Nope, not just a fish tale.

It is the Lenten season; it is Friday … and for sure we need a diversion, so I am offering up this catch-of-the-day fish tale for my post-of-the-day.

This trek actually happened last Friday, March 27th. I ventured out after it had rained from Thursday afternoon, throughout the night, stopping just short of dawn. It was dreary, drab, dull and damp- how’s that for a description? It looked as if it would pour raining any minute, as dark clouds were brooding overhead.


I got to Council Point Park, opened up my bag of peanuts and looked for my furry and feathered friends as no one came over to see me. Even the smell of fresh peanuts wafting out of the bag did not entice any peanut participants, so I ambled along the perimeter path, alone on the asphalt and alone in my thoughts.

The perimeter path is about ten feet wide. While I didn’t take a yardstick with me, I stomped across in my heavy walking shoes and that was around eleven of MY feet, so I’m guessing it is a ten-foot-wide path. I figured since no one was looking, I could measure it … for social distancing purposes you know.

The Park looked a little desolate – no walkers, no critters. The playground equipment had been taped off with bright-yellow caution tape, similar to what the police use to cordon off a crime site. I had read on social media this practice was instituted statewide the day before.

Out of the corner of my eye I finally saw a sign of life, a big, fat Robin tugging on an equally big, fat worm. The torrential rain had pounded into the ground softening the earth and I could sense that Robin’s glee about its discovery. I was treated to a surly, if not cautionary, look as I approached, as if to say “just touch my worm Girly – don’t even think of it!” Robins always have that bad boy demeanor don’t they? They look at you face on, like the stern librarian did when you dared to utter a few words in the hallowed halls of the local library – at least that’s how it was when I was growing up.

I kind of chuckled to myself at the antics as the worm held its own, resisting mightily against each of the Robin’s tugs. I didn’t want to witness the gory final slurp, so I continued on my way. I rounded the bend over near the Creek and heard some birds tuning up, first the Red-Winged Blackbird trilling in the chilly morning air and then a Song Sparrow or two with a range of melodic notes. Great – I no longer felt so alone out there on the path, but still no squirrels.

Seeing none of my Park furry friends these days is worrisome for this squirrel lover. Sadly, I’ve learned to scan the not-so-friendly skies above the Park lately, since the Cooper’s Hawk has been trolling almost daily. I see this pesky bird of prey gliding about, surveying the premises for its next capture. I feel a little sick every time I witness a Hawk glaring down from the electrical towers or a tall tree. Just then, a Cooper’s Hawk passed overhead. “Aah” I thought, “that explains why the welcoming committee is MIA this morning.” The Hawk glided effortlessly, a dark blotch in the gray sky, and, as he tilted his wings ever so slightly, I noticed some small birds, likely Sparrows, take a quick detour, scattering in the wind, not unlike when a cue ball sends the billiard balls across the felt surface of a pool table in one quick motion.

But the closer I got to the trees on the other side of the “loop” a Blue Jay looked down from his high perch and screeched – wow, what a brave boy he was, fearless of the Hawk! Then a second screech – so was that a disgruntled noise since a Hawk was present in the Park, or just my cue to get cracking and give him some peanuts?

I didn’t take the camera out, as it was too gray of a day to do so, but I rose to the request and feeling generous, I let three peanuts tumble to the path. That Jay blitzed down to the ground in a heartbeat, politely surveying the booty, then picking up one scraggly looking peanut, quickly tossing it aside in favor of a longer peanut (perhaps a triple-nut prize). That picky Jay then flew away, the coveted peanut clenched in its long and lethal-looking beak. The Cardinal who previously had held back, somewhat timid of the imposing Jay, soon swooped down for the leftovers.

I sighed, sorry I had not taken the camera out, but there would be other bird photo ops.

The avian action continued when a Downy Woodpecker was content to peck away at the damp wood on its tree and paid me no mind and neither did a White-Breasted Nuthatch who surveyed me from its upside down pose. It was the first time to see these type of birds and it was a real treat. They were both at eye level; of course, once again I reckoned these would have made pretty good shots, had I simply taken the camera out of the case and had it at the ready.

“They’ll be other shots down the road” I told myself.

The Red-Bellied Woodpecker peered at me from the dead tree as he had heard the Jay calling. Interestingly he created a “first” for me at my favorite nature nook by doing a flyover and zooming down to the ground. Now this has happened at the “Birdie Nirvana station” at Elizabeth Park – never at this venue though. Once again I cursed myself for not having the camera handy.

“They’ll be other shots down the road” I told myself.

As I neared the cement landing, just as I always do, I peered between the bushes looking for Harry the Heron, but instead of that gangly bird, I saw a chair on the cement ledge and knew there must be a fisherman there.

But I didn’t see anyone right away, just the chair. “Hope he didn’t fall in!” I thought. I rounded the bend and saw a young man crouched down on the ledge with a big dip net floating on top of the water. Two fishing rods were propped up against the nearby wall. I stood and watched thinking “you’re dreaming Buddy – there’s no way you need that for the shad, those tiny silver fish about the size of minnows!” Luckily I didn’t voice my opinion as suddenly, he scooped up a huge fish.

I stood and watched as there was a lot of movement in the water. Mere seconds later, he lifted the net and a huge fish was flailing around inside it. He set the net onto the cement landing and the fish continued thrashing about. By now, a walker appeared out of nowhere, coming from the opposite direction on the path, saw the action and we both stood there, transfixed with our eyes glued to the fish in the net. The young man picked his fish up with both hands, as he cradled the catch of the day in his arms. Finally the fish relaxed just a little …

Ever your roving reporter, I said “I’ve been walking in this Park since 2013 and have never seen a fish this size – it’s mostly just shad. I write a blog about walking – can I get your picture?” These words spilled out of my mouth while unzipping my coat, then wiggling my left hand into the vest’s zippered pocket to retrieve the camera. “Sure” he said and belatedly I saw the other walker had already pulled his phone out and was taking a picture or video. Remembering my “who, what, where, when, why and how” from my school days eons ago, I fired off questions like “what kind of fish it is?” It was a Carp we were told. Then I asked “how much do you think it weighs?” He struggled to keep the fish from flopping onto the ground, but picked it up and held it – it had to be two feet big! He didn’t tell me how much it weighed, it was wiggling around too much.

The fisherman handled that fish with one arm and hand while he grabbed his phone and handed it over to the other walker asking “would you mind taking a photo for me Bro?” The guy did so, then the fisherman bent down close to the water and released the fish (who got the heck out of Dodge before the guy changed his mind). I said “I thought you might be keeping it for a Friday fish fry for Lent” and he laughed and said “no, the water’s not safe.” I agreed – the Creek water is dank and dark. The fisherman watched his prize fish until the water was still again.

By now we were all standing fairly close and I turned to both and said “yikes – we forgot all about social distancing – we were all so caught up in the moment!” The fisherman piped up with “I’m clean” and we both hurried to announce ourselves as “clean” as well. Then we all had a little laugh over it. The other walker said “it’s human nature – we were enjoying this fish story too much!”

I told them to stay safe, which seems to be the post script to our conversations, e-mails and blog posts these days, and, as I once again ambled down the pathway, a blog post was bubbling around in my brain.

I kept the camera in my hand for the duration of the trek, intending to return to the area where the Red-Winged Blackbird trilled and the Cardinals, Jays, Woodpeckers and Nuthatch thrilled me, but there were no birds to be found. The Cooper’s Hawk, still circling overhead kept my squirrels tucked in their hidey holes. I knew the weekend would be rainy both days, so I left a pile of peanuts on the picnic table for my furry friends for when they finally emerged.

I now know what type of fish makes the big splashes that I hear as I walk along on my treks in late Spring. Just like clockwork, I’d hear huge belly flops and see water drops spraying up during spawning season, yet I could not see through the bushes to see the fish acrobatics.

And that my friends is your fish tale for the day.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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61 Responses to Nope, not just a fish tale.

  1. Sandra J says:

    A wonderful post as always Linda, I enjoyed the walk with you. I can picture all the pictures you were going to take. What a fish, I have never seen a carp, that is probably what is jumping around the Mississippi river also.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Sandra – I’ve never seen a fish that big in these waters but I sure hear them chasing one another. Once the bushes and saplings fill in, I will not see anything even I try to peer through the trees. Yes, I was annoyed at myself for not taking out the camera. It was chilly and damp though from the rain and so gray, I thought why take the camera out for all these conditions. Yes, annoyed at myself and I never see a Nuthatch or Downy Woodpecker at this venue – ever. Glad you enjoyed the walk with me. The post did not go to Reader and WordPress did not know what the problem was, so I reposted it as I wanted it to show up on Friday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        That is probably the same fish that is down here also. And there are always fishermen out there. I don’t know if they are good to eat. But, I don’t think I want to eat any fish out of the Mississippi River.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        No one would want to eat anything from that Creek. It is dark and muddy and in the Summer, like those 90-degree days in August, it is full of algae bloom. Then the ducks and geese are gone anyway as they lose their flight feathers, so they go to larger parks where they can stay in the water in groups and are better protected from predators til their feathers return. That’s smart of them because the bigger bodies of water don’t have as much algae bloom as they have a stronger current. I see fishermen fishing for shad – I really don’t understand that as they are very small fish.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I did not know that about the feathers until you mentioned it. I guess people that love to fish, just love to fish for anything. I like fishing, I am just not very good at it. And fishing license cost so much sometimes it is not worth it. I try to take advantage of the free fishing weekends Michigan has if I am at the cabin though. I have it on my calander. I think it is July.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, you are right … I didn’t realize the license was expensive. I’ve never gotten a license. I just went on the DNR website for Michigan and they say the free fishing days are:
        Free Fishing Weekend (June 13 & 14)
        https://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-350-79119_79146_84107—,00.html

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I wrote it on my calendar, and saved the website. I have so many things saved in favorites. I organized it awhile ago and made folders for every catagory. They are filling up with your help finding so many interesting things. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Glad to pass interesting things along to you Sandra – just thinking as I write this, this week and next is the prime time for the cranes in Nebraska. I’ll bet not many people are traveling to that event this year.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        I bet the cranes are loving it though, all the wildlife can go where ever they want. Not so many people out and about. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, and I saw a story last night – where did I see it? I saved it I believe as I wanted to read it and pass it along … it showed animals in the street because there are no people – just amazing. I have to find it. My friend posts tons of stories on Facebook and since I don’t get time always to read them, I save them … then Facebook sends messages to remind me to read it. Hopefully I can find it today. I have to head out. No incentive without a walk, just give me the boot! I have hungry mouths to feed out there and they’ll be knocking at the door pretty soon.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Michael says:

    A pleasure to read as ever…

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Eliza says:

    You know Linda, I could see it all without pictures. I love your pictures because they’re awesome, but just your written word tells a story all on its own.

    That jaybird sure is brave! I wish you could send the hawk away…. I’m happy that the furries know to protect themselves and stay away – stay safe 🙂

    I’m glad the guy put the fish back. Made me sad that part, that he took it out. You learned something new about the water you know. Hey, you know, if you exchange blog info with the walkers next time you’ll make some more friends…

    Awesome to read this now! I felt like I was right there with you.

    Keep walking! With or without a mask.

    Love, light, and all the glitter

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you enjoyed this post Ellie. I was already writing it in my head as I was walking away. It was a surprise – I never see anything more than the piddly little shad fish, although I hear them plopping into the water. A guy at the Park that’s been walking there many years told me that he saw turtles sunning themselves yesterday – we had a beautiful sunny day yesterday too.

      I’m glad he put the fish back as well. He has his picture to remember it by.

      I’m glad you felt like you were walking alongside me. I kept cursing myself for not taking the camera with me.

      I reblogged this post as WordPress was stymied what the problem was why it did not go to Reader, just to subscribers. Hope it does not keep happening but I guess worse things could happen.

      Love, light, and all the glitter back at you Ellie.

      Like

  4. Fred Bailey says:

    A Carp:

    King of the bottom feeders. They’ll eat anything almost, but not peanuts!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Good thing Fred – they might be jumping out of the water and chasing after me! Years ago I had a pair of Kissing Gourami fish in a bowl that sat on a shelf in he basement. My mom did not want them upstairs. She went downstairs to do laundry and found one of them had flopped out onto the floor – she didn’t like fish to begin with, let alone one on the floor. When I came home from school she said “deal with that dead fish!” I went downstairs and picked it up – it moved, and I put it into a jar on its own and it came to life! It lived for a while after that experience.

      Like

      • Fred Bailey says:

        Yes, Carp, goldfish , Koi, essentially all the same fish, can live out of the water fro a very long time. Do you remember Bronte just west of Oakville. I used to bow hunt carp in the marshes there at the mouth of the twelve-mile creek. Some of them were over three feet long. It’s all yuppie-yacht marinas now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I didn’t know that Fred, but I remember that I marched upstairs to tell my mom it was still alive. She didn’t believe me and went downstairs to see for herself. I remember Bronte, but only my parents mentioning the name – I had just turned ten when we left Oakville. I didn’t know you could bow-hunt a fish. That is a large fish! I think I mentioned to you once that I wanted to see our house in Oakville and remembered the address – did a Google map and it did not match up and was between two houses I did not recall. I joined an Oakville Facebook Group which often reminisces about Oakville in years gone by. The Group Administrator went over to Sandmere Place and took pics of the house that stands there now – he sent me a real estate tour as well. They razed all the houses on the cul de sac, all built in 1959, and built them either two-story or closer together. I forget the price of them, but it was astronomical.

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  5. It’s nice that he let the fish live for another day!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Linda Schaub says:

    Reblogged this on WALKIN', WRITIN', WIT & WHIMSY and commented:

    My apologies to the folks who subscribe to this blog via e-mail or another means, as they will receive this post twice today. I am having problems once again with a post not showing up in Reader. The WordPress Happiness Engineers tried clearing the cache at their end, but this post which I published at 8:00 a.m. today is still not showing up in Reader.

    Like

  7. Catherine Brabant says:

    Wow, That is a big fish! I’ve been there & never saw anyone fishing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I know – I was amazed Cathy! I only see shad there all the time and the fish the goose was wrangling a few months ago was big, but not something you’d go fishing for! I now know what type of fish is splashing in the water when they chase each other during spawning season.

      Like

  8. Cool catch! My grandfather and i would go fishing when i was a kid. I remember that he would catch Carps that were over 4 feet long. They were huge. He would have a crowd of people watching him while reeled them in. He would then give them away to the poor people.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Tom. I had no idea that a fish this large would be in this Creek. It’s not that big of a body of water. This angler was cool as a cucumber pulling that fish out of the water in his net – I think the other walker and I were more excited than he was (although he did want a picture of it). That was so nice of your grandfather; I had no idea that a Carp would get that large – that fish would have fed a lot of people.

      Like

      • It would have fed a lot of people! They were so large and powerful that he would struggle with them a good 30 to 40 minutes and have a big crowd of people surrounding him watching him try to get it in. He had a “special dough-ball bait recipe” that he used to get them. He wouldn’t even tell me his secret recipe. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Really – that’s a long time to reel in a fish Tom! He was lucky he did not break the pole, or his reel, trying to bring those fish in – no wonder people gathered around to see this sight. That bait must have tasted good to draw those fish to it like that. Just like Bark Butter and Bark Butter Bits draw the backyard birds. I followed a woman who bought her bird supplies from a Wild Birds Unlimited store. These are items made just by WBU. She slathered the bark butter on backyard trees and mixed the bark butter bits with food – then she got her camera ready.

        Like

  9. Laurie says:

    Haha! I had to laugh at your description of robins as “bad boys”. My middle son is Robin and he is the opposite of a bad boy! He is the kindest most considerate person I know! And I would say that even if I weren’t his mom.
    I can remember once when I was a girl and fishing with my dad for carp in a nearby stream, we caught a golden carp using corn for bait. I was thrilled and wanted to keep the fish, but my dad insisted we throw it back since it was not fit to eat. This carp reminded me of that golden carp of over 50 years ago!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      That is funny Laurie – I should not have generalized! All the Robins I have encountered have a ton of attitude. Pretty soon they will be building a nest over the coach light at the front door – we have an annual war about that. In fact, I’ve been finding little clumps of dead grass on the lawn – when I see them on the front porch I have to look up right away.

      This carp really had a golden hue didn’t it? I went fishing with my father one time – he had a rod and reel and I had just a long bamboo pole with a string, bobber and a hook. He had lures and worms and I took popcorn and put it on the hook. I caught a big pike! He didn’t throw it back – brought it home, but never did anything with it (like clean it to eat). He was miffed he didn’t catch anything. I, on the other hand, was feeling pretty smug. Well, you did well with your big carp and I was ecstatic about my pike. I have a picture of it too.

      Like

  10. I have both fishy posts. This is the first one I came to.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Dear Ms.”Catch of the Day” story……………………………………….that was quite a nice big fish picture you were able to be there at the right time………………………………I’m so happy that he let him go back into the water…………………………..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I was happy I got the camera out in time to take his picture before he let it go. That fish quieted down somewhat after he held it in his arms. Of course I thought of how you and Steven drove all the way to Gibralter to fish sometimes and could have just gone down the end of your street instead!

      Like

  12. always wear a jacket larger than what you would normally wear Linda. That way you can keep your camera around your neck and protected inside. You always want to be as quick as a gunslinger with your camera!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was so gray that morning Wayne that I was just going to leave the camera at home, but it is in my zippered vest pocket, so just left the house with it. But too much hand movement to reach it, especially in Winter. And sometimes you know you see a bird and figure by the time you take the picture, it will fly away – nope, everyone stayed put, everyone stayed on the pathway long enough for many pictures. I once said in a post that I felt like a gunslinger when I reach for my camera, careful not to startle whatever I was taking the photo of. Sometimes they see that slight hand movement and fly off.

      Like

      • thats why If you already had it around your neck you’d have far fewer movement

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, but I only had the compact digital that day – I only take the big camera out on the weekends in the Winter, except for the time I went down to the River to look for eagles on a Friday morning. It was cold, but it was the first time there was sun in weeks. I take the big camera more in the Summer as it is light so early in the morning I can drive, get down there and back and still walk and take pictures with time to spare. It was very gray that day with the fish.

        Like

      • fine,smaller camera is ok,It just needs to be right there in your hand or you can get it within a second!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I wasn’t going to take it out as it was a very crummy day – so gray out. I think if I continue to walk (didn’t today – very rainy and we have a stormy day on tap today) I will be leaving the camera at home to avoid touching around my face. Maybe at the house – house squirrels, a few buds on lilacs or magnolias would be okay … maybe in the neighborhood walking to the park, not sure on the latter though. I wanted to monitor that small perfectly formed nest at the church in the eaves (where the angel tilting was) … churches are closed, so will dwell on that … no one is there and they have gorgeous tulips and a magnolia tree … hate to pass it up, but Spring will be here next year. I’d like to collect a few images for Earth Day that are new, but I can use old photos for now.

        Like

      • the best time to photograph flowers is on overcast days

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I didn’t know that Wayne – I took some flowers on my way home the other day – going to write about some flowers in the ‘hood; I found out they were daffodils and thought for years they were tulips (from my vantage point across the street).

        Like

      • yes,I always say overcast days are good for weddings,flowers and nudes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Hmm – well I will take your advice when I next go to take flower pictures. I am guessing it is because of the shadows, correct? I still have some flower shots to share from the botanical gardens at Heritage Park. I went there last year hoping to see a hummingbird on a very hot and humid morning, but no luck. As to the weddings and nudes … don’t think I will be taking photos of either, but thanks for the tip.

        Like

      • yes,the light is diffused and soft. No shadows or burned out areas

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        OK, I see. I had wanted to learn some of the wildflowers this year … not so much at my park, but the larger parks. As to the light, I found the day I went to the River in February, happy to have a sunny day at least, even though it was bitter cold, the sun actually made some of my pictures too dark … for the most part, the only salvageable photos were those taken up close. Meanwhile, taking the second set of cookie pictures has been challenging. Yesterday they said it was foggy and drizzly at 5:00 a.m. so I didn’t “make” the second batch. By 8:30 it was sunny – grrrr. Today it is 20 degrees colder, blustery, maybe drizzly and maybe snow flurries. I may have to try on Saturday morning, the only semi-decent morning in the next 10 days and I want to do the post Saturday if possible. I’ve not written it- in my head still. I’ve been trying to catch up WordPress, but still behind a day and a half. We are set for a chilly spell so I need to get to the Park to feed the squirrels and birds … the ground is frozen and they can’t dig up their peanuts. I’ll mask up but just make a dash there in between raindrops.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. ruthsoaper says:

    The Robins here seem very fat this year. Have you noticed that in your area? That was a good size fish. I’m sure he needed to have a picture because otherwise it would have been just another fish tale.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I noticed that too Ruth and wondered if maybe the grubs they get did not hibernate or die since we had a mild Winter – so maybe they are chowing down and that’s why they’re so fat. Yes, he was lucky someone came by just then – I guess he would have had to take the shot of the fish laying on the ledge and it wouldn’t have been the same. It would have made a good fish dinner from its size – that water is really filthy though and we have lots of algae bloom in the Summer months as there is not much current.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Yay for fish tales. Fun post as always.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. That fish is huge and a pretty yellow! I thought the fish would be taken home and cooked. I’m sure people who fish knows which is safe and unsafe waters.
    My kids love squirrels too. They named a neighborhood squirrel “Fretz.” They think other ones are all Fretz following them. If they look different, it must be their relatives, they say.
    Hope you are having a good Sunday!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I hear the fish splashing in late Spring but had no idea that big of a fish was in this small Creek. You could have fooled me. I do get a kick out of the squirrels at the Park and my house – I have a “following” – it helps that I am never without peanuts. I have a cute gray squirrel at the house named “Grady” – I thought everywhere I am outside, he is right there near me – turns out it is a buddy or a mate as they both showed up begging at the same time! Fretz is cute name. Today went by so fast – I decided to sleep in and that was a big mistake. The day was over before I knew it!

      Like

      • You can hear fish splashing?? That’s pretty cool. I wish I lived near nature like that to make those observations. Maybe that’s why I love Thoreau’s nature journal so much.
        I’ll have to tell my kids about Grady the squirrel in Michigan. How funny you named your squirrel too.
        Don’t feel bad you slept in! There are just days when your body needs extra sleep. I am sleepy all the time as kids pry my eyes open when they wake up and think that I’m bursting with energy…I tell them it’s the power of coffee. hahah
        Take care and stay well!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        We had some rumbles of thunder last night and despite all that sleep on Sunday, I decided to head to bed early again. I don’t like to use the computer if it is storming – even during work hours. I would like curly hair, but not getting it that way! I do have a regular “following” at the Park – in fact I often write about Parker, the cute Fox Squirrel who follows me around, steps on my shoes when he tries to reach the bag where I keep the nuts. He sometimes stops and waits when I drive, parking himself next to the car. So I write about him all the time. I have even written a couple of posts like they were written by him. This was Parker in my Valentine’s Day post – your kids might like this:
        https://lindaschaubblog.net/2020/02/14/its-valentines-day/
        I also have Grady, the Gray Squirrel and Pitch and Tar, two black squirrels. At the Park, there is a black squirrel called Midnight and a Fox Squirrel missing half his tail called Stubby. You stay well too Esther – we have a very rainy day today, even stormy. Hope I don’t get hopelessly behind here because of that.

        Like

  16. Joni says:

    I’ve heard plenty about the (bad) carp in the river, but have never seen one – I didn’t even know they were yellow. Thanks for the fishy tail! Yes, sometimes when you’re chatting with the neighbours it’s hard to remember the social distancing thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I can’t say I’ve ever seen a carp – and it was huge. I hear fish flopping, jumping in the water while walking, especially during spawning season (late April, maybe May) but never got a picture of them. We all forgot and went rushing over like it was a novelty –
      it was for this Park … at the Detroit riverfront you see big fish, but never here.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. What a great story. I’m glad that the fisherman let the poor thing go. I bet the fish had quite a story to tell his friends about his experience! Good job with your who, what, where, and when… you are a pro! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Janis – it was so funny as everyone has been staying to their own side of the path and here we all rushed toward this fisherman, like we’ve never seen a person catch a fish before. 🙂 The anglers line the Detroit River all the time – they catch a lot of fish, especially once Walleye season begins – the anglers and also the boats are side by side as there are so many fish. But in this small Creek – that’s a first. Yes, I remembered something from school, all those years ago – nice I could finally apply those teachings all these years later!

      Liked by 1 person

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