The last school bell ‘til Fall rang today …

SASSY MAMA HEADER

 

… and the kids let out a collective cheer – the parents not so much, especially the moms.  I remember how good it felt on that last day of school, knowing that ten weeks stretched before you, with no class, no homework or tests.  I’d be ecstatic, even if it meant I had those pesky Summertime chores to do, like pull weeds, or help out inside.

I suspect there will be more kids at Council Point Park now every morning, some tagging along with their moms to walk the trail by their side, or perhaps to use the playground equipment there.

I wish I could encourage those kids not to just walk along aimlessly on the trail, or enjoy a few quick trips down the slide, because there is so much more to experience if you just take a few minutes each day to stop and look around you.

This past Wednesday morning, the clock alarm buzzed and so I trudged out to the kitchen to turn it off.  I can’t have the alarm at the bedside as it makes its incessant noise, then I turn it off and go back into dreamland.  So, instead I have two alarms, with the obnoxious-sounding one sitting on the kitchen table.  Just as I do, 365 days a year, I turned on the kitchen light, turned off the alarm clock, then went to the kitchen sink to fill up the kettle to make a cup of instant coffee.  On Wednesday morning, there were little ants running everywhere in the stainless steel sink and along the countertop.  They were sure more animated than I was!  The CFL bulb in the kitchen was still dim as it takes a few minutes to totally warm up and work properly, so in my still sleepy stupor, those little bodies darting over the stainless steel sink area, left me momentarily mystified.

Then I knew – oh my goodness, the baby ants were back!

I had a mess of baby ants a couple of years ago when I still had my canary Buddy, and was terrified one would walk across the countertop and into his cage and bite him.  We both survived, but then, just like now, the countertop had several low paper plates filled with cornmeal.  This is for the ants to feast on, since it eventually kills them as they can’t digest it properly.

Yes, I love all creatures, but I draw the line at creepy crawlies that have more legs than I do and run faster than me.

So, as I walked to the Park on Wednesday morning, I was thinking that the kitchen would look like an ant farm run amok by the time I returned, and I was not in the mood to be swiveling my head toward the sink all day as ants skittered along the counter tops here, there and everywhere.

But, once down at the Park, I momentarily forgot my ant issues and started out on the trail – after all, there were steps to walk, goslings to gawk at, hungry squirrels to feed, and … pictures to be taken if something interesting crossed my path, like Mama squirrel who, as you see in the header photo, looked at me indignantly when I tried to offer her peanuts instead of her mud-covered walnut she insisted on gnawing on.

Once again, in the still of the morning, I heard the belly flops of large fish in the Ecorse Creek which runs parallel to the walking trail.  That phenomenon had been happening for a few days already.  The big splashes and churning of the water seemed likely because it’s spawning season.  I saw a few fish leap out of the water, then come down hard in a belly flop.   Here’s the aftermath of one exuberant fish flop near the pond lilies.

BELLY FLOP

I stood poised with the camera, but those flopping fish either went downstream, or to another location, so I was left standing there waiting on them.  I remembered the fish flopping happened a few years ago and a fellow walker told me it was Asian carp that had found their way into our tiny Creek from the River.

But the water was not the only happenin’ place on Wednesday.

Recently I wrote a post about admiring the Painted Turtles on the partially submerged log at the Creek.  I can barely see them from the trail and must peep through the leaves to watch them and/or take their picture.  Other walkers have told me they’ve seen Painted Turtles ambling along the pathway, just taking their time, as turtles are inclined to do.  So, on the second loop, which is usually devoid of interesting critters, ahead of me on the path, was a Painted Turtle.

Since he didn’t run all over the place like the squirrels, taking his photo was pretty easy.

SMALL TURTLE1

His shell was still glossy and damp, so he likely was on a brief foray to land, maybe for a change of scenery, eventually to return to the Creek.

 

SMALL TURTLE2

I was bent over, checking him out, when fellow walkers, Janet and John, called to me across the walking loop:  “hey Linda, did you see the big turtle on the hill?”  “Nope” I answered them, and we started a back-and-forth conversation about it.  Meanwhile this small turtle scuttled away, thus thwarting any more photo ops.

SMALL TURTLE3.jpg

I crossed over to their side of the walking loop to get more info.  Janet described where it was, and I had just walked past the darn thing, but admittedly, while walking, I do occasionally have to scan the upcoming pathway for goose poop and cracks in the asphalt.

I thanked them and quickly retraced my steps.  By the time I arrived, a small crowd was encircling this large turtle.  Unlike the other turtle, this one’s shell was quite dry and dusty looking and it had been out of the water so long that it had bird droppings on the top of its shell.

So, I stood there, alongside the other walkers and moms pushing strollers, as we watched this turtle using its front and back legs to vigorously dig a deep hole in the grassy slope.  Never mind that we looked like a group of voyeurs, hoping to catch a glimpse of her laying her eggs; instead, we were all mesmerized by this glimpse into such a natural phenomenon.  We all stood watching her every move for a good twenty-five minutes, many of us contributing tidbits of information we had gleaned through the years on how turtles lay eggs, and then the hatchlings will break out of their shells in a race to submerge themselves in water.

Of course I took some photos, even if her shell was festooned with bird poop.  I wanted to share what I saw, that being her massive rear legs kicking the dirt away, and Mama Turtle, having moistened that earth, pounding it down further to ensure the muddy hole would safely accommodate all the eggs once they were laid.

FIRST

SECOND.jpg

THIRD

[Note:  I discovered this big turtle was a Snapping Turtle, and not a Painted Turtle, as originally thought.]  When I was online later that day, I made it a point to check out some information on the nesting habits of both Painted Turtles and Snapping Turtles

Approximately 80-90 days later, the hatchlings emerge and make a beeline for the water.  If you’re interested in seeing a short video, here is one which shows what we were watching, as described above:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyiwCNDsdyM ]

I just knew I had to go back the  next day and see how Mama Turtle covered up the nest and I did just that.  Just as the online articles stated, she camouflaged the hole with loose soil and no one would be any the wiser; after all, it is a Park and this nest area is not near any activity like the soccer field or inline skating area.  But, contrary to the information I read, this nest is only 20 feet from the Creek’s edge.

Here is a photo of the covered-up nest … yes, it is nothing spectacular.  The miracle of life will occur about six or more inches beneath that surface.

FINISHED RESULT

After nearly a half-hour of watching the turtle digging her hole, it was time to head home and get ready for work.

But, wait … there were more surprises in store for me at the Park.  While the turtles were fascinating, yesterday I was on the pathway and heard another fish flopping in the Creek.  It happened twice in one minute, so I strayed over to the water’s edge, and suddenly, out of the corner of my eye, I saw something large move in the black raspberry bush beside me.  I jumped back as it startled me.  My sudden presence brought this woodchuck out of its nirvana of noshing on black raspberries.

BLACK RASPBERRIES.jpg

We had a quick staring match …

STARING MATCH

… then it reluctantly hightailed it out of the berry bush …

WOODCHUCK.jpg

… and waddled over to the Creek’s edge.

I saw the elusive heron who was preening itself on the cement precipice … that is, until it saw me and bolted.

There are a world of wonders in my favorite nature nook.  I hope kids will develop the same fascination as I had many decades ago, when I dipped an empty Red Rose pickle jar into the Creek in the meadow at the end of my street and brought home tadpoles for temporary pets.

And now I’ll close this scholarly post, with a quote from a brilliant mind:

“Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”

~ Albert Einstein

 

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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44 Responses to The last school bell ‘til Fall rang today …

  1. Wouldn’t it be great if you (and your camera) were there when the baby turtles started to hatch! Good luck with your ant problem, I have never heard of using corn meal.

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      I would really like than Janis and I am going to count the 72 days and be on the lookout for them racing toward the Creek. Those ants last time were around about two weeks and I looked in my blog post as I wrote about it and it was mid-May, but we are about a month behind in everything this year due to our cold Spring. We had snow in April and the leaves didn’t come out til late May. So, the ants are behind as well.

      The ants eat the cornmeal and then seek a water source and when they drink the water the corn meal expands and makes them explode. Yikes! But I’ve not seen one ant in the cornmeal yet. The ant activity dies down later in the day. I am horrified and angry as well – last year I had a whole-house insulation job done and was told I’d never have another bug in the house as they used some type of cellulose product which had a natural bug repellent. I was happy to have this added “bonus” to the insulation which I got as it was so cold in the house in the Winter and all my kitchen cupboards were so warm, I had to take any food out all Summer. In Winter the same cupboards were ice cold. The insulation was not so great either – it is warmish in here right now and we had a rare beautiful day – 75 degrees and very low humidity. Sunday we will have 95 degrees, with a “real feel” of 100 degrees.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. “Since he didn’t run all over the place like the squirrels, taking his photo was pretty easy.” hahahaha that was pretty funny 🙂
    Back in 2006 some cyclists and I rescued 2 turtles that were lost along the highway, a solitary one in San Diego CA. We were pedaling when suddenly we saw two big slowly-moving “things” in the middle of the road. Thank goodness there were no cars behind us so we stopped and put the 2 turtles way in the forestry area were there were more turtles. It was like these two precious animals were trying to make it across the road for who know what reason and they got lost, maybe? Well, they were saved and hopefully they never tried to do it again.
    We felt better and continued our cycling training.

    When I saw the black raspberry photo I wanted to tell you that I have two plants: Bristol Blackberry bushes. The fruit is so sweet and they are going to town fruiting now.

    “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”
    ~ Albert Einstein ——– So true!🍒🍓🌲🌳🍇🍅🌷🌼

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Good for you Martha helping those poor turtles along. They move so slowly and so often I worry about people getting impatient and not waiting for animals to cross the road, whether it is geese or wild turkeys (we often have geese or wild turkeys suddenly appear on a busy street and hold up traffic as they meander across the street).

      I have since found out from another blogger that the female turtle digging the hole was a Snapping Turtle. I never knew we had Snapping Turtles at this Park and Creek and we stayed a piece away from her so not to bother her or distract her. I will amend my post later.

      There are two women who pick the black raspberries righto off the tree. I say tree because they are so large (there are two different ones) that they have morphed from being a bush to a large woody tree. I wrote a post about them last year after they were there many times when I passed. They just eat them right off the bush. Here is the post and you can see how big the bush is:
      https://lindaschaubblog.net/2017/07/15/pickin-and-grinnin/

      I will soon be seeing posts of you serving exotic dishes using those Bristol Blackberries.

      I love that quote too – I wish more kids were interested in nature … we have public service announcements that run on the radio all the time for “Discover the Forest” (discovertheforest.org) and in them, the kids are discovering things in nature – redwood trees, frogs croaking which make them one with nature.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ann Marie stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………I was fascinated by your blog today with the close up picture of the squirrel eating and the painted turtles………………and of course the story of how and surprisingly turtles lay their eggs ………………….and I love Mr. Albert Einstein’s quote about nature

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I am glad you enjoyed it Ann Marie – I was pretty excited to see both the turtles, and have since found out from another blogger (the one I told you about who has two parrots) that the turtle laying the eggs was a Snapping Turtle, not a Painted Turtle. So, more eggs laid, more baby turtles. I would love to see them scurrying to the water and leaving their nests, but chances of that are likely slim to none, but I will start watching closely – the incubation period is around the same (72 days). I wonder if there are any turtles at your pond? I’m thinking not because it is a manmade pond, and not a natural area? I wish you could have seen this Ann Marie. That squirrel gave me such a defiant look, like she was mad I had tried to give her peanuts instead of that walnut she had just dug out of the ground. Made me smile. I like that quote as well. It fit perfectly for this post about school and discovering nature.

      Like

  4. susieshy45 says:

    Linda,
    Have you read Enid Blyton as a child ? She used to write nature stories but for children and they all had nature lessons in them- descriptions of birds and plants and trees and squirrels and walnuts and acorns and everything. I was reminded of her stories when I read your post. I loved it.
    I am not sure why but children these days seem bored of everything. They all seem grumpy and frowny or is that just me seeing them like that. I see them mostly in the malls so perhaps the restrictions of mall walking tell on them. If we could get kids out into nature, would they all learn to appreciate her ? And not harm her ?
    I have ant problems too- fortunately they are not biting and they are resistant to almost everything except water. I hate killing them but they are in the way of everything. Did you see the ants when you got back from your walk ?
    I want to see the baby tortoises coming out of their mud house if you could. What wonderful experiences you have on your walks, Linda.
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Susie: No, I never read Enid Blyton as a child, but I used to watch a lot of animal and nature programs when I was a child. My parents would watch the “National Geographic” specials and wildlife specials they had on and something called “Animal Kingdom” and there were lots of stories about animals in their natural settings, and those great animal movies by Disney (“Old Yeller”, “The Red Pony”, “The Incredible Journey”, “Rascal” all come to mind). When I was older my parents bought me the James Herriot series of animal stories and I think there was a movie or made-for-TV movie for him too. Have you read him at all Susie? He was a British veterinarian and worked in a little town, so he was like a country vet for big animals. I loved his stories. Here is a write-up from Wikipedia and it details his works: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Herriot

      I have now found out that it was a Snapping Turtle that was digging the hole, so I will be amending the post later. Same incubation period, but more hatchlings so I hope I could be lucky enough to see them coming out of this muddy hole and heading for the water. If I do, I will be sure to take pictures of it Susie and share here. I do love my walks, not just the peace of the Park and the benefit of the exercise, but also little treats like the turtle and even the woodchuck. Usually as soon as he sees someone, he runs into his burrow and disappears!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. The woodchuck is a new mammal for me never heard of one before so had a “google”. We do not have turtles in UK your views were something we could just not see here apart from a zoo.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Andy – We have woodchucks in a wooded area that is near the water, but not in our neighborhoods. This Park is right in the middle of a residential area but the Creek runs through the Park. People use the term “woodchuck” and “groundhog” interchangeably. I see them at the Park all the time, but usually as soon as they see someone coming, they run for their burrow. Their burrows are quite deep and many tunnels that branch out under the ground, so they can disappear in a matter of seconds, and will peek out to ensure it is safe to come out again. Sometimes you only see their head looking out of the burrow. I have only seen them on land, never in the water and never in a tree. This raspberry bush (it is now large enough I’d call it a tree) was full of berries and I guess they lured him up there as he was happily munching away. I looked for him today and he was not around. The turtles are usually in the Creek and it was a rare sighting for me to see them out of their element. A fellow blogger has now commented that the turtle digging the hole for her eggs is a Snapping Turtle, not a Painted Turtle, so I will need to amend this post. I did not get close enough to see her face as we stood back from her apiece. So, the incubation period is the same, but the eggs will be the size of ping pong balls and many more of them. I hope I am lucky enough to see them hatching and coming out of the nest.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. That second turtle is a Snapping Turtle. The big ones can easily snap your fingers off like butter. If they bite your foot or something similar they will not let go. They have a dangly worm-like projection by their tongue that lures fish close enough to chomp. They can be hypnotized by gently rubbing the front side/edge of their shell with a long metal file… and i mean a very long file! … unless you want to offer them a finger sandwich. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks for clarifying that Tom – I will amend my post later as I don’t want to do it while someone might be reading it. I have just looked at the incubation period which is similar, but the amount of eggs is different and not the size of a chicken egg, but instead like ping pong balls. I did not see the female turtle’s face up close (we all stood away a few paces, so not to disturb her), so I would not have noticed she had no yellow stripes nor red cheeks like a Painted Turtle. It was interesting watching her … she was on a mission to get that hole dug and those eggs laid. I had no idea the turtles got that big at this Creek. The ones I see sunning themselves on the partially submerged log are certainly not that large.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Snapping Turtles have been kept as pets in the UK and I have read they have been issues where these non-native species have been released into our environment when they have got too large.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I didn’t know that Andy – I wonder if they do that here as well? I had a turtle when I was growing up – it seems everyone around here had one when you were a kid/pre-teen, just a small painted turtle and you had a flat bowl with a walkway that they could sit out of the water but not escape the bowl. His name was Murtle. The blogger that corrected me on the species of turtle said they could take your finger off if you got too close. We were being respectful of that turtle and what she was doing and didn’t venture too close. I will still be on the lookout for baby turtles – same incubation period, but more hatchlings. I wonder what the odds are of being there at the same time they hatch?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Snapping Turtles don’t sun themselves like Painted Turtles do. They are totally aquatic. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I wasn’t even aware there were Snapping Turtles there, let alone in Michigan. I thought we only had Painted Turtles. That turtle was pretty large. I will have to Google how long they can stay out of the water … her shell was dry and dusty.

        Like

  7. Rebecca says:

    How exciting to see the turtle laying her eggs! I’d love to see that once. I’ve also never seen a woodchuck. I’d call this a very rewarding walk!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, it was Rebecca. I have now found out that the turtle that laid the eggs was a snapping turtle. A fellow blogger read my post and informed me that. I know it was a bigger turtle than the first one, and a dull-looking shell, but it had been out of the water for some time, so its shell was dry and also dusty from flinging mud. I will need to amend my post later. The incubation period is around the same time – I will be on the lookout for babies!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. John says:

    Wow! That photo of the squirrel is one of the best I have seen! I will hug it when I see it.😊 The turtle, is they living in the wild?

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks John – she posed very nicely and looked so indignant when I threw her the peanuts, so she could drop the walnut which she had just dug up from the ground and the shell was all covered in dirt. The look on her face was like “leave me alone and let me eat my walnut in peace!” The turtles do live in the wild, and they are the ones I see on the log sunning themselves. This hill she dug to lay the eggs was about 20 feet from the banks of the Creek. I have now discovered it was a snapping turtle, not a painted turtle. Another blogger told me this. The first smaller one crossing the path was a painted turtle – you see its yellow stripes and red cheeks and glossy shell. This second turtle was dusty and dirty from digging the hole and much bigger … I did not know we had snapping turtles there. I’ve only seen the smaller ones. I would love to be there when they hatch and come running out to find water all at once. And the woodchuck I usually see at a distance popping into his burrow and he was eating berries from this big bush/tree.

      Liked by 1 person

      • John says:

        What do the turtles do in the winter? Is they in a zoo or? What I understan it can be very cold in Michigan. If the turtles manage the winter there, they can manage the winter here in Sweden. Michigan are more south then the country Sweden, an I live in south of Sweden, called Skåne in Swedish, Scania in English. The city is Kristianstad.
        Here is map you can compare.😊 Sweden is if you scroll right.
        https://www.google.se/maps/search/sverige+michigan/@50.1598641,-67.4494795,3z/data=!3m1!4b1

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Wow, that was an interesting tour of both places. I have not even heard of some of the places in Michigan (I’ve lived here for 52 years for goodness sake – I need to explore more). I did not realize there were so many lakes and water for Sweden – no wonder you have so many opportunities to see water birds. I don’t see why turtles would not survive in Sweden. They go dormant in the Winter and burrow deep into the silt or dirt at the bottom of the Creek and they remain dormant until the weather gets warmer. In fact, I found it interesting that these turtle hatchlings, if it is not warm enough during this 72-day period of incubation, they will stay in the nest (I assume in their shell) until next Spring in the ground. That just fascinates me. P.S. – that map was interesting. I know you made a comparison before when it was still Winter and I assumed you just looked at both countries/state.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I was sure I commented on this post, because I read every word. Hmmm. I hope I lost just the comment, not my mind.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      No, but you “liked” it Anne … I just checked my SPAM filter and nothing in there. I didn’t dwell on the squirrel much, more on the turtles and woodchucks. That squirrel just had such an indignant look like “what do you want – I see your peanuts there, I want to eat this walnut!” How is your birdbath solar fountain working? Are the birds still loving it as much as the beginning?

      Like

      • Oh, I’m glad I liked it, even if I didn’t comment the first time around. The solar fountain is working well. I dump out the water and check the pump every couple of days so that it won’t get clogged. The birds come often to drink. I was wondering if any of them would hop on the fountain, but I’ve not seen that. They would get a fright if they did, since I’m sure it would tip.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’m glad they are enjoying it and giving you some entertainment as well. Marge got a kick out of hers as it would surprise the birds sometimes when suddenly it would go high, then higher and higher and it would surprise them sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I know you’ll be watching for baby turtles to come scampering out Linda!
    your a true nature photographer!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I will be Wayne – you are so right. And I hope it happens when I am there at my usual time and not one hot and sunny afternoon or overnight. I will be sure and post pictures. I am disappointed I never got to see the swans and their cygnets. One of the walkers at Council Point Park goes to the River to chat with the fisherman and was watching for swans and their cygnets but never saw any this year. I missed going as it rained every weekend.

      Like

  11. Ellie P. says:

    Argh! One year I had “ant issues” here in my apartment…on the 14th (really 13th!) floor! Silly naive me, I had thought there wouldn’t be insects up this high. I had a lot to learn, huh? Anyway, they were called “pharaoh” ants, and I told the superintendent about them. He told the landlord, and was able to bring in a proper exterminator who put out bait for the ants. The idea was that they’d bring the bait back to their nest(s) and eventually they’d all be, um, poisoned. Sounds harsh but hey, we don’t want ants in our homes. They can stay outside, thank you veddy much! Which they finally did. Whew!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I guess ants are better than termites or cockroaches, but still … yesterday I was sitting here and all of a sudden there were flying ants, small ones, but landing on the table, no doubt attracted to the light over my head and/or the goose-neck lamp by my computer. I can’t tell you how many I squished. Today, I probably killed four or five thankfully and tomorrow I hope it is none. I Googled to read up on them, and apparently they have some mating thing that happens in a 24-hour period (and can stretch to a two-week period) … they mate and then their wings fall off and they return to their colonies. I’m with you – I’m not a bug lover, inside nor outside to be honest. If they were spiders, I’d have to leave!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ellie P. says:

        Acckkk! I’m the worst! I won’t even go out on my balcony cuz of the spiders. And later, the (shudder) wasps! Got stung twice and it KILLS!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Ellie – I’ve never been stung by a bee or a wasp but I am petrified of spiders and centipedes and I could never sit on outside furniture now for fear one might crawl up on me. (Never mind that I went to open-air pavilion concerts back in the day and sat on the grass … I guess my fear then was not as bad back then.)

        I have a centipede under a plastic dish and he has been trapped there for five weeks. He is still alive. I am afraid to move the dish in case he escapes and I am sure he is very angry at me. Today, no flying ants … I am happy they met their match and are living happily ever after off the ranch, er … my kitchen area.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ellie P. says:

        How could he still be alive after five weeks? If he hasn’t had anything to ea- Waiitaminute! I’ll bet he sneaks out from under the dish at night and goes to visit you in your sleep, and then off to the kitchen for whatever it is that centipedes eat! Then in the morning he returns to his cruel crypt.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I am laughing at you … yes it is a cruel crypt but at least he is contained in there and I know his whereabouts!

        I was going to write a blog post about it for Tuesday Musings and thought people would think I was crazy. (Or a messy housekeeper to tolerate his presence.) I went into the bathroom 5 weeks ago today – this centipede that was big enough to go to work was sitting on my soap in the soap dish. I was disgusted and went to the kitchen and found an old clear plastic bowl and put it over the soap dish and him. I took a photo first … always the “reporter” you know. It was disgusting. I thought he would die in a few days … according to Wikipedia, centipedes need water or will die. I’m not slipping him any water – he is at the other end of my vanity. I shudder when I see him in there sometimes – he is alive all right.

        Like

      • Ellie P. says:

        Ugh. 😬😂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Indeed! I have some pics of him before and after … I have almost relented as time goes on, but I’ve already divulged about the ants and now the flying ants, and my less-than-stellar housekeeping skills, so I guess I will keep that story to myself and not write about it for many eyes to see. Every so often I flick my nail against the plastic … it makes him crazy. Makes me crazy that he is still there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ellie P. says:

        😬😬😬

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Talk about a “buzz kill” … literally!

        Liked by 1 person

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