Baby boom at Council Point Park.

There are a few things you can count on every Spring … the appearance of allergies, dandelions and those pesky elm and maple seeds that land in your mulch and sprout into a gazillion tiny weeds in a day or two.

Spring is also the time for babies at all the parks and woodsy areas and Council Point Park is no exception.  I’ve never seen baby squirrels, but I am not alone in that regard, because, unlike the waterfowl who hatch, then head to the water within 24 hours of birth, baby squirrels stay in the nest, totally dependent on Mom for the first ten weeks of life.  After they have been weaned, squirrels are off to explore the world, forage and plead for peanuts, which I wonder if that is an innate trait, or something their folks taught them to do.

So, you’ll not see any squirrel photos in this post, but no worries, I’ve got a few cute pictures tucked away for later.

The Robin nursery is busy.

Since I wrote about Mama Robin sitting on the nest and incubating those pretty turquoise eggs, a trio of baby robins has hatched. 

The hatchlings are growing big and I am amused that their mouths seem to be large in proportion to their bodies.  They have an almost sinister grin, though they remind me a little of Daffy Duck with that oversized beak.  Most of the time, those beaks are open and pointed toward the sky as they await Mama to drop some grubs or worms in that gaping mouth.   

Mama Robin continues to sit on top of the chicks when she is not feeding them and sometimes her mate watches them nearby while she is off looking for toddler tidbits.

Harry the Heron has offspring too.

My favorite nature nook has been gifted with the presence of a baby Great Blue Heron.  Fellow walker Mike told me a few weeks ago that he saw a heron family on the cement landing.  I was sorry I missed that sight.  I had not seen Harry the Heron in ages, not that it does me any good, since he sees me and makes a horrible screeching noise and takes flight before I can take his picture.  Harry is either camera-shy, or just has incredibly bad manners to bolt like that, but I do not take it personally. 

So, whether or not this was Harry’s kin, I don’t know, but this small heron was standing on the cement landing and I was able to get quite close to him.  He was not uncomfortable, didn’t mind my intrusion and just continued his ramrod stance, peering into the water, studying it for movement of any fish for his breakfast, just like his folks taught him to do.

Then he bent down closer, studying the water, ignoring the rumbles in his stomach, while hoping for a little fish. 

He began to hunker down, ready to aim for the kill …

… but no luck so far. He did strike a beautiful pose while fishing though.

I was hoping he’d get that elusive fish, so I could get a picture of that shad that he’d gulp down whole, then it would wiggle all the way down that slender neck enroute to his stomache.  I kept the camera clapped up tight against my face.  But, either the fish weren’t around, or this heron must hone his hunting skills … there were no fish for his breakfast and ten minutes later I glanced at my watch and decided since it was a work day, I’d better hustle, so I said “see ya soon okay?”

There were lots of loosey-goosies.

There are now three Canada Geese families at Council Point Park and that is the same as in recent years.  Two families have rather large goslings, already shedding their downy yellow fuzz for a mottled, gray-and-yellow sleeker look.  Along with their advanced age, comes a whole lot of attitude as you’ll see below.  In one family, those goslings are still fairly small. 

I was dividing my time between the three families, trying to get some pictures where they weren’t in the shadows, or preening, or munching grass that was almost as tall as they were, especially when they laid down. 

I got some random photos of each family as you will see below.

Then, I was bending down to feed a squirrel and almost missed the kerfuffle between a few Canada Geese.  As you see below, one of them had his knickers in a twist about something and he started honking and hissing at Mama and Papa Goose who had their goslings gathered around them.  The pictures are a little fuzzy as I was in the shadow of a tree when all the action began and I didn’t want to step away from my place in the “cheap seats” to get a better view.

Well, Papa Goose was defending his family and thus he countered with a little hissing of his own, so the bully goose flapped his wings, then went airborne just a little and Papa Goose took off after him.  I had the camera handy and captured the fracas.  I was back a respectable distance and they were not mindful of my presence.  Look at the goslings scatter while flipping their tiny wings.

The funniest thing was that once there were no more wing-flapping shenanigans, the bully goose continued hissing and the goslings, quick learners, began hissing back at this interloper.  It’s kind of like when a Chihuahua barks at a Great Dane! 

And just like that (snapping fingers) the fracas was over and the family gathered together and moved on.

In the coming weeks I hope to capture more images of the babies as they grow by leaps and bounds!

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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64 Responses to Baby boom at Council Point Park.

  1. You babied us. I enjoyed your lovely photos. I hope you don’t get tired of my saying that.

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Aw thanks Anne and very clever. I won’t get tired of you saying that. I was afraid to put too many gosling photos in since I just did all goslings yesterday but I had to include these three families … they are 3 goslings, 4 goslings and 5 goslings respectively. The youngest family are the 3. The fight was incredible and the goslings hissing at the bully had me laughing (quietly … as I didn’t want some gander trying to goose me for laughing at his predicament!)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. susieshy45 says:

    You are funny, Linda. The gosling family are dangerous- imagine hissing and fighting with one of their kind. Also do they actually hurt each other or is it all noise and flapping and chasing? Do you know if they harm humans?
    I am glad the Canadian geese eat grass. I would have thought you would have had to feed them!!
    The pictures of the baby robins are great- their beaks are larger than their bark?
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I see the geese hissing at one another all the time Susie – even one will turn to their mate or companion and start hissing at them for no reason. It is kind of strange but seems to be typical goose behavior to me. But I have never seen a goose attacking another goose like that – I am not sure if it tried to harm the goslings. I am glad I looked up and I was near a tree, so could not get into a better position to see what was going on, nor take a better picture. But I saw the goose chase after him. They will attack a human in a heartbeat, especially if they have goslings nearby or a nest that is nearby and they perceive the human is a threat to them or their offspring. The Canada Geese eat grass and once their goslings are raised and can fly, the Park sprays something on the grass so they won’t return for a while. Many people don’t like them on the perimeter path because they are ornery and poop a lot and this is a harmless substance and done around the time they lose their flight feathers anyway and can’t fly. So they go to a larger park where there is water (to hide from any predators since they can’t fly). The robins were cute too and their mouths are three times as big as their bodies!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I used to love the Blue Heron until I spotted one at my little ponds eating my fish! Now I have a net over them. Gorgeous photo’s Linda!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. AJ says:

    Those little breaks are so cute!!! I hate it when geese hiss at me!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I know … they were hissing at the big goose and it was really funny, just mimicking their parents or the other geese, although there were other geese that were grazing nearby and they raised their heads to watch the fight, then just went back to eating again.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Maybe a fish next time. Great shots even without a fish.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hopefully for his sake Andy. Thank you – he was not intimidated by me in the least, and I got a few shots, then kept getting closer and closer.
      He still didn’t move so he was either not scared of me or really intent on getting that fish!

      Like

  6. Ally Bean says:

    These photos are wonderful. I admire your patience and your eye for taking them. I love the little baby robin beaks pointed upward, waiting for that worm.

    Liked by 3 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Ally – I bought a DSLR last year right around this time and I have been trying to use it more, but just on automatic and I’d like to learn how to use it in manual mode. I admire Shelley’s photos – she has taken the time to learn all facets of the camera. I’m dedicating a portion of this crummy weather long holiday for hunkering down to learn more too. For everyday, since I don’t own a smartphone, I have my digital compact with 12X zoom and I love it for the ease and convenience but for the past Saturday and Sunday posts, I used the bigger camera and could really hone in on those babies. Seeing their faces and upturned beaks up close is pretty amazing and they stay like that all the time, even when Mom was not close by. I should have called this post “Great Expectations” perhaps?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Ally Bean says:

        linda, I’d like to get a DSLR camera, too. I’d only do so if I had the time to learn how to use it. I wonder how your photos will improve/change as you become more accustomed to shooting with yours. “Great Expectations” would have been a cute title for this post, but titles come and go while cute photos of baby birds are timeless.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’m hoping to improve Ally, but I’ll tell you that back in the late 70s/early 80s I traveled a lot. So I bought a Canon AE-1 35 mm camera. The AE-1 was supposed to be the easiest to use on automatic. I even took a photography class, but all we learned was composition, not much re: adjustments. I never used that camera in manual mode. Before I bought the camera, I researched as I wanted an easy transition from compact to DSLR, and I preferred Canon as I’ve always found them to be a workhorse (just like HP for computers, as to me anyway). So the Canon EOS Rebel T6 was recommended as the easiest camera to transition from smartphone or compact digital. I got a deal on it for a Father’s Day promotion. They now have a mirrorless Canon (very pricey though) which is faster and more like a DSLR without using interchangeable lenses. That would be even better in my opinion. I figure that I’ll take pictures in both modes but what if you see something on the fly? My luck … I’d get no pic at all – lots of snouts and tails and that’s it. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ally Bean says:

        I’m sure that when you photograph snouts and tails the pics will be awe-inspiring. I look forward to seeing them. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Well thank you for the vote of confidence and I hope I don’t let you down Ally. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Gotta love babies!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The babies are so cute! Isn’t it amazing the moms and dads know exactly what to do… all without reading a childhood development book!

    Liked by 3 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      They sure are Janis. I like watching the baby geese toddling around after their parents. They’ll get behind when they stop to lay down in the grass and rest then one of the parents will turn around and look at them and the gosling will take off running as fast as it can. This is my favorite time of the year at the Park.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Laurie says:

    Oh, yes to the gazillion maple keys sprouting in the mulch! I can’t tell you how many I pulled last week while we were mulching!

    Great photos of all the babies! I love the series featuring the young heron. I hope he learns to catch fish soon.

    Liked by 3 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Laurie – glad you enjoyed the photos. The heron was special because the adult heron(s) all bolt just as soon as you approach them, but this little guy (or girl) was so intent on fishing he paid no attention to me at all. I was a little bummed when I didn’t see the family but this young heron made up for it. When I first started gardening, I did the landscape fabric under the mulch, a painstaking job to be sure, and it never helped. I sure wish someone would have told me that as weeds (likely found in the top soil) still come through the landscape fabric (I used the breathable type). Then I laid the mulch and applied Preen in between layers of mulch … I smugly thought “I’m not going to deal with any weeds and this will make my life easier!” Ha! The maple seeds came down – they’re not as bad as the elm seeds – do you have them fluttering down, the ones that look like eyeballs? Weeds were everywhere, especially if we had a moist and warm late May/June. There must be thousands of them on the ground right now in my yard. Yesterday we had 20 mph when I was walking in the a.m. – I came home covered in them in my clothes and hair. As to the mulch, the old me would pick them out, now I just take a hoe and rumple up the mulch every time I’m outside and it uproots them. That is a lazy gardener.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………………..that is a good title for our blog today………………………………”Baby Boomers”…………………………………I love the close up pics of the Robin and her little ones with the big mouths open……………………………………………..

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      “Baby Boomer” … not just me but what is happening at the Park and all the Parks. Ann Marie, those baby robins sure are cute and they never stop having the wide-open mouths waiting on worms or grubs. It is just amazing to watch them, either with the naked eye, or through the camera lens. The miracle of nature. And they grow so big from day to day – eyes open up and feathers galore.

      Like

  11. Pam Lazos says:

    All the little peeps are peeping! We have lots of baby geese and sheep at the farm behind our house, Linda. It’s lovely to watch, although Apollo is always barking at the sheep, trying to herd them into some kind of formation. :0)

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, I love how they are constantly looking for food Pam. The first few days I saw them after they hatched, their eyes were closed and their beaks were constantly upward waiting on food. A few days later, their eyes were open and when Mama was gone, they’d peer at me over the nest and sometimes with that oversized beak and big eyes, they had an almost sinister appearance. The dog riled up that gander (in my Saturday post) – it got too close to the goslings and the gander terrified the dog when he flapped his wings. Funny with Apollo having herding instincts with the geese – you just gotta love nature sometimes!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Shelley says:

    Excellent photos, Linda! Thanks for the compliment too. Oh, and I adore your narration of what’s happening. And the Donald Duck look-alike made me chuckle! Baby birds at that stage are all beak – not as cute as the goslings! I look forward to what you learn with your camera while the weather permits such shenanigans! 😉 Just kidding – I know you’d rather be out walking!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked these Shelley. I took them last Wednesday. I knew we were having the three sunny mornings in a row so decided to take the big camera – the weekends seem dubious sometimes. Yes, the robins aren’t the cutest newborns or even after a week either, though they finally have peach fuzz on their heads and their feathers are coming in. When I was following that nest of robins last year, I saw just how scrawny-looking they really were and the over-sized beaks reminds me of Silly Putty where you stretch the image horizontally or vertically. And after a few more weeks, the goslings won’t be as cute either. I have pictures from last year where they are gray, and have a long boat-shaped body, and extra-long legs – they’ll start looking a little homely. Then they will be gone by June. The goslings will have fledged by then, and shortly thereafter, their parents start losing their flying feathers, and the family will go to a larger park (like Lake Erie Metropark) which has a long shoreline and they can just go into the water if there are land predators until all their flying feathers grow back.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Mackenzie says:

    Look at those babies!!!! Oh my goodness, what a treat!! Love Harry too- he’s beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Eliza says:

    Those geese are so cute!
    I loved the baby robins, I’ve never seen baby birds before.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      The geese sure are cute and the baby robins look scrawny and have their eyes closed for 5-6 days after birth and then they start getting feathers all over. They are ready to learn to fly and leave the nest at just two weeks old. Their beaks look huge in proportion to their faces and open all the time saying “gimme me food Mama!” They do that even when she’s not there as they can’t see her.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. the best time to get pictures of a Blue Heron is when they are concentrating on catching a fish!
    great shots Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Rebecca says:

    The goslings are growing as are the baby robins! I don’t think the robins will be in that nest much longer. Very nice photos of all the birds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, it is amazing how quickly the robins are growing Rebecca. Yesterday they seemed to be spilling out of the nest … now I’m keeping an eye on them for sitting in the tree next to the nest ready to fledge, like the ones I saw and took pictures of last year. The first sets of goslings are already losing their downy appearance and growing sleeker by the day and are not more of a gray color with huge feet! I have a picture of one goose family monopolizing the pathway, so give the goslings a few more days and they, too, will be hissing at the walkers to get out of their way! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Prior... says:

    this post is so filled with life – the robin’s are my fav..
    and I look forward to seeing the growth of the goslings in upcoming posts

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yvette, it is nature at its finest and both the robins and goslings are growing in leaps and bounds. The robins will soon be ready to fledge (14 days after hatching) as I’ve been monitoring them with their eyes open in the nest for a week today. They open their eyes around five days. So likely when I saw the mom sitting on the nest, she was keeping the hatchlings warm, and not incubating the eggs. I couldn’t tell. Last year the Robin built a nest closer to the ground and I had a great view of the goings-on. This is a wee bit more secluded. The goslings are huge, and when I saw them yesterday, they already have some attitude going on, taking after their parents in their actions when they see us walkers. We sidestep the goslings and their parents and walk on the lawn to avoid getting them all fizzed and agitated. I’ll get more pictures of the goslings to use in a post by week’s end.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Oh how funny that the goslings already have a little attitude –
        And did I tell you we have a bird’s nest in the gutter area above my bedroom? I will have to share more about this later – but o my goodness they have been there forever and I was joking with my spouse that they have to be past fledgling age – are they all plump up there like thirty-year-olds who never leave home….

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, the ganders mimic their parents even at that age. When they started hissing at that bigger goose I just had to laugh. They are pipsqueaks … (I should have used that word in my post … a cute word that I never hear anymore). That is funny about the bird nest. They probably have a good food source so why leave home and strike out on your own?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Oh I have not heard pipsqueaks in a long time too – fun word 💙

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I know – and now I must find an occasion to use it. It kind of popped into my head.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Joni says:

    That was great Linda. Just what I needed after a frustrating week….have run into problems with my kitchen design which need to be worked out before I can sign off. I esp. loved the “toddler tidbits” You do have a way with words!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Joni – glad you enjoyed it. I was starting to worry about you as you’d been MIA for a few days. I thought the kitchen design was later in the month of June … I know lots of running around to make it all come together though. I saw one family yesterday … growing like a weed!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I had six days of reading to catch up on last night, so I skimmed a lot, not your posts though! I always enjoy your posts. I was already to sign off on the quote on Monday, but my neighbour who I brought with me to the showroom on Thurs to help pick out hardware, has an over the range microwave with a vented fume hood. Apparently this is what everyone has now! My design lady never mentioned it to me, although she might have asked me early days if I wanted the microwave off the counter, I said I don’ t think there’s room, but she never mentioned the over the stove option, which not only saves space but has the venting system for fumes underneath it. I saw them when I was looking at fume hoods. So I emailed her whether we could change the plan to accommodate that, and have not heard back as she was away on Friday. She designed a longer cupboard over the stove to hide a long pipe but now I’m thinking that pipe has to come out and/or be shorter. So who does that? A sheet metalist I was told, so that means calling in another trade. Is it done before or after the new ones are in? Can the guy pulling out the old cupboards rip out the pipe? Also I would need an electrical upgrade to that side of the kitchen as there is no outlet for the microwave up there – most of the electricians don’t want those small jobs. I went to one electrician on Friday who has residential expertise – booked up until Sept! Went to two plumbing places to try and find a smaller sink, as the lazy susans in the corners are narrow 7 1/2 inches, finally design lady told me she could extend the one side. The plumber tells me I should upgrade/check my old copper pipes as they might be thin and leak. This cabinet place is not a contractor, it’s up to you to find all the other trades, which is probably why people hire a contractor to subcontract out all this stuff, but then that is all more money. Ran around two days looking a dishwashers etc and picked out cabinet hardware. Looked at sinks and faucets – but there is too much choice – a whole long aisle in Lowe’s of each. Am thinking I will just have the plumber order a sink – it will be cheaper, and I don’t really care about fancy soap dispensers and designer stuff. Everyone you talk to has a different opinion. The quote price for the cabinets was okay, about what I expected, but the other additional expenses are adding up. After it’s signed I need to find a painter. Because I’m so slow in finalizing the plan, it will more likely be installed in August now. I’m even sorry I started into it, hope it all works out…..but as we know it usually doesn’t!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Thank you for reading my posts Joni – I appreciate it. I thought it was odd you had not been on here and I had done a few posts, so I sent you an e-mail yesterday asking if you were okay. I do see you did the post on the tea. I didn’t finish everything in Reader last night – it got late and then I lost my internet earlier tonight. Just momentarily, but the lights kept flickering, but not all over the house, just in my room where this old computer is (it’s missing some keys and the battery died on it long ago but I never unplug my laptop anyway, but the battery died on it, I just use it for pictures – it is a workhorse, soon will be 10 years old). So, I was on here, and the laptop shut off – not good that it did that and when I turned it back on, it wanted to go to safe mode. Got it up and running but no internet. So went and did something else for a while and it came back and it was okay. Our weather was supposed to be stormy most of the day – they were wrong, not that I want it stormy, but we had a storm and it lasted for awhile, but not severe weather which was expected. But we have rain every day with a thunderstorm through Wednesday. I decided to dedicate this day to studying the camera manual to try to learn how to operate it in manual mode. My head is crammed with lots of information which I hope I can remember when I use it, which is usually just on the weekend. I knew the big part of the remodel wasn’t for a while – that was why I wrote. I don’t envy you with all this work and it’s a good thing you got all your outside work done before you embarked on this project. What a hassle if you have to have individual trades in for everything – I’d be tempted to cancel it as well. And imagine that electrician was booked up to September – do you need a master electrician to do those electrical jobs? The company that checks my A/C and furnace does electrical and plumbing jobs – does yours do that too? I’m on a plan for them to come Spring and Fall and with that plan, you get a discount on repairs and parts for not only HVAC but also plumbing and electrical stuff as well. I’ve seen the microwaves over the stove and it looks nice and takes up less room – I have absolutely no counter space here. When we first moved here, it bothered my mom immensely as she had more counter space in Oakville so she kept most of her pots and pans stored in the bottom drawer of the oven or in the oven itself, so that was an issue as you had to find a place to put them. There are very few cupboards here. She wanted a butcher block, not for chopping, but just so she could put a toaster oven on there (she used it as it was easier than bending over which was difficult for her and thus she could store stuff in the oven) and it has two deep shelves for some storage.

        Like

      • Joni says:

        I seldom go into my gmail account to read my mail, maybe every couple of weeks, but thanks for checking on me! That’s weird, our lights flickered momentarily here too tonight, but didn’t go out, and it wasn’t even raining, although it rained earlier. Next week is rain EVERY single day. I don’t like the humidity, very unpleasant to be out in it. I have a Reliance home plan for fixing heating, cooling and plumbing for $50/month, but they don’t include reno stuff. A few people have given me names of electricians and painters which I will start to call next week. My design lady emailed me that she thinks the Over the Counter Range is a good idea, so she is altering the plans, so I might possibly be able to sign off on Monday. Then I’ll have 6 weeks to line up the rest of the stuff, and it won’t be as hectic…..so I’m feeling better about it tonight. I was just overtired last night – too much running around last week. I keep my pots and pan in the bottom of my oven too, but then I don’t have that many as I don’t cook that much! After twelve, I’d better go to bed. I hope your Memorial Day weekend has some sun!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I have a G-mail account too but that was only because my Comcast e-mail fizzles out every so often – I can’t get in there, it spins around and around. I’ve never configured my e-mail to Windows e-mail, just left it web-based. Our weather is the same next week … rain and/or storms every day and I’m trying to keep it in perspective that it could be as bad as what is going on in Oklahoma or Missouri – just scary. That sounds promising that everything will go more smoothly for you … I can understand your frustration. I finally put the A/C on this a.m. as it was 77 degrees and 70 humidity in the house. We have a storm later today and Memorial Day will be good til late in the day.

        Liked by 1 person

  19. Oh so sweet. I love your Harry the
    Heron update and the little Robin ones. Spring is such a beautiful time of year for nature ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you like it Zena. I had hoped to get another post to include the Robins just before they fledged, but they have already fledged and not stayed near that tree. Maybe they’ll show up as juveniles – I hopeso. I got some cute juvenile pictures last Spring …. 🙂

      Like

  20. Pril says:

    What a wonderful photo of that heron. sorry to be all nosy but if you have a DSLR camera i might have some websites (once i find them that i’d like to share with you) in efforts to learn more about the manual mode. best to just use it all the time! That’s my big camera.. Is my DSLR. i love to shoot with it.
    I’m digging your post as well as your photos i love the correlation between the hissing birds with the dogs! very nicely done!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked it Pril – I am trying to use it more – it is so easy just to tote along the digital compact with me every day on my walk, so I am trying to use it more on the weekend and I have to learn how to shoot on manual mode, not automatic, so I’ve been trying to do that as well. I watched one series of “how-tos” by a photographer named Jared Polin. He had a series of videos, maybe 12 or 15 and he sends you one a day and they concentrate on just one topic at a time.

      Like

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