The Breakfast Club (no, it’s not what you’d think).

My walking regimen not only benefits my health and gives me a year-end goal to strive for, but, as you know, I am a soft touch for those furry and feathered friends at Council Point Park.

When I first started walking at this venue in April of 2013, I decided it would be fun to feed the squirrels, who surely saw a friendly face (or more likely a sucker) and came bounding over to see me. Soon packages of Hampton Farms peanuts were flying off the shelf and into my grocery cart.

In the beginning, I started off with just a small Ziploc bag of peanuts for each visit. I’d divvy up that cellophane bag of peanuts into sandwich-sized Ziploc bags, then put the bags into a cookie jar, ready to grab-n-go every morning. Through the years my offerings morphed into larger Ziploc bags, then I got a following of songbirds and a Woodpecker, so I added a small Ziploc bag of black oiler sunflower seeds. Holiday photo shoots had me toting along cookies or pumpkins and even apples at harvest time. Sometimes I tuck an extra treat to share with Parker … well, just because.

The last time I shopped at Meijer, I made a beeline to the wild bird feeding supplies to buy cracked corn. The cracked corn purchase, however, was not because I was overly indulgent to my Park pals. Nope – I had method in my madness as you will see later in this post.

Wheaties, the breakfast of champions.

You’ve likely heard that slogan for Wheaties breakfast cereal. I always have a hearty breakfast, and, even though I’ve eaten Wheaties in the past, I am a big fan of oatmeal and have it every morning. During the course of last Winter, I noticed something new as I walked along the Park perimeter path – breakfast cereal was making a regular appearance on the trail. The squirrels and birds were lovin’ it, an indulgent sweet treat that helped break the monotony of peanuts and seeds while February’s brutally cold winds swirled about and mounds of snow piled up.

I’m cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs!

I dug into my zippered coat pocket to drag out the camera and get these shots of the “Kix Corn Puffs” and “Cocoa Puffs” which some kindly soul had strewn on the walking path.

I watched Puff’s head swivel between the offerings and he lapped up a few Cocoa Puffs, then planted himself in the snow to enjoy them, even glaring at me, lest I try to take them away.

A few days later, heart-healthy “Cheerios” magically appeared in the small recess of a dilapidated old tree where I usually dump peanuts when the ground is wet or snow covered.

And, hopefully my Park pals paid attention to another “drop” – a Clementine. Nothing beats some fresh OJ with your breakfast cereal … just sayin’.

Breakfast is served my little friends.

In life, all good things must come to an end (often through no fault of our own).

I believe this dilemma began the day I took the photos for my Easter post.

As you know, last Fall I knew I had to find a safe haven or two to spread treats, after Cooper’s Hawks were regularly gliding through the not-so-friendly skies over Council Point Park. They were in pursuit of prey, eyeing my furry pals and making a few unsuccessful swoops in my presence. I had always used the picnic tables under the pavilion roof to spread out treats during the Winter or inclement weather, but the tables were hauled away in early Fall, likely due to COVID and they only recently returned a couple of weeks ago.

So I resorted to spreading treats under The Safe Haven Tree, a/k/a a Weeping Mulberry with its spikey branches that nearly sweep the ground. I also doled out treats in a small alcove with a couple of tree stumps and a fallen log. These two locations not only provided a secure place for my furry and feathered friends to feast, but it also gave me some fun photo ops.

Unfortunately, I now need to have a Plan “B” due to The Interlopers.

The Interlopers – who are they?

When I’m toting cookies which will be used for a holiday post, I spread out all the goodies at stop number one, then go to the next stop, clear across Council Point Park. That way, each subsequent loop that I walk, I can monitor the action and take pictures.

However, for the Easter shoot, I did this process in reverse. That day, I stopped at the alcove first, then bopped on over to The Safe Haven Tree. I was spreading the treats under the tree when fellow walker Joann stopped to tell me to get over to the other side of the Park as “I just saw the most peaceful scene – ducks on a log and geese gathered around them and the sun was shining down – it was nice Linda. Go get some pictures!” “Wait! What? Where was this Joann?” She explained and I sighed “oh no, the geese saw the treats – but you said ducks are there too?” I left the Safe Haven Tree, then hustled clear across the Park and this is what I saw.

Well, yes – it was idyllic all right. The ducks were clearly positioned for more handouts. The cookies did not appeal to them in the least, just the seeds and peanuts. After I took these pictures, I shooed them all into the water. Yes, it was not nice of me, but I was not feeding the waterfowl – nope, not gonna happen!

A few minutes later, the squirrels, who were aghast over these shenanigans, came out to see if the coast was clear and they could gain access to THEIR treats (what was left of them).

You can read Fluff’s face like a book in these photos … “OMG – is the coast clear now Linda? Why were they eating OUR treats?”

I always keep some peanuts handy in a pocket in case some squirrels and birds slept in and come begging at my feet, so I poured my “reserve” out.

When I’m taking photos for a holiday post, I go on a weekend, so I can walk a few more loops without watching the clock and I can monitor the progress of the feasting and take more pictures. I stayed at this feeding area a little longer to ensure I didn’t have to shoo off the ducks and geese a second time.

When the waterfowl didn’t return, I continued on my walk, leaving for home about an hour later. Little did I know this scamming by the waterfowl would become a daily and annoying occurrence.

Treat buddies.

The very next day, I scoped out the little alcove area before laying down peanuts and seeds. Happily, the coast was clear of any waterfowl, so I laid down the treats, watched a few minutes, camera in hand. After a minute’s time, a few squirrels came over, eager to chomp on some peanuts.

When I laid the seeds down, I noted the new handiwork on the log, i.e. this lovestruck scribble.

I stood back a few paces and awaited the arrival of the Chickadees and other birds to feast on the sunflower seeds, hoping the encroachers were merely a fluke.

But then The Interlopers returned.

First, I saw the head of a male Mallard as he waddled up the Creek bank and joined the unsuspecting Fox squirrel who was blissfully munching a peanut.

Then, the female Mallard tentatively peeked around the corner and waddled over to join the party.

Unbelievably the Fox squirrel didn’t pay attention to either of them as they feasted companionably, with no one moving about as I was busy taking photos. I was willing to live with the ducks scamming a few sunflower seeds and nuts, but then a pair of Canada Geese emerged from the water and sneakily inched up the Creek bank and headed over to see what was for breakfast. I raised my voice uttering a few choice words and lamenting “I don’t recall sounding any dinner bell for ducks and geese!” But my words fell on deaf ears as clearly they were here to stay.

Thus, I bought cracked corn to lure the geese and ducks from eating the peanuts which has become a nearly every day occurrence at this location. So how’d that work out you ask? I’ve began making little piles of seeds, peanuts and corn to strew along the path believing it would both foil and frustrate the waterfowl and I rather enjoyed thwarting their efforts to monopolize the food. BUT … the squirrels like the corn and the geese are eating the peanuts! My efforts have been abysmal. For example, this past Saturday, a Canada Goose marched over to the pile of peanuts and began crunching and munching on them. Your Roving Reporter whipped out her camera and those shots will be a future post which I’ll entitle “The Peanut Party Pooper” – so please stay tuned.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
This entry was posted in nature, walk, walking and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

99 Responses to The Breakfast Club (no, it’s not what you’d think).

  1. Oh, my, gosh, Linda – what fun you had – your story is delightful to read. That’s amazing that the squirrels and the Mallards were able to dine together. You sure have a gift of finding great photo ops with them too. Nice composition to the photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the pictures of Fluff! He does seem utterly appalled at this turn of events. Competition for food is an unavoidable feature of the natural world. You got some beautiful pictures of the mallards, though. I wonder how breakfasts will play out as the seasons change. The squirrel and the mallard sharing the peanuts is a hopeful sign. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – glad you liked the photos. I was angry at this turn of events, but it did make for some fun photos. And yes, the critters get along, sometimes better than we humans do. The Fox squirrel seemed oblivious to the ducks and even the geese, just munching on his peanuts contently, which made me smile. But the smaller black and gray squirrels were afraid of the ducks and geese. Fluff is a cutie pie and I was glad to have captured the look on his face and his actions. 🙂 I think this dilemma will continue until the end of June, unless the arrival of the goslings in the next few weeks will have them distracted as they move about the Park grazing on grass (not peanuts/seeds) with their brood. By the end of June, you see large flight feathers laying around on the grass in the Park and the geese begin to molt so they take the goslings by water to larger waterfront parks along the Detroit River – the Detroit River is only one mile away. They can’t fly during molting so they must have a safe haven in the water – they often paddle down to Elizabeth Park and congregate there. Council Point Park used to spray a grape concentrate on the grass as the geese don’t like the taste and will go elsewhere to graze.
      They spray until Labor Day as people don’t want to walk or picnic or use the playground with the geese around. I don’t think they did that last year as they were behind in mowing and keeping up the Park after it reopened on June 2nd after being closed the month of May. The ducks will molt too but a little later in the Summer.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s hard to manage nature. Yesterday a deer came and ate at my neighbor’s bird feeder. From the feeder, not the ground. I’ve never seen that before and I was amazed as she tilted it slightly to get the seeds to slide out. That was on determined deer! Things are leafing out here so food should be plentiful but she wanted a treat!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ally Bean says:

    When you mentioned the Interlopers I thought you might be referring to humans who disapprove of feeding people food to wild birds and squirrels. But it was those darned old geese, of course.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well funny you mention humans Ally, because a couple of weeks ago, I was hunched over under the Safe Haven Tree and turned around to straighten up again and saw a new walker. I said “good morning” to this woman (who I’d say was about 40) and she said “no wonder the squirrels are so aggressive at this park – you feed them!” I was taken aback and she continued, saying “there is an ordinance against feeding the animals in this park.” I should have let it go, but defended myself and said “the squirrels aren’t aggressive; they beg because there are several people who feed them regularly and there’s no ordinance in this park for feeding any critters, but there IS an ordinance for walking dogs and people do it all the time, though the ordinance is posted on two big signs. Furthermore people don’t clean up after them either.” She turned and walked the other way and I’ve not seen her since. The geese will be a pain until they molt the end of June and then they will go down to the Detroit River and await their new flight feathers – we get a reprieve from them until around Labor Day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ally Bean says:

        Ha! You told her what for and did so politely. I don’t see people feeding squirrels in our parks, but there are signs about not feeding the ducks. Couldn’t explain the logic behind the signs but there you go, all parks have different rules.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, you have to be polite, otherwise it might turn out to be a bad scene. Our 13 Metroparks, (which we have to pay to enter by purchasing a yearly or daily pass) does not allow feeding of any animals. Park rangers routinely patrol the parks to ensure compliance with those signs.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Sandra J says:

    Wonderful breakfast post Linda, now I am thinking about cereal. 🙂 What a treat for them all. I love the cheerios out on the ground. Breakfast of campions for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you enjoyed it Sandra. I originally just intended to have Puff and his Cocoa Puffs, but before I got that post done, the issue with the geese and ducks came up … so it made for a post of breakfast fun.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Joni says:

    What a wonderful story you’ve told Linda…..it deserves to be in a children’s book?! I loved the shots of the ducks, so clear and vibrant. I’m amazed they all ate together too….maybe there’s hope for world peace after all!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Joni. I have to keep the “whimsy” part of my blog title in my posts and these photos helped. I was and am annoyed but it did make for some fun shots. Those ducks were right in the sunlight and hopped onto the log like they were posing … so that was lucky for me. I was surprised the Fox squirrel didn’t mind eating with them, but the smaller black and gray squirrels hid right away. Yes, the animals can get along (when the big ones aren’t eyeing the small ones for lunch), so why can’t we humans?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Like I said….it’s a children’s book just waiting to be written when you retire, with a good morale too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you Joni – you know I would love to do that. First, the adventures of Parker the Squirrel, now the assortment of critters I meet on my daily trek at the Park. Next week, I will be doing a post about the Mute Swans fishing at the Park. I went to a larger park and stopped there before going home – lucky for me as two huge swans were diving and fishing. It was interesting.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I love mute swans so looking forward to your post. I have nothing written for next week, just a vague idea…hopefully something shorter than the 2000 words from the last book review!.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It’s supposed to rain most of Saturday – I would like to be one ahead on posts if I could, but I am long-winded and probably won’t get a second done. The mute swans were beautiful and I think it will be more pictures than words though. At least you have an idea for your next post … here’s an idea for you one time when you are scratching your head for a post idea. I was in the grocery store Tuesday and two women were buying hula hoops … I said I didn’t know kids still played with them unless they were buying them for themselves as they are good for whittling your waist. (I could say that as they were both skinny.) Anyway, our hula hoops back in the day were very plain, can’t remember the color of mine but one color only … these hoops were transparent and had another color ring inside and stars and sparkles and flowers on the transparent part … a deluxe hula hoop. You could write about childhood games … we talked about jump rope, Chinese jump rope, hop scotch … the things we did once it was warm enough to play outside. Go onto “Click on Americana” – I was looking on there tonight before I got here and they featured those horses on springs that kids sat on in the 50s and 60s. I had a regular rocking horse that matched my bedroom furniture which was gray with little black speckles. It will be 84 on Tuesday here … crazy!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        That’s a great idea Linda….for you to write! The kids at the end of my mother’s street still have hula hoops but they are pink and fancy etc. I see them discarded on the lawn. I have ideas for all of my May blogs, just no time to write, because of my other project which I will email you about sometime….making progress on it comes first!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I see – that is good news you are covered for all May. I thought you might be lacking some ideas because the weather has put a damper on Spring (until Tuesday when it will be 84 – silly weather). I don’t know how I could incorporate it into a post about walking – I one time mentioned, just like you said, that I saw some hula hoops laying on a front lawn and reminisced about using one briefly, but a paragraph long at the most. I was thinking for you as it is entertainment that is timeless, doesn’t require batteries or a USB plug to operate … kids need to get out and enjoy things besides just digital devices!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I do see lots of kids playing on the street now….with colored chalk, or basketball nets or playing catch on the street, or street hockey. More so than before the pandemic when they were all inside on their computers!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is a good thing being outside and not on the computer. Are they wearing masks since they are in a group setting? Our governor is having kids as young as two years old wear a mask in a group setting or in a restaurant and it is causing some controversy here. Here in the States, they give pastel chalk to kids in their Easter baskets, so usually I see a lot of chalk art on the sidewalks when the kids are on Easter break. I saw it one day while it was warm, then we got so cold, the kids weren’t outside. I got some pictures of some to use for Wordless Wednesday.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        No they’re not wearing masks outside, but mostly they are playing with their siblings. They have to wear masks at school though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Oh, that’s okay then, but they are encouraging people/kids to take their activities outdoors as much as possible over here, especially due to a brand-new variant that has been detected. (Sigh.)

        Liked by 1 person

  7. This was an amusing post. I’m always trying to outwit the squirrels who steal the bird’s seeds. Donations don’t always get to the intended audience.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. bekitschig says:

    Crushing your party with a quak! It’s never nice not too be invited to the party 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………I always enjoy your stories at the park!………………..the pictures of the squirrel eating with the ducks is priceless to me………………………………I’m waiting for the story of the “Peanut Party Poopers”………………………..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked it Ann Marie – the waterfowl are frustrating me (and my furry and feathered friends as well). I did find the ducks to be rather cute – who can’t like a duck? This Fox Squirrel didn’t seem upset in the least to have the ducks standing so close. The black and gray squirrels were fretting though. 🙂 I hope the pictures turned out well of the “Peanut Party Poopers” – so stay tuned. That goose went along to each pile and had the nerve to sit down to eat them!

      Like

  10. The black squirrel in the snow is precious, Linda! We had ducks when I was a kid and I remember how much they loved cracked corn, so I’m not surprised that you’re attracting some new fans at the park. Wonderful post and pictures as always, Linda! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Sabine. The black squirrel really shows up in that snowy background doesn’t he? He went running off the perimeter path with a mouthful of Cocoa Puffs in his mouth, then spit them out into the snow … I think he was savoring each one. I was watching him and laughing at the antics. I was hoping to get some ducks and maybe ducklings to try the corn – that would be fun too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, I do like the black squirrel on the snow, Linda! I can’t believe they eat Cocoa Puffs!! I’ve never had them. 😉 Good luck with feeding ducklings. That should be fun.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        My parents were kind of no-nonsense so breakfast was oatmeal of cream of wheat only, but when I got older I tried Cocoa Puffs. The draw with them is that once they water on them, the milk turns chocolate. I could see the snow had brown dots where he had dropped what he scampered off with. I am hoping for some shots of the ducklings but it may not happen at my regular Park. Last year was the first year I saw them on land. The bigger parks have more waterfowl and more youngsters. I don’t know if the parents would allow them to take the corn or not?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I learned something new about Cocoa Puffs! I was unaware that they make the milk chocolatey. I’ll be curious to see how the duck parents will react to the corn. It’s been a long time since I was around ducks. Ours were tame pets and ate just about anything we fed them. They absolutely loved cooked carrots!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, kids would love them as they would drink the rest of the milk after the cereal was gone and it was like drinking chocolate milk. I am wondering if the duck parents will allow them to eat it? Or if the goslings will be allowed to eat it? They follow their parents and do nothing but graze it seems. The first goslings were sighted by the Detroit Audubon Society in a Facebook post (they show all their field trips) so ours should arrive in the next week or so. I still wonder what happened to the Domestic Campbell Khaki Ducks at the Park – I never saw them again and only hope that someone took them home and kept them as pets. I’ve been following the Duck Sanctuary site and asked Matt to keep me apprised if he hears anything. I’d have taken them some carrots (even canned/sliced as I buy sodium free) had I known.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Well,It looks like your gang just got bigger! be thankful there aren’t hundreds of Canada geese around!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, pretty soon I can take geese, ducks and squirrels off my income tax as dependents if I keep this up! I’m glad the geese population at this park is 40-50 at the most and that is rare if they all show up at the same time. The rest of the time they hang out in groups of ten.

      Like

  12. Great post Linda, love the photo of the Mallard duck with the squirrel. A meal together.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Laurie says:

    Wow! Too bad you can’t claim those waterfowl as dependents for your tax return as well as the squirrels you support. I didn’t realize squirrels would eat breakfast cereal, but it makes sense. The photos of Puff munching on Puffs are great! I am an oatmeal-lover myself, but I don’t eat it as much now that I am avoiding sugar. I can’t eat oatmeal without a little brown sugar. I hope your cracked corn strategy works with the waterfowl. Happy walking!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I should claim them as dependents – that’s for sure. How about a little almond milk on your oatmeal Laurie? Just a little touch of sweetness for you? I used to use syrup but eliminated it due to all the sugar – it has a ton of sugar in it. So I just use raisins and hulled sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds instead.

      Like

  14. peggy says:

    Wow this must be four posts in one. It’s fun to feed all the little creatures of the world. I loved the photo of the duck and squirrel together. Nature walks are so enjoyable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Peggy – I intended to use the cereal photos as a separate post, then the geese and ducks intrusion happened, so I combined them into one large post. I am long-winded 99% of the time. 🙂 I have some photos of Mute Swans catching fish which was fun to watch but they will be Monday’s post. Nature walks are so enjoyable and like your photos, are fun to share. I followed you because your comments on Andy Finnegan’s posts were so similar to my impressions.

      Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Thanks Linda. Native thrills me. I do like Andy’s posts. Its fun to see different birds and animals that we do not have in America. Waiting for that Monday post of yours. We get the Trumpeter swans here.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, he has such a wide variety of birds and critters in his posts and has branched out with the trail cameras since the pandemic began. We have Trumpeters here, but not too many. The Mute Swans are beautiful, but actually considered an invasive species here in Michigan.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Have seen a lot of different large birds migrate over our house every year. Did capture storks and white pelicans flying over as well as snow geese and canadian geese. The Trumptered swans visit our ponds here in Arkansas from September to February. I venture up by Heber Springs, Arkansas to capture pictures of the swans. Arkansas is a beautiful state. I have been close to Michigan, but have never been in your stare.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I may have visited Arkansas when I was very young as we drove to Oklahoma when my father had a job interview there. I lived in Canada until I was ten, then my father was transferred from Ford-Oakville to Ford-Woodhaven and we moved here to Michigan in 1966. I have heard Arkansas was beautiful. A fellow blogger/photographer has featured photos of white pelicans on her blog. They used to come to feed every morning at a lake near her home. I never knew they existed and thought there were only brown pelicans. We do get some migrating raptors in the Fall months and they pass over Lake Erie Metropark where I often walk. From October – December birders gather every day, weekends are especially busy, to watch the migration and they have an official counter. I will tell you that I have gone multiple times and seen no migrating raptors, but I’m limited to going on weekends due to work. I even took a two-hour cruise devoted to eagle sighting in October – just saw turkey vultures!

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        I was raised in the Western U.S. My father was a welder who followed construction. By the time I graduated from high school
        we had lived in twenty places. I loved moving – I saw things a lot of people did not get to see. Sounds like you got to do the same. I joined the Air Force when I got out of high school and ended up in Texas and Illinois. The white pelicans come from Canada to Lakre Conway in cental Arkansas. I did a post on them last year. I never knew they existed until last year either.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That is interesting you lived in so many places Peggy and it was good for you because you became more adaptable to each different place you lived. My father was a tool-and-diemaker. He actually promised my mom we would stay just ten years, then return home to Canada, but that didn’t happen. I have no family there (or here for that matter) and am still a Canadian citizen, despite living here for ten years. I’m glad I’m not the only person who had never seen or heard of a white pelican.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Such an interesting life you lived. I met my husband when we were both in the Air Force. We lived on the Navaho Indian reservation in Arizona for 18 years after we got out of the service. Then like all Arkie my husband had to move back to his home state. Life has been interesting for me for sure.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think your life has been more exciting than mine, both being in the service and on an Indian reservation. I would like to travel more in the United States. We did some traveling in the U.S. when we lived in Canada and after we moved here as well. I actually have not any of Canada, just the Toronto area where I’m from. I used to travel with tour groups in the late 70s/early 80s as none of my friends were interested in traveling, so I went myself, but I’ve not been on any trips since then. I hope to travel again once I am retired, but domestic trips only and it really depends on what happens with this pandemic aftermath. If it doesn’t happen, I’m fine with that too – I’m looking forward to having more free time mostly.

        Like

      • peggy says:

        We use to travel with our RV all over the West. We don’t do much traveling anymore. My husband turned 84 on Friday. He is a lot like Ann Marie. He has COPD and he just keeps on going. I would like to travel, but like you – if I din’t that is fine.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Ann Marie’s husband also has COPD and will turn 84 on Elvis birthday. You and she has some similarities. He is not active as much now though – she does all the errands/running around and work in the apartment. Travel was different back when we did it – there’s too many worries now with COVID and even in a post-COVID era. And just too much unsettledness in the world right now. I’m content to stay put and just venture out on a daily basis.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Hmm Ann Marie and I do sound like we have much in common. It is better to stay home until covid is gone. People just don’t realize covid is still raging.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes you do Peggy – interesting similarities. I always buy my pantry purchases in bulk every September-October so I don’t have to go to the grocery store all Winter even before the pandemic. I never went to a store or anywhere else for that matter for four months (November 23rd until mid-March) when I finally ventured out for perishables. I resumed getting allergy shots too. I had told the allergist I wasn’t going out except to walk and shovel. It makes me nervous and I don’t think we’ll get to herd immunity as too many people aren’t going to get the shot. That’s too bad. as COVID will linger on.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        We are still very careful about venturing out. We definitely will not get to herd immunity, because too many refuse the vaccine. We go to wal mart to shop at 7:00 a.m. every other week. Get in and out of the store in 30 minutes. I think everyone should continue to wear masks and be very careful.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I will continue to wear my mask, even at the Park, where they say we can now go if alone and no crowds. I have worn a mask all along in public and the mask does not bother me but had some issues in the Winter, despite using a product called “Fog Away” … my glasses still fogged up. I only go to the store during the week too now that I am back to going on a more regular basis – early and out ASAP. No mingling and yes, too many people are even refusing to get their part 2 shot now. I heard the stats on that fact today. (P.S. – I wonder where our friend Andy has been? No posts which is unusual for him.)

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Yes we should all continue to use our masks = which certainly can fog up my glasses now and then. Was thinking about Andy yesterday – wonderig where he disappeared to.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        In the Winter it was a problem for walking as I was concerned about sliding on the ice. I started leaving the mask under my chin while walking the mile through the neighborhood, then only sliding it up if I saw someone. I have been wearing a double mask if I go to the store and won’t touch my face mask if I’ve been out mingling with people. I have been overly cautious. I just hopped onto Reader and he has a post but didn’t read it, but he said he’s been away. You really notice if someone who posts daily is gone.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        I also have done the double mask thing. Yes, I saw Andy’s post, but have not read it. Hear these storms coming our way right now. It cuts out my sattelite signal out here in the country for awhile.when storms pass by.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I will continue to do it when going to the store or anywhere but the Park. There no one masks up but I just do it … not a big deal, especially now that Winter is over. Was your storm any part of that bad storm that hit Texas earlier today? I heard about it on the national news on the radio.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Lots of rain here, but no problem in our area. Bad flooding North of us and one tornado in the North West corner of the state.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am glad you remain unscathed by the bad weather Peggy. A local meteorologist here in the Detroit area has been warning of climate change and its resulting volatile weather. Since the July 16, 1980 derecho that hit Michigan and part of Illinois, I’ve worried more about severe weather. I saw the damage though we only experienced the grass flattened down in the front and back yards as the winds raged through. At the end of the street, which is a highway, all the saplings, that were fairly newly planted, were blown down but not uprooted. The City had to remove all of them a they were damaged. The sky turned an awful shade of green. I am going to get a bicycle helmet. The same meteorologist suggested not only going to the basement, but a good idea to have head protection.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Yes, the weather is changing and not for the better.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I got caught in the rain – rain wasn’t to arrive until after 10:00 and it started while I was at the Park and I had a mile to walk home. That’s okay, I am not made of sugar. We were supposed to have high winds today, but that kind of fizzled out – that’s okay too.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Ha – glad you are not made of sugar. Getting caught in the rain use to be fun when I was younger. Our weatherman is usually wrong about our weather a lot of the time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes it was fun! Some of our weather folks are not as accurate as the Accuweather where they predict 7 days a week electronically.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Such a sweet post Linda ❤

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s