Harry the Heron goes fishing. #Wordless Wednesday #Watch his technique.

Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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71 Responses to Harry the Heron goes fishing. #Wordless Wednesday #Watch his technique.

  1. peggy says:

    Wow – great photos Linda. I have never managed to photograph one of these birds with a fish in its mouth.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. J P says:

    Great photos! BTW, I realize that your blog disappeared from my WP reader somehow. I had to find it and follow it again.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You got the whole sequence. Marvelous!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Herons are so pretty. Somewhat prehistoric looking but huge and beautiful! Great shots.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. trumstravels says:

    Herons are so great and I agree with your friend, they are prehistoric looking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      They amaze me how they look a little gawky looking standing there, weighing only five pounds, but in flight they look so streamlined. Harry is this Park’s resident heron and usually bolts once he sees the whites of my eyes. The fishin’ was too good to pass up – he caught five fish in five minutes.

      Liked by 1 person

      • trumstravels says:

        They are super good at fishing aren’t they?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, they are. I was Huroc Park a few years ago and the Huron River flows through this Huroc Park and there is a dam. Where the water gushes out, was a sloped cement bricked area and a heron was standing there lopsided watching the fish flipping out of the water from the dam. He was catching fish left and right. I came home with tons of pictures of him. A fellow blogger had a video or pictures of a big fish the heron swallowed whole and the fish was moving around as it traveled down the heron’s neck. Really something to see!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Harry scores! I sometimes wonder how does it feel to have a fish flipping about in ones stomach?
    It doesn’t get any fresher!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Anne says:

    These are all great photographs, Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Laurie says:

    You are an amazing nature photographer, Linda. Maybe that’s your retirement job??? 😉

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you very much Laurie! I was lucky that morning, because Harry usually sees me and takes off screeching and squawking. He got five fish in five minutes. I am really looking forward to retirement for long nature walks and using the camera more. That would be a dream job for me! Thank you again (and welcome home).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked him Ellie. Harry was on a roll that morning – he caught five fish in five minutes. And he stayed in place for a while, instead of screeching at me and taking off.

      Like

  9. Ally Bean says:

    Good job, Harry!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. It’s amazing how adept they are at catching fish! 😁

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Linda Schaub says:

    You’re right Tom – he caught five fish in five minutes (which I was going to use as my title). He was cooperative and didn’t screech and take off like he usually does.

    Like

  12. Eilene Lyon says:

    “Gotcha!” Says the heron. Nice sequence of shots. Our river is running so muddy right now that I suspect the herons are having a real challenge catching anything at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Eilen. Yes Harry got five fish in five minutes – he was on a roll that morning. I have seen him fishing from that same ledge and bending down without going into the water, usually when the water is very cold.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I shooed him out of my pond for days. I’m glad he came to see you! Lol

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Joni says:

    That was great! I’m so jealous as I’ve never seen any kind of a heron.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Joni – I was at Council Point Park one weekday morning and Harry usually leaves once he sees me while screeching loudly, but I think he was so engrossed in fishing, he didn’t care if I was watching him. He got five fish in five minutes – he was on a roll. We have Green Herons and Black-Crowned Herons around here too, but they are small and not with long legs. I have seen only one of each of those herons but the Great Blue Heron is more common.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Well done, Harry! Great photos, Linda! I’ve never got that close to a great blue heron before, let alone one on a fishing trip!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara! Usually, when I round the bend at Council Point Park and Harry sees me, he lets out a screech that could wake the dead, then he flies away. But this time, he must have been really hungry and just ignored me altogether. He caught five fish in five minutes, so he was on a roll! I was fairly close to him, maybe 20 feet. Have you returned to the Nature Center at Mystic to look for your little family?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Haven’t had a chance to check on the goose family in a few days but I have my doubts they’ll be back…

        Like

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I hope they were just MIA that day Barbara. I know my heart sank when I couldn’t find my family either. Fingers crossed they are okay. Here at the Detroit Zoo, a Wallaby joey was lost last weekend. He had just began having out-of-pouch privileges but was still nursing. He was the size of a rabbit and the Zoo officials have concluded he likely was taken by an airborne predator, likely an owl or hawk. They should have been more careful with that youngster. The mom is doing fine (though how do they really know for sure … surely she misses her baby).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh no, Linda, that is so sad about the wallaby joey. Life is so precious and precarious. I’m sad about a little 7-year-old girl who died in a house fire this weekend. Her father was badly burned trying to save her. It’s so tragic when any parent loses a little one.

        Like

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I feel badly too Barbara and wonder why there wasn’t netting or protection over the area?. We have so many house fires, especially in the Winter months with people using space heaters – sometimes the parents get out, but not the children. These incidents take their toll on firefighters when children are involved. We also have so many young children die from random shootings or freeway shootings. I am just 13 miles from Detroit and most of the shootings happen in Detroit or area freeways. A man was just sentenced to 70 years in prison for a road rage incident that killed a toddler.

        Like

  16. Hungry Harry! Great shots of him and his fishing techniques, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. ruthsoaper says:

    A great series of photos Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. What a treat to see Harry catch some fish! And what a treat for you to get so close and capture it all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Sabine! You’re right – Harry bolts every time he sees me and rarely ever stays to fish once I am nearby. I was fairly close to him and able to see his interesting fishing techniques.

      Like

  19. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………………………..Ha Ha Ha ……………….waiting all that timeand Mr Heron only got a little snack……………………………….I sometimes get to see him or his cousin……………………………………eating a bigger fish for a dinner meal…………………………….mmmm………………..or is it for his breakfast!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well Ann Marie, those little shad fish all add up and he caught five of them in a row. Probably just an appetizer to him, but I think he was feeling proud of himself. 🙂 Your pond has fish in it now?

      Like

  20. Prior... says:

    This was fun
    The fourth photo down was my fav because of the foot placement
    Like posing for us

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Nice job catching the fishing show! They are such funny birds to watch. I’m amazed by their eyes on the side of their heads and that they can catch a fish as easily as they do.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Shelley! Harry the Heron usually flies away, squawking at me for interrupting his breakfast, but the fishing must have been great as he tolerated me and caught/downed five fish in a row. I was lucky to get so close to him. A fellow blogger once had pics or a video of a heron swallowing a fish whole; the fish was flip-flopping around as it traveled down its throat.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re welcome. You have mastered the sneak up on Heron technique.
        That must be interesting to watch – their stomach acid must be SO powerful otherwise it would be weird to walk around with a live fish in one’s stomach.
        I remember watching a snake eat a mouse…ew, that’s gross too.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think the shad must be running at the Creek. Remember the wall-to-wall shad in the Creek last Winter? I was fascinated how the Creek was thick with fish and the ducks were paddling through it. Eww! That area is also a prime location for people to fish off that ledge. There’s a guy named Jacob who fishes there all year around – he throws them back, no matter the size. I think the snake eating a mouse would make me feel sick. I was walking at the Park the other day and there was a half-eaten mouse on the path – ugh. A hawk must’ve dropped it. Better a mouse than a squirrel.

        Like

      • Yes, I remember the wall-to-wall from last winter. Jacob reminds me of my son-in-law, he loves to just go fishing for practice in improving his technique.
        Yes, a snake eating is quite the sight to see or close your eyes to.
        It’s sad to see, yet, there’s a pecking order and each animal serves a purpose I guess.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Jacob bundles up in the dead of Winter too. He had a young girl with him, a granddaughter/daughter? She was maybe two or three years old. But she had caught a fish and already thrown it back. I took her picture to use in an upcoming post.

        The circle of life is hard to take sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You have a gift of observing and story telling, Linda, keep sharing and caring.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you Shelley – my walks, especially those in Parks, is keeping me sane in a sometimes insane world. Then there are the critters – like the bird building a nest inside a lamp post head. Always something to smile about. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I agree, the walks are excellent therapy. Speaking of lamp post nests, we have an eagle family that built on top of the warning siren for our neighborhood. Thankfully it doesn’t go off often, but can you imagine being a small eagle not quite ready to take flight and have that LOUD thing go off? 🤔

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I get a picture in my mind of that small eagle using its wings to cover its ears! 🙂 A few years ago an osprey family built a nest on a electrical utility pole. It had eggs in it. So DTE had to move the nest as they were afraid the family would get electrocuted or their presence might cause a power outage for neighboring residents/businesses. They decided to move the nest and eggs to a specially built pole. The osprey parents were watching the entire time. DTE removed the eggs, put them aside for safekeeping, then returned them after they relocated the nest.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Aw, that’s a cute picture. Wow – that’s incredible and heart-warming.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. TD says:

    Fun photo sequence of Harry in the action, along with your story telling, Linda. The Great Blue Heron is one of my favorite in the sea water to watch! Enjoyed your post today!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you so much for saying that TD. I’ve been walking at Council Point Park since 2013 and this is the first time Harry, the resident heron, stayed in place for so long allowing me to get those photos. He usually bolts and squawks and screeches when he sees me, unless his back is turned. He caught five fish in five minutes – he was on a roll!

      Like

  23. You are lucky with these action shots!! It’s like a moment by moment snippet of the Heron catching its fish. Nice photos.
    The sole long feather on is crown is distinctive and good looking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I was mesmerized by his fishing prowess Esther. Usually he takes off, but this time, he patiently kept fishing … five fish in five minutes was quite the fishing expedition for him. Herons are so distinctive looking. In the air, they have a streamlined appearance, legs and feet out behind them and quite the wingspan – they only weigh five pounds at the most, in part due to having hollow bones.

      Like

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