Small Fall.

The early morning drizzle vanished on cue and the faint sun put a smile on my face and a little pep in my step. A gusty breeze stirred my straw, er … hair.

I’m doing a slow meander through this first week of Fall. It’s still warm here in Southeast Michigan and feels like this season should have the moniker of “Small Fall” – just a silly thought I guess. The pumpkins adorning homeowners’ porches had better be fake, otherwise they’ll resemble Libby’s canned pumpkin after our mini heat wave. This week is designated as “Michigan Trails Week” but since it’s kind of soggy the next few days, I’ll likely stay local and just pop down to Council Point Park to commemorate the event.

Meanwhile, at that Park, the first blush of Fall has arrived, with subtle changes that make you say “whoa – it looks like Mother Nature took out her Sharpie to add a few colors to the landscape.” 

There are glimpses of the usual jewel-toned leaves, or oddities like this tree with the polka-dotted leaves … whatever disease it has, these spots emerge every year right as rain. 

Late September dribs and drabs.

This is the Park’s first big tree to show a little color, though many reeds and bushes already have dribs and drabs of vibrant reds, deep plum or orangey-brown tones.  I noticed the walker’s sweater exactly color coordinated with this tree.

I wondered why this one stem of leaves is totally red and none of the others are?

Mother Nature was a little haphazard where she put her splashes and dashes of color … for example:

This was a bit sad … a Cabbage White butterfly caught on a burr, forever hovering on top of this prickly plant, its wings snagged and trapped on the rough edges.

The hangers on.

As we near the end of September, our weather still feels more like August and the tinges of wildflower colors make you forget we’re almost through the first week of Fall.  As mentioned earlier this week, some dandelions are still dotting the landscape.  I have the occasional one in my lawn too – their tenacity is admirable, but they can take a hike anytime.  

I noticed this metal yard ornament … it makes no difference if we pass Go, skip Fall and proceed right to Winter – this crazy daisy will still be doing its best to brighten up this homeowner’s front yard.

Are you pining for the upcoming Christmas holidays yet?

Pine trees and pine cones make me think of Christmas time. 

When the cones were still soft and dripping with pine resin, the squirrels were climbing the trees and pulling them off to enjoy the pine nuts.   I often pondered why the sticky resin did not glue their innards together?   This soft cone was a dud … it had no resin, and never opened its “petals” and developed into a full-fledged, brown and hard pine cone.

As the sun gently filtered through the clouds, I decided to do a shadow selfie – hmm, just a girl and her pine tree. (Somehow the phrase does not have the same ring to it as “just a girl and her gull” or “just a girl and her butterfly” does it?)

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
This entry was posted in nature, walk and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

37 Responses to Small Fall.

  1. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………….you are such an interesting and amusing story teller………………..you can take an ordinary time at an ordinary park and make it bubble with life and color…………….thank you…………………..

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked it Ann Marie. It’s funny, because sometimes I will walk through the park and see lots of ordinary every day things and nothing strikes my fancy to take a picture of or write about, and other times just a little glimmer of sunshine puts the leaves and even those now ratty-looking burrs in a different perspective. I’m off to walk … I’ll see what I can find this morning – I hate waiting so long for the sun to get up don’t you?

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I enjoy the color change in the foliage! Fall is lovely that way! I still had a hanger-on as well: I picked some strawberries from my backyard yesterday! Very nice post!

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Fall has always been my favorite season hands down Michelle. I know lots of people here in SE Michigan like the Spring season after a long Winter of blah landscape and our past two Springs have hung on forever, but I like the Fall colors, decor better. Last Fall, we had a hard freeze in late September and snow in early November and I’d not cut the roses down and I found them coated in snow … it was beautiful seeing the buds with their snowy crystals though. I wrote a post called “Jack Frost nipping at your rose.” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Michael says:

    How very fabulous

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sarebear's Writing Spot says:

    Hi Linda, Just wanted to let you know I’m doing my research project for my grad class: habitats, adaptation and evolution, on the Eastern Grey Squirrel and how human activity affects them in urban settings in Washington State & North Carolina (my partner for the project lives in NC) so I will be your go to for all things grey squirrel by the end of the semester 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks for telling me Sarah and I appreciate knowing that, so I will be able to pick your brain. I love the Grey and Black squirrels at the Park and the neighborhood – they are so lively, yet skittish, and I am hard pressed to get them over to see me unlike the “pushy” Fox squirrels do. I miss my porch pals I fed all last Winter – Grady the Grey Squirrel was such a sweetie, and two Black squirrels and the Jays and Cardinals … all was right with the world until the Fox squirrel started hogging all the food and refusing them to get near, and he chased Grady out into the street. I was afraid he’d be run over so I stopped. I saw a short video on my friend’s Facebook page earlier this evening and I’m going to share it with you … and you can share it with your partner for the project … great interaction of a human and a Grey Squirrel, and I also would be the woman in the park who would help out this Grey Squirrel and her baby. So would you. 😉
      https://www.msn.com/en-us/Video/animals/squirrel-stops-woman-in-park-leading-her-to-its-injured-baby/vi-AAHQ3zx?ocid=sf&fbclid=IwAR0pAbVPASD2jrx-H-BiGUVpUtFqpXcDYKVmg9Ong7GPzN2Zwenzv2rO2xE

      Like

  5. Ally Bean says:

    The yard ornament is what caught my eye in this post. I enjoy seeing them around and especially like seeing them as they age through each season. Wonder what winter will do to this one?

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I’ll have to retrace my steps as I walked a different way last Friday when I saw this flower and the squirrels in the harvest decor so I’ll try to take a peek come Winter. This construction will linger long into the Winter months – the street I take is torn up that badly. I think these metal yard ornaments look better sometimes when they age, although my boss went to the Center for Creative Studies, which is on Wayne State University’s campus, and one year he gave me a wacky-looking metal bird for my garden. He likes purple and this was lavender colored and made of hand garden tools. It’s head was a small rake to look like feathers sticking up and three hand trowels were its body and wings. The trowels were painted lavender – the rest was plain metal.
      I don’t remember what garden implement the feet were. Anyway, it was real different and I said “should I put urethane on it to keep it from rusting?” He said “the rust will enhance its look.” It did not make it to the end of the Summer … it was rusted anywhere that was not purple. I buried the feed in the dirt in case he ever stopped by and wanted to see my garden as they pretty much rusted right off from watering/rain. Next time I’ll use a clear coat.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ally Bean says:

        That’s interesting. I would have thought that the bird would have rusted in a pleasing, gradual way. Guess not. Of course I figure that outside garden decor items are as ephemeral as the flowers in the garden. They each have their time, then move on having shared their beauty and fun.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’ve seen metal yard art that weathered the elements nicely too … this bird’s deterioration was abysmal … I pushed it into a corner, burying its feet in the dirt and finally gave it the ol’ heave ho. They should have treated it with something. On my walks, I pass a house where they put one of those large sun outlines on the front of their home which has white siding. The sun has rusted, leaving a brown trail down the front of the house and I don’t understand why they don’t fix it as they have a beautifully landscaped home.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ally Bean says:

        The ways in which people maintain the exteriors of their properties could be a whole blog unto itself. There’s much to judge, little to understand about *why*?

        Liked by 2 people

  6. The spots on the maple tree is called Maple Tar Spot. Why do I know this? Because my 2 maple trees have it too and it is a fungus. Although it looks awful it doesn’t kill the tree. My trees aren’t as bad this year as they were last year. I am so excited for fall, my favorite season. Love seeing all the color in your pictures!

    Liked by 3 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Well thank you for that info Diane. I’ve been walking at Council Point Park since 2013 and every year it is the same thing – polka dots on the leaves and it’s otherwise healthy. I’m guessing they don’t spray the trees there. They plant them, stake them and let nature take its course. Fall is my favorite season too – we have a crummy day, raining hard and thundering through noon and it’s actually chilly in the house!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Prior... says:

    Not pining yet…. but did hear a radio program (science Friday show) where a caller called in and said he ate pine needles on hikes – added them to hot chocolate

    Liked by 2 people

  8. lindasschaub says:

    Ouch! Maybe it was Scotch Pine which are very soft and have long needles. I once did a post in mid-July when the Poplar fuzz was flying everywhere and it was a humid day. I passed a house which has multiple pine trees and also has planted mint … I could not see that mint, but I sure could smell it. My neighbor’s husband liked iced tea and she planted lots of mint to float in his iced tea and on humid morning it smelled wonderful. So, with the abundant Poplar fluff on the lawns, the mint smell which was like candy canes and fragrant pine trees, it seemed like Christmas to me.

    Like

  9. WalkFrederick says:

    What a lovely document of changes. I’ve noticed lots of trees starting to change just this past week. But the heat! It’s still hitting 90! We’ll get there soon enough I suppose. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Michelle – my favorite time of year. We are going to set a record on Tuesday, close to 90. There is no happy medium in the the U.S. it seems – Montana is set to have a record snowfall!
      fo

      Like

  10. Chocoviv says:

    Beautiful blooms!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you Chocoviv – I am surprised they are still blooming – our weather is wacky, one day hot, the next cold. Today we have stormy and rainy weather and it’s below normal; tomorrow above-normal temps, in the mid-80s!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I love to see the changes that fall brings. We have a few liquid ambers around here but I haven’t seen them put on their autumn colors yet. And, no, I’m definitely not anxious for Christmas yet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      The colors in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan are usually at peak by mid-October. I will try to get some nice leaf colors that weekend because one gusty wind can strip the trees in no time. My neighbor has a maple and it slowly turns red and one day you’ll look out there and admire it and it generally drops all its leaves over two days. It seems hard to believe that three months and the holidays will be over.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I so look forward to your beautifully written posts Linda. You really have a way with words and really bring the nature you talk about alive ❤.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Joni says:

    I don’t know how I missed this post Linda, but I’m reading it now…..I would certainly welcome a bit cooler weather and some leaf changes, but not that dreaded snow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Well, I’m glad you caught up Joni – I am perpetually behind. This morning the alarm went off and I decided to roll over as it was pouring and rumbling out there – woke up with a start and it was late for me. This was a “squirrel-less” post and about our early color changes – I read last week that peak color for SE Michigan will be after mid-October, specifically October 19th. But that prediction was made for the Fall travel campaign here in our state and I think they could not be accurate after this last week of wacky weather and its highs and lows … I hope that by the time it is peak color that the rain and bad weather is done by then. The more I hear about chilly and rainy November with snow at American Thanksgiving, seven major snowstorms and a Polar Vortex for Winter, I am sorry I disparaged Summer. That is the “Farmer’s Almanac” prediction – they get it right more than the weathermen these days!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s