Sandhill Cranes at Lake Erie Metropark  #Wordless Wednesday  #The Three Musketeers

Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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61 Responses to Sandhill Cranes at Lake Erie Metropark  #Wordless Wednesday  #The Three Musketeers

  1. Anne says:

    You have a slew of interesting photographs here 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow – great photos. You got up close to them. Wonder what they were looking for? They like to eat snakes I think.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. peggy says:

    Ah, the 3 musketeers. I wondered what they looked like. Ha Great photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Laurie says:

    Wow! So cool that you got such a close up look at the cranes. I saw them only from a distance when we visited my son in Colorado, but got a chance to see them up close at my sister’s house in Florida. (Sorry for the recent silence – we just got back from Iceland!)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was so exciting to see them Laurie. Once I saw the trio landing, I recognized them from some birders’ posts on Twitter. Those birders are not photographing Sandhill Cranes in my area, so I figure this might be a one-time event.

      Welcome back! I remember you mentioned an upcoming race in Iceland awhile ago, but I don’t know if you said when it took place. You and Bill have had a travel-filled, enjoyable Summer!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Zazzy says:

    Oh, my word! I love those cranes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      They were amazing to see Zazzy, especially since I have never read about any sightings in my area – the northern, more rural areas yes, not near me. I was happy they weren’t skittish like herons or egrets and just grazed and I could watch and photograph them. What a day!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Zazzy says:

        I once had a whole bew of partridges land in my drive in Wyoming. They hung out for quite a while and I snapped as many pictures as I could without startling them. I never got that film developed, you know? But I never saw another partridge. I hope your cranes continue to visit.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That would be exciting to me too Zazzy and I’d take a slew of pictures as well. I have never seen a partridge before. I hope the cranes return, but I do think it was a fluke, but you know I will look for them, just as much as hoping to find another doe and fawn. Do you know where your film is? My neighbors had an Kodak Instamatic camera and took one photo of their four kids every year in front of the Christmas tree. They never developed the film and after both parents passed away and the house was emptied to be sold, their four kids found the camera and film and had it developed. There was nothing wrong with film, though it was many decades old. Their parents never took other photos of them growing up, so it was a great flashback for them.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. They are impressive birds! So are your photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sandra J says:

    These photos really show the red feather crown, 🙂 nice

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Rebecca says:

    Wonderful photos, Linda. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Nancy Ruegg says:

    I love sandhill cranes with their red crowns and distinctive, warble-y call! We saw them frequently during our 40 years in Florida; haven’t seen any at all since moving to Ohio. But that’s OK–now I get to enjoy other species: chickadees, tufted titmice, nuthatches, robins, wrens, purple finches, and many more!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      They sure are odd-sounding and unique-looking birds, that’s for sure Nancy. Did you see these cranes near the water in Florida? A fellow blogger from the UK photographs a lot of shore birds and said he would like to see one. I didn’t think a Sandhill Crane would float on the water, but they pull up their feet and go just like a duck or goose, or they also wade if it is shallow water. I like those other small birds you mention and I see most of them at the parks where I go. They are all so cute (the robin has the occasional attitude though). 🙂

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  10. These cuties are delightful, Linda! I never see any birds like this where I lived in either NorCal or here in Eastern WA. Wonderful images and happy Wednesday to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. ruthsoaper says:

    Great photos Linda! I don’t think I ever saw a sandhill crane before. I was able to get some good photos of our green heron last night and will be including them in my next post.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ruth! This was a real treat for me to see these Sandhill Cranes. I follow the Detroit Audubon site and a couple of birder/photographers from my area and I have never seen them posting any Sandhill Crane pictures. A former co-worker/friend lives in Oakland County (Milford) and she sees them at her bird feeder all the time. They tip the feeder to the side with the long bill, then eat the seed off the ground. I have only seen one Green Heron at the Ecorse Marina several years ago. I didn’t know what it was so sent the photo to the DNR and they identified it for me. It had its neck pulled down so I didn’t realize it was a heron.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Joni says:

    Just amazing! especially close up!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I sure lucked out Joni! After they landed and walked around, I was taking pictures, but stayed put and they kept getting closer, so they were just across the vehicle road from me. They are unique looking but beautiful with the red, heart-shaped face!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. right place, right time that cannot be taught only experienced
    great shots Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. These look like such big birds, Linda. How big are they? Are they dangerous to go near, or are they more frightened of us humans?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Hi Hugh – after I saw the Sandhill Cranes, I did some research on them, especially because the noise they made as they flew overhead and while landing was very loud. I learned they are one of the oldest bird species and have been around for at least 2 million years. They stand 3-4 feet (00 – 1.2 m) tall and have a wingspan of up to 7 feet (2.0 m). I also learned that they have at least 18 different vocalizations, including a piercing rattle that can be heard up to 2 ½ mils (4 km) away. The “rattling” noise was what made me look up in the air.

      I also learned, they are not dangerous to go near, but people are not encouraged to feed them as they will peck you to ask for food. They are not afraid of humans and a former co-worker lives in a rural area and has birdfeeders. The Cranes come by and tilt the birdfeeders and knock seeds onto the ground. Our large Metroparks forbid feeding any of the wildlife, even the squirrels, as it encourages them to become dependent on humans and causes them to rush toward any human, not being able to recognize their benefactor(s) . They were just grazing, so I was not worried to be by them. It was a great experience!

      Like

  15. Ally Bean says:

    Talk about strutting your stuff!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Sweet pics, Linda! Be careful (about humans) when you are out shooting.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Tom! What a treat to see these huge and unique-looking birds. Funny you mention the humans, because my next post, this coming Monday, deals with my concern about being inside a wooded area. Working in the big City (Detroit) taught me to be wary about my surroundings at all times.

      Like

  17. I’ve never seen this bird before! Interesting features.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      A first for me too Esther, though I’ve seen them in pictures. Sandhill Cranes have been around for two million years! A few years ago, a woman photographer I follow on Twitter discovered a Sandhill Crane pair and their chick (a/k/a a “colt”) and they had adopted a Canada Goose gosling. It appeared to her the goose egg hatched the same time as the crane egg, so they nurtured the gosling like their own. I looked forward to her pictures every day of the two playing and growing up together. The gosling was just learning to fly and was found dead by a tree. The woman suspected some foul play and all of her followers, me included, were devastated to hear of the young goose’s demise. Up to then her pictures and the story was featured on social media, not just locally but nationally as well.

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  18. I just love these birds and great pictures Linda. Is it unusual for them to be in Michigan?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Diane! It was a first sighting for me, but they are in Michigan, but in the counties more rural and north of me. I am Facebook friends with a former co-worker and she puts out a birdfeeder and has taken pictures of the Sandhill Cranes tipping the birdfeeder with their long bills and eating the birdseed off the ground (which surprised me how they could do that with such a long bill?)

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  19. Amazing creatures! Mother Nature is an artist with quite an imagination, isn’t she?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Mother Nature sure is amazing sometimes Janis. They were amazing creatures, so tall and yet graceful (after their less-graceful landing). Whenever I see photos of Sandhill Cranes, people always try to capture the image of their feather bustle and red heart on their face, so I was happy to be able to do so too.

      Like

  20. J P says:

    I am still loving the cranes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I knew you would like this post JP since you liked the Monday post which was just a preview of those cranes. Since it was the first (and maybe the last) time to see them, I had to showcase how beautiful they were and give them their own post.

      Like

  21. Very handsome birds! I especially like the headshots highlighting those curious eyes and the striking patch of red.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – they were so unique to see and watch. I wanted to get the headshots to hone in on the interesting red heart which is so striking. They were not skittish in the least, though I remained across the vehicle road from them. I was happy to see no cars (only because the pool and concession stand were closed I’m sure) and no other people to distract them.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. bekitschig says:

    Falls in the categorie of non-scarry birds 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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