!  #Wordless Wednesday  #Shiver on the River #Primo spot for eagles  

  1. peggy says:

    Oh Brrrr and double Brrrrrrrrr!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. bekitschig says:

    That looks lovely Linda! We have about 4 degrees, so it’s cold but never cold enough to be pretty! Enjoy.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Jeanine – glad you liked the photos because despite being cold, it was very beautiful. I was at the River a few years ago and it was during a Polar Vortex that had lasted a week and the waves were much higher and those square slabs of ice were laying up against the shore – huge slabs that were amazing to see. We’re set for a very cold spell the next ten days. And this morning it was balmy (5 C) like a Spring day.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. I’m shivering. Reminds me of the times I walked by an inlet as jagged pieces of ice floated by. It didn’t happen every year.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I remember you told me you used to walk past it near your workplace if I recall correctly and in good weather there were geese. To me, it is amazing to see this and I was there during a Polar Vortex a few years ago and the big waves had frozen in mid air and the square slabs of ice broken up by the Coast Guard ice cutter ship were banked up on the shoreline like dominoes. The Detroit River is big and a fast current to freeze up like this.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I walked early in the morning near our home, where the quaint village overlooked the water. It was a lovely place to walk, though it could be brutally cold in winter.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Linda Schaub says:

        OK, I didn’t remember and thought you walked near your workplace maybe at lunch. My friend lives in Honeoye Falls, in Mendon, NY. It is a quaint little village where they try to keep out any franchisees to keep only small shops in town. My friend took up walking a few years ago, but chipped a bone in one foot walking on so many rural roads so had to give up walking. But she used to take her phone and snap pics along the way … they have a beautiful waterfall which ices up in Winter as do the ponds. Winter can be beautiful sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • That sounds like an ideal place to live.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It does and I think it is referred to as a hamlet which makes it sound even more quaint.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. ruthsoaper says:

    How long will it take you to get to 9999?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – maybe I should set my sights on that as a goal for year end? When I first started walking in 2012, I decided my goal at year end would be never to drive more miles than I walked. And I didn’t … then I was walking maybe 300-400 miles a year and I’d come under that mark. Then the mechanic said “you have to run this car more than just this or you’ll get electrical problems.” So I’ve gone to bigger parks and driven more. My car is a 2009. I’ll let you know how I do at year-end Ruth.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        In 2020 my dad decided for health reasons to give up driving. He gave me his 2012 ford edge in exchange for me being his driver. We had to replace all 4 tires even though the treads were goo the sidewalls had dry rotted because he didn’t drive it often. Waiting to see that 9999. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I still have my original tires and would worry after reading this, but I just went to a tire shop in the Fall, when I got an alert from my OnStar that my tire pressure was really low in two tires. The owner discovered two valve stems caps were missing and told me that people were going around stealing them and I likely interrupted them and they didn’t finish the other side. I guess he would have mentioned dry rot. Good to know that info Ruth. I’ll try to reach that 9,999 milestone for you … I drove rather than walked to the Park today, so I’m up to 9,111 miles … woo hoo!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Laurie says:

    Brrr…hope you were bundled up out there!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. cold just looking at the views

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, the real feel was half the temperature Andy and it was the 9 o’clock hour so pretty brutal. See the right side of the River, the water was flowing … lots of ducks there, but too far away to take a picture. They were all huddled together … can’t blame them!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ally Bean says:

    Beautiful scenes, but I’m cold just looking at them.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it was pretty Ally … the ice slabs near the shoreline fascinate me. They pile up on the shoreline like dominoes, slammed across the ice, wherever they settled. Sometimes a Coast Guard ice cutter goes through and makes a path for the freighters that are still running before shutting down for the rest of the Winter.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. J P says:

    It is fascinating to think of the forces involved in heaving those hunks of ice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • J P says:

      And wow, 9000 miles. You’ve had that car awhile, I hope both of you live to see 10,000. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Ha ha – yes another blogger asked when I might reach 9,999? My car is a 2009 LaCrosse and yes, this is the first go-around on the odometer. When I started my walking regimen in 2012, for a few years my goal was to walk more miles than I drove every year, so I did many errands on foot to accomplish that goal. But, then the car was in for a new battery, or some routine maintenance and the mechanic suggested nicely that I need to drive more or I’d be getting electrical problems. Maybe I ought to make 10,000 a year-end goal this year?

        Like

      • J P says:

        Haha, I thought I recognized that dash, my mother’s last car was an 06 LaCrosse. My son is still driving it, with maybe 45000 on it.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You have a good eye JP. That car is a baby too, with only 45,000 miles on it. Before the LaCrosse I had a 1988 Buick Regal. It was 21 years old when I got rid of it as it had too many electrical issues and I didn’t feel safe in it – it had 84,000 miles on it. I often mused how I racked up that many miles as I took the bus to work in downtown Detroit for decades and just walked to the bus stop.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes it is JP and the Detroit River is not only wide, but a fast current. This is early to have frozen solid like this – usually that doesn’t happen until mid-February. The slabs of ice often come from a Coast Guard ice cutter while the freighters are still running. A few years ago, one of the lighthouses on the Detroit River was severely damaged by those slabs of ice pummeling the sides of the wooden base.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Dave says:

    I love the comments about the odometer instead of the temperature so obviously the reason for the photo. It’s like they’re pretending they don’t see “12 degrees”. And “Shiver on the River”… another LOL-Lindalliteration!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You’re right Dave … you are the only one who didn’t comment on the 12 degrees in that photo that I decided to use to substantiate my claim in my last post that it was 12 degrees (and a wind chill of 6) rather than using a screenshot from a weather site. I was bummed that the flash blurred the 12 a little. My car is a 2009 LaCrosse so I guess I am what you call a Sunday driver. When I started the walking regimen, I tried to walk more miles than I drove. But while that was good for me – it was bad for the car. I do love my alliteration and I like that word you coined too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Eilene Lyon says:

    Looks pretty darn cold!! Where are the seals and polar bears?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      They sure would seem like they belong there don’t they Eileen? We usually have several eagles that stay on Mud Island in the Winter and they fish off the ice floes, only it was too early for any to show up, so it was pretty desolate down there at the River.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Hahaha you have more miles in shoes than you do your car!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You’re right – I do Diane! And I used to try to walk more miles than I drove in the car and did that for several years after beginning the walking regimen and even “reported” on feet versus car miles, but the mechanic said I needed to drive the car more or it would have electrical issues, so I relented. 🙂

      Like

  12. Ice-cold illustrated! Brrrrr… My fingers are getting numb just looking at these pictures… Congratulations on getting out there! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – yes, the ice was amazing to see, especially the square slabs that gather around the shoreline and waves that freeze in place. It’s even more picturesque when there is snow at Dingell Park, but there was none.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Those ice plates are amazing. It’ll be interesting to see when they begin to melt. Great photos!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Esther – it is amazing how the ice slams those big squares on top of one another. At Elizabeth Park, the ice plates end up shattering on the rocks. It was wam for 1/2 a day so at the Park the ice began to melt, so I suspect it has melted at the River too. The waves freezing in mid-air always amazes me.

      Like

  14. Joni says:

    You have a lot of ice in the river compared to us. I’ve given up on looking for eagles this winter – it’s just too darn cold!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought so too – I went down there thinking I’d see some ice floes and maybe some swans and ducks, but found solid ice instead, although farther down the River, where the photographer was, you can see some melting – that’s where the ducks were congregating, but too far away to get a picture of them and by then it was just too cold to be comfortable.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Sandra J says:

    Brrrrr, those ice chunks look like glass out there.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Yikes…you were brave to go out in that weather! Winds and ice do not make for an ice fishing-friendly spot. Cool pictures though ;-)! Stay warm!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Those are eagles in the sky? How great is that (we have hawks here but no eagles)? I imagine they didn’t pay much attention to the No Fishing sign 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha – no they ignore the sign Janis, but the amazing thing is the eagles only show up in the Winter time to sit on the ice floes and fish from them. They go to the uninhabited island across from this park (Mud Island) and sit in the trees looking for big fish, then swoop down. There was a juvenile eagle down there but those were seagulls in the one picture … they were all sitting on the ice, then something started them and they took off. I’ll go down there again, hopefully when it’s a little bit warmer – it was 6 real feel.

      Like

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