Mr. Tree says:  “Come up and see my etchings!”  #Wordless Wednesday #Beetle graffiti!

Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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35 Responses to Mr. Tree says:  “Come up and see my etchings!”  #Wordless Wednesday #Beetle graffiti!

  1. A peek into what goes on underneath a tree’s bark. Insect activity maybe? Fascinating!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was just reading some of the comments and each of you guessed it was an insect making mischief with this tree under the bark and I never thought of that! I was fascinated as well Barbara. I knew it was not birds nor weather caused it. It is in a lagoon and far enough from the overlook that no one could tamper with the tree. I was stymied!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s amazing what those bugs create under the bark. No wonder the woodpeckers are attracted to them. Cool photos!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Bark Beatles tunnelling make beautiful patterns

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Eilene Lyon says:

    Beetle graffiti!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Eilene – I read the comments before I began replying and was amazed to learn everyone knew insects caused the marks. I had no idea! I think I should add “Beetle graffiti” to my already-long title. (Maybe strike “Kilroy” – likely no one knew who Kilroy was anyway.) It was amazing to see on this tree and I knew no one tampered with the tree as it is in the lagoon away from the wooden outlook.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Prior... says:

    Well isn’t this interesting!
    I wonder how that happened / perhaps a parasite in the cambium layer?
    Either way
    This made for a great wordless post as we looked at the etchings, the top break area, and other parts
    Wonder the story …..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yvette – it never occurred to me it might be a parasite making mischief. I took pictures of the tree which is in a lagoon, far enough from the wooden outlook that I knew it was not human mischief. No beak peck marks either, so birds were not to blame, so I was stymied, but I liked the pattern. I read through the comments before I began replying and it appears the general consensus is beetles chomping through the bark/wood and creating these etchings. Nature is so interesting sometimes. I learned something today.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Laurie says:

    Great photos! My Colorado son and daughter-in-law got some wood from those beetle-etched trees and had flooring and a bookcase made out of it. It’s beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Laurie – I’ll bet that flooring and bookcase are unique. What a great idea! I thought it looked like primitive cave drawings and knew they were not man-made, nor caused by birds’ beaks as it was not riddled with holes. It never dawned on me it was the handiwork of insects. I learned something today!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Very nice! Ellis called them tree tattoos. lol. I hope a bird doesn’t hurt its butt on the top of that sharp trunk.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Very clever Ellis! Esther, I have never heard of beetles making those marks under the bark and I thought they looked like caveman drawings. How fascinating! Yes, ouch with that sharp landing if a bird was daydreaming!

      Like

  8. Definitely insects making that fascinating design.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Insects competing with us regarding our Etch-a-Sketch days! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ha ha Tom – you are exactly right! I spent many hours with my Etch-a-Sketch back in the day.
      I think I was the only person who did not know these etchings were the work of insects. I changed the title to reflect what I learned from all the bloggers who were in the know. 🙂

      Like

  10. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………..graffiti………………………on trees!!!!……………………….a form of art!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. J P says:

    I pity the poor defenseless tree when the beetles or borers get under its bark. Where was Woody Woodpecker when he was needed?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes JP – our childhood pal Woody the Woodpecker was MIA. I was red-faced that I thought it was an imprint from the bark and didn’t realize it was beetles or borers; we had two Oak trees that got Carpenter Ants and had to be cut down. We also cut down a Locust as the pest control service deemed it “only a matter of time.”

      Like

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