Busy as a ….? #Wordless Wednesday #This eager beaver has sharp teeth!

#Wordless Wednesday – allow your photo(s) to tell the story.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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33 Responses to Busy as a ….? #Wordless Wednesday #This eager beaver has sharp teeth!

  1. Sandra J says:

    Amazing how they do that, quite the teeth they have, 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it’s amazing Sandra. I would have loved to see one, but none came out while I was walking around, this time or the last time when there was a whole area of nothing but beaver chews.

      Like

  2. bekitschig says:

    What a good boy! (There is this beaver cartoon who advertizes toothpaste in Germany for decades 😉 Must be good chompers)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I love the cartoon Jeanine – those pearly white teeth, all the better for felling trees! Thanks for sharing. 🙂 It is amazing to see what the beavers can do – this post was just a small sampling and I included the tree that fell after they chewed it all the way through. Just amazing!

      Like

  3. Ally Bean says:

    Wow. Huh. That looks like something I’d see in a cartoon, yet it’s real.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………………did you just take these pictures??………………so it’s in the springtime that beavers build their dams…………………………….you’re a good “wordless” storyteller…………..besides using words!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Ann Marie – glad you enjoyed the pictures. No, I saw some beaver chews at Lake Erie Metropark in a different area. I took these pics on the first day of Spring, the day II saw the beautiful reflections.

      Like

  5. Joni says:

    Oh my, he has been a busy little beaver! Too bad he didn’t come out for a photo-op!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Can you believe the destruction? This was in several places and the last photo was a tree that fell over after he chewed all the way around. Timber!!! Perhaps I should have called out that I was a Canadian and he might have put in an appearance?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        HA! I’ve never even seen a beaver either, nor an eagle, nor an owl….a long list of critters who make themselves scarce!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Scarce and/or camera shy? I didn’t realize beavers were nocturnal – that explains why the only critter I see in the water at the bigger parks and at Council Point Park is a muskrat.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I didn’t know that either – but I’ve never seen a beaver dam either, so I think they must be scare around here as we don’t have many woodlands.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’ve only seen the damage twice and I saw the dam last time but couldn’t get near. I need to go back and see if I can see a dam. We had rain twice today plus with the snow melt, it won’t be good to go back there as that trail is usually muddy. I am going to try somewhere different tomorrow and hope it’s not a muddy mess.

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  6. Wow — that was some pretty impressive grinding work!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Just amazing to see Barbara! And, the last picture, he actually had felled that tree as the places where the stump had been gnawed exactly matched the tree trunk that had fallen over into the water.

      Like

      • It’s amazing that they can chew the trunk so that when it falls it lands where they want it go. It looks like he might be thinking of starting a new dam there?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was wondering the same thing Barbara and I had an excellent view of the fallen tree, but couldn’t tell … I hope the trail is not flooded or muddy so I can check it out because last year when I posted beaver chew pictures, I could not get near where I could see the dam and this was a good view, and no worries about ticks in long grass as it was right on the path. Bold critter!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Impressive tree stumps! We have some beavers at the park here too, but since they’re nocturnal I doubt I’ll ever see one. How long did it take for them to fell the trees?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, they sure are destructive aren’t they? I don’t know how long it took them to do this damage and fell that tree in the last picture as the trail has been so muddy I’ve not been on it in about two years. So the last time I was here, there was no damage there. I’d was curious and Googled and found this info (though they don’t mention the diameter of the tree): a lone beaver is capable of felling an 8-foot tree in 5 minutes. Wow! I had no idea. P.S. – I didn’t know they were nocturnal. Perhaps they wouldn’t get away with all that destruction if people were around.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I was surprised to read that it takes them no time at all to fell a tree. But than again, those teeth look like they can chomp off anything.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, they are lethal looking. I saw a video of a beaver making a dam, but it did not show the chewing of the tree. I have to say I had only seen the beaver chewing on trees in a cartoon. When I saw the damaged trees two years ago I was just astounded. I don’t know why the parks do not do something to protect the trees – there must be a collar of some type or find something to repel the beavers without hurting them would be easier.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Beaver are in the rodent family and therefore have to keep their front teeth from getting too long. I don’t know what could be done to prevent damage. I don’t know how I feel about it, we need trees and beavers have their place in the environment too.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, that is true Sabine. I see many trees being cut down and usually reduced to mulch for that park’s mulched trails or garden beds. I wonder if it has to be fresh wood for the beaver to keep those teeth from getting too long. The wood pulp might have to be fresh for the gnawing process. I know it is a problem with squirrels as well – I have seen recommendations for squirrels that are being rehabbed by Good Samaritans that nurse them back to health to ensure hard tree nuts are provided to keep the ever-growing teeth whittled down. Especially if they don’t go outside and would be eating bark to help the process.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Wow so much damage by those little critters! It takes years for the trees to go and they are gone in a matter of minutes!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      That’s amazing isn’t it? I had not been on this trail for about two years as it was alternately water logged or very muddy. So it was nice to walk here and I saw this damage right away. I had no idea how quickly they chewed the trees down until Sabine, a fellow blogger mentioned how quickly they destroyed trees – I Googled and it said one beaver can fell an eight-foot tree in five minutes. I had no idea!

      Like

  9. Laurie says:

    Oh, so cool! I hope you get to see the beavers who were working so hard and share photos with all of us!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Wow, that beaver was on a chewing mission! I didn’t know they could chew so well. Thanks for sharing the pics because I never would’ve known if I saw one.
    Have a great start to the weekend and stay well!

    Liked by 1 person

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