National Trails Day 2021 – Part I

Saturday, June 5th was designated as “National Trails Day” so of course I had to do my part to celebrate! I walked six miles on my two morning meanders, first at Lake Erie Metropark, then later that morning at Humbug Marsh. Today’s post will focus on Lake Erie Metropark.

It was the first time back to this venue since early Spring when I saw the beautiful reflections on the water, the Canada goose sitting on the nest and the gander defending her honor. You may recall I showed you some photos of a few trees felled by destructive beavers. So I hoped this walk would be as enjoyable and picturesque as last time.

In early June, all of Michigan was classified as being in moderate drought. That classification was wiped out shortly thereafter as a result of multiple, all-day rains, then later in the month, some torrential downpours so severe that flash flooding in homes and expressways occurred. Unbelievably, over one thousand vehicles were left abandoned and bobbing around on the interstate after 6.8 inches of rain fell in 24 hours. You most likely saw those “once-in-500-years-rain event” photos of the Detroit area that made the national news.

A brief marsh meander, then onto the trails.

It was very muggy and humid so I left early in the morning. I take the same route each time I visit this park. I began my walk near the boathouse where I stopped to say “hi” and visit with Luc, the resident eagle.

Then I strolled over to the boathouse, just a few yards away.

The boathouse sits on a wooden overlook in the marsh. I mused that the boathouse was the same putrid green color as the murky marsh, which was filled with pond lilies, the invasive aquatic plant Frogbit and slime … lots of slime. Ugh.

Everything was very still as I gazed out across the murky-looking marsh, trying to decide if the scene warranted a photo or not, when suddenly I heard a booming voice. I nearly flew out of my skin to discover a huge bullfrog, immersed in Frogbit right beneath the overlook. Now THAT warranted taking a photo or two or ten and I’ll feature Mr. Bullfrog in my upcoming Wordless Wednesday post.

Photo-wise, pickin’s were kind of slim at the marsh.

A Great Blue Heron waded, intermittently watching the water intently for its breakfast.

That heron was spooked by the camera clicks, or maybe just skittish from seeing me and it soon took off, landed, then regally posed on an abandoned Canada goose nest.

A Mama mallard raced through the thick and sludgy-looking marsh, her ducklings paddling as fast as they could to keep up with her. There were a lot of twists and turns as she led the procession and I worried she might lose one or two as they traversed the murky water.

The fuzz was flying off the Poplar trees – it was everywhere. In this photo, the fuzz had glommed onto a sticky spider web. It covered the marsh in some areas.

There was nothing more to see, so I left and headed for the trail, fingers crossed that the Cherry Island Trail was not flooded.

All you need is one good rain, notwithstanding the aforementioned drought-like conditions and that trail is awash in mud and pools of water spilling onto the trail which runs parallel to the Lake Erie shoreline.

Once enroute to the boat launch area, I was all eyes and ears.

Fellow walker Arnie, from Council Point Park, told me he was riding his bike on the trail earlier in the week and saw a doe, a Bald Eagle and a large contingent of Great Egrets, so I was hopeful.

I stepped onto the overlook where there was more Poplar fuzz.

The marsh was dried up and the reeds, deprived of water, looked like straw. The scene looked like it might in late Winter/early Spring.

As I walked along, the only sign of life were many Red-Winged Blackbirds flitting from stalk to stalk, perching precariously on the dry reeds. This one flew to a tree, so I quickly got a photo.

Down at the boat launch area, there were no seagulls or fishermen – not even a boat. I wouldn’t think the heat would be the reason for the no-show, but it was strange nonetheless.

Poplar fuzz had accumulated along the grassy area making it look like snow.

A dragonfly zoomed by and landed at my feet, so I took that as a sign it wanted its picture taken.

I saw a young man on a mountain bike headed toward the Cherry Island Trail and just as I neared that trail, he quickly turned around and came back. I said “just as I suspected” and he said “yep, not going to risk getting my tires stuck in that muck and mire.” So much for that … the rain we’d had days before messed up the trail.

I returned on the same route I took and was disappointed that I had no deer sightings and where were those Egrets Arnie mentioned? Oh yes, a turtle was hanging out on a log.

A little marsh madness.

I walked along the trail, still looking around, when suddenly there was a huge splash in the marsh to my right. I hurried over and decided that the ripples in the water meant a critter, rather than a carp, was beneath the water, so I decided to stay and check it out. Something dark passed under the water’s surface. Hmm.

Lots of bubbles and splashes, but nothing emerged.

After twenty minutes, I figured Nessie wasn’t there, nor was any critter in the mood to give me a photo op, so I moved on. A couple of fishermen came around the bend and one, noting the camera, asked if I got any great shots and I said “not really, but a doe or a fawn would make my day.” The fisherman smiled and said “well, you just missed a doe, not a minute ago – it crossed right in front of us!”

I walked back to the car, checked the pedometer and had walked almost four miles. I thought about driving across the park to Cove Point, but decided to head to Humbug Marsh instead. That second walk on National Trails Day will be next Monday’s post.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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52 Responses to National Trails Day 2021 – Part I

  1. Michael says:

    Wow they’re amazing trsils!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sandra J says:

    You have so many wonderful places to visit Linda, the parks are amazing in your area. And that was another dragonfly I have never seen. So many different kinds of those.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, you’re right about that Sandra. There are state parks, metroparks and various city parks … you will never get bored with all of them. That’s the first time I saw a green dragonfly. They usually just have the Blue Dashers so this was a first for me too.

      Like

  3. I’ve never seen poplar fuzz like that! The dried up marsh is sad too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      This one photo just looks like snow. You have to rinse the A/C grille two or three times during the time the fuzz is flying if it’s warm enough to run the A/C. I’ve not been back since we had all the rain. We had 15 inches of rain from June 15th to July 15th when they gave that record rainfall statistic, plus we’ve had two or three torrential rainfalls since then. So it floods the trails, but at least maybe the marsh greens up again.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. J P says:

    You have proved again that there is lots to see all around us, if only we will see it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      JP – I have to say that Michigan does have a lot of trails and it is known as the trails state with more than 13,000 miles of trails. There is a trail that is still a work in progress that goes from the Western tip of the Upper Peninsula to the Detroit area (Belle Isle) and it is 2,000 miles long. It is for biking and hiking. If you had the time and inclination, how fun it would be to go on that journey!

      Like

  5. Great place Fantastic green dragonfly

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You’d like it Andy, many marsh areas and if you’re lucky a chance to see some shorebirds. This has been the only dragonfly for me this Summer. They usually just have the Blue Dasher variety, so this was an oddity – it matched the green in the marsh and that big bullfrog.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. You get your money’s worth when you set out on these jaunts. Thanks for all my armchair entertainment.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Loved the lucky great blue heron sighting! Everything looked so sticky, slimy, mucky and fuzzy that day. The green dragonfly was dazzling! Hmmm… wonder what all that commotion in the water was all about… Well done on the four miles! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, that was lucky Barbara and it was hard to follow that heron to get a closer shot, as he got skittish every time we made eye contact and finally took off for that goose nest (or it might be a muskrat lodge – not sure; I put goose nest to be on the safe side). The marsh water was awful … you are right about the description everywhere you looked. Would you have hung around hoping for something to pop out of the water too? There were significant splashes whatever it was. At this park there are mink which are often spotted and photographed on local nature sights … I’ve never seen one, but I took one of the park’s interpretive cruises and they mentioned mink and had a show-and-tell of a stuffed one (which I did not want to look at nor touch thank you very much). Yes, four miles, then on to Wildlife Refuge, next Monday’s post.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Ally Bean says:

    You have nice trails to walk. I can understand why you are inclined to visit this park. I like your photo of Poplar fuzz. I immediately flashback to being a little girl and playing with the stuff at my grandpa’s house. Guess he must have had a Poplar tree.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      That was the last time I have visited this venue Ally. We’ve had six weeks of rain, sometimes torrential, and it floods badly, like all the shoreline parks. The poplar fuzz is always extreme at this park and it literally looked like snow in some parts and is fun to photograph. Glad it brought back some nice memories for you.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………….that is an interesting blog today…………………….you write so well. I feel like I’m right there with you as you are clicking away…………………………I never see any turtles where we are……………………………….my husband and I bought a turtle and wrote it’s name on the shell: “Rosie”…………………………..but we never saw her again………………………….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Ann Marie and thank you for the compliment. I take the same route each time and afterward usually drive clear across the park to Cove Point where I know you and Steven sometimes go, but it was so hot that morning, I opted just to go to Humbug Marsh instead. I am guessing “Rosie” stayed at the pond? I had a turtle years ago, a small Red-Eared Slider which had a bowl and a short ramp it would crawl up on … my mom threatened me that both Myrtle and I would go if she found him walking around the house.

      Like

  10. Prior... says:

    Oh I enjoyed this / always love your play on words – like Marsh Madness! Ha
    And the down view of the poplar fuzz really lets us feel what it is like on the trail! So gentle and almost looks like smoke – and such a natural feel of it nestled on the planks – good capture there and throughout the post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Yvette – yes, there I was waiting forever to see what creature of the lagoon would surface, all for a photo op for this post … I decided “Marsh Madness” would be perfect for that portion of the post. After I left this venue, I went to Humbug Marsh and I saw some splish-splashing there too, but there I did see what it was and got a photo. That will be next Monday’s post. That fuzz is incredible to see – not only does it drift lazily across the sky at this venue and the park where I walk daily, but it is amazing to see the thick carpet that is created where you can’t even see the grass.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. you really should look into being the Parks Ambassador Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Laurie says:

    Even though you said the pickins were slim, you managed to get some good ones. Congrats on your 6-miler. That must help towards your yearly goal. I wonder what the critter was who never surfaced. We had an alligator captured in the Susquehanna near our home a few weeks ago. It was a pet that escaped, but it was over 4 feet long. He would give you quite a start if you found him while kayaking or canoeing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Laurie – guess I won’t set out with a critter list to see and photograph and then be pleasantly surprised … that was Arnie riding his bike there a few days before gave me great expectations. It was odd about the creature in the marsh – it was big, whatever it was. I was hoping for some shots to use a subtitle “Nessie Found” or “Creature from the Green Lagoon” … wait until next Monday’s post. Another creature was flip-flopping around when I went to Humbug Marsh just an hour later. An alligator would give you a start if it bumped up under a kayak or canoe-yikes! How is Colorado?

      Like

  13. ruthsoaper says:

    Even though you didn’t get your deer pictures you did get some nice shots. I especially love the dragonfly and the turtle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ruth. I don’t know where the deer go when I’m looking for them! The only time I seem to see them is if I am driving in or out of the Park and they’re crossing the road and I can’t stop. That dragonfly was a nice surprise. Usually the Blue Dashers are there flitting around the marsh, but since there was not much of a marsh since it was all dead, there was no activity. I need to go back to see the water lotuses in August. At least you can see them without worrying about flooding on the trail. That turtle was basking in the sun, carefree and knowing no humans could get near him where he was.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        I see a lot of dragon flies and damsel flies but haven’t seen any green ones.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        He sure stood out on the ground too – he was resting as I never saw him flitting around. It’s been a strange Summer, not only for weather, but for bugs and butterflies. I’ve not seen a single butterfly and have gone to the volunteer garden where they have the Lantana which the Swallowtails and Monarchs love and never saw a butterfly, nor at the Park either. It’s not like it was not hot enough for butterflies!

        Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        We have butterflies and some other unusual pollinators (wasp type) that I have not seen before.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        At the Park where I walk daily, the thistles aren’t out yet … maybe once those purple flowers are out that will help entice the goldfinches (which I hear but don’t see) and the butterflies.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Joni says:

    They were still lovely pictures even if you didn’t get to see the doe, bald eagle or flock of egrets. That shot of the Blue Heron with the wings is great – you don’t often see one with it’s wings spread out like that. I went to our little animal farm on Monday searching for ducks but the gate was closed, and from what I could see of the water and pond area it was the same murky green, so thick it almost looked like a field of grass.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Joni – I went to Humbug Marsh and saw an egret right afterward. They are not as common as herons … the wingspan on the heron is so big for such a scrawny-looking bird. I will do that post for Monday. He was spooked and flew off, like the heron. The water at the Ecorse Creek had such green scum on it before we had the last two torrential storms, it was also as green as grass and I wonder how the ducks and other waterfowl go through it and don’t get sick. Are you hearing about the red tide algae bloom in Florida on your news? They get it every year, but it is worse this year due to the extreme heat. I sure believe the story you told me the other day about the climatologist saying it only gets worse from here. I continue to ponder a backyard garden down the road and whether to invest the time and effort into one again even though I’d have more time … a month of drought, two months of torrential rain … is there no happy medium anymore?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I just finished reading a New York Times article, re summer as we know it is over. Here’s the link:
        https://ca.news.yahoo.com/end-summer-weve-known-181857950.html
        That was the first I had heard of the red algae problem. I wouldn’t bother trying to restore your garden, unless you enjoy that kind of work. It’s too much work. Just put some easy care stuff in. That’s mostly what I have. My Knock-out roses are in their second bloom now and look great. We’ve had so much rain I’m still harvesting lettuce from the garden. I’m behind in Reader so I’d better get to it….

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Joni – thanks for this link. It’s very sobering isn’t it? They’re right about it essentially being a double whammy year from the resurgence of COVID by the Delta variant and this series of horrid weather events. But how incredible how they show in the future just how hot it will be and how unnatural that will be. I often wish I had been born earlier, in an era that did not move so fast, was simpler, just like your blog.
        We took all that fine weather for granted – we enjoyed distinct seasons growing up. You are right about the garden … had I kept it up all these years, if not disillusioned by the loss of so many perennials and my butterfly garden totally wiped out as a result of the back-to-back Polar Vortexes, I’d make it special again. That’s a lot of effort, plus expense. I had already decided that any perennials either have to be purchased for growing zones that are colder than mine to ensure they will thrive, but now it looks like you must have perennials that are drought tolerant too For now, all I have left, besides some evergreens, a Golden Vicary bush and some barberry bushes, are three large and two small rosebushes, one light purple clematis and the two hydrangeas. The rest are silk – they look good, no matter the weather. I even took in my hummingbird feeders, as constant rain diluted the nectar and constant heat, despite using the nectar defender drops to keep it from spoiling, I saw no hummingbirds, so two weeks ago I brought them both in. I’ve taken some yard decor into the garage due to the Asian Tiger Mosquito as I don’t want water sitting out enticing these moquitos, then worrying about Zika virus. We waited for our retirement and our golden years will not be spent as we imagined, that’s for sure. Then hearing today that the Delta variant is as contagious as chickenpox … I’ll go to start getting as many groceries as I can load in before the anticipated onslaught of cases this Fall. Very disheartening. Your mom likely will be relegated to short outdoor trips with you in the car for a drive; nothing more.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I agree it is depressing. I thought I might travel a bit in my Golden Years, (which are officially arriving next month, along with a government check) but how long will it be before we feel safe to travel, if ever? I’ve taken mom shoe-shopping this week and today we went in search of socks and underwear but just one store, with no luck I might add. I’ve warned her, if she wants to do anything or go anywhere we have to do it in August, before the fall surge. Case counts here are good, 1 or 2 new ones a day, six active cases in total, no one in hospital, no deaths recently, (although we have 5 deaths last month – one was in their 90’s, one in 80’s, one in 70’s, plus one 53 yr old and one in their 20’s! The health unit doesn’t provide enough data IMO. Are these people who got Delta? Were they vaccinated?) I didn’t think the Zika virus had come this far north? My brother is coming for a visit next week, and I’m a bit worried about that too, although cases Toronto way are low too. We have not seen him in over a year and a half, as he was out west, so it will be nice for my mom.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes – very depressing. Like you, I thought my Golden Years, post retirement, would be something to look forward to on many levels – instead those different levels of enjoyment seem to be slowly eroding away. Tonight, as I sit here, nodding off from three hours of yardwork (pulling weeds, trimming/pruning) after a nearly six-mile walk, I think I never factored in getting older. I think of trips in the late 70s/early 80s with endless energy. A different venue and vacation might be different though. At least your mom got out and it’s good you suggested you do all those things now – it is very worrisome and on the news today, mentioning how even with the two vaccines, you could still get sick and it is NOT unusual at all. They are saying “sick” would be like a routine cold, but as communicable as the chicken pox. Great. You go to your errands and just get it done and get home again. I’m debating to changing my dental appointment/cleaning to September from October. COVID/Delta variant monopolizes the news here as it all ramps up again – in some respects they say it is as bad as this time last year. I took a long walk this morning at Lake Erie Metropark and stayed on the paved path on the other side of the park (it’s five miles square) to avoid mosquitoes in the swampy areas – so didn’t see any bugs but kept checking my socks and shoes for ticks trying to hitch a ride. That will be a nice visit for your mom – he will stay at your mom’s house then?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Yes, he will stay at my mom’s and just use a separate bathroom etc. It should be okay, and if not now when, as I expect the fall will be worse. I know my energy level is not fit for traveling anymore, not with a tour bus and a different city every day, unless I just book something and take shorter day trips. You must be exhausted weeding and walking. I ran around doing errands today again, why is it so hard to find plain white ankle socks. All the stores have is those short ones you can’t see as they disappear into your shoes. I know I can find them online, but I want to feel the material for comfort and softness. It’s so frustrating…..

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well it was not hot yesterday and that made all the difference in the world because coming home after being in the heat and humidity is worse. I had to do the weeds because they were everywhere. I had pulled out a few tall ones that you could see from the sidewalk, but I usually keep the little ones in the mulch down but turning over the mulch with the hand rake, but I hadn’t even done that. And I took the hummingbird feeders down, so had two empty hooks there. It looked bad. But something nice happened yesterday. I was leaving the park and I saw a Mama deer and fawn. The mom ran off into the bushes and the fawn stayed and I got a lot of pictures and will use 5-6 for Wordless Wednesday. That made my day because at the end of walking, I was thinking “ugh, I have to go home and pull weeds and prune”. So that made it a little better. That made my day as it was a difficult week, workwise we’ve been really busy and the two severe storm episodes (even though the second one didn’t materialize) were wearing me down. I just did that post and finished tomorrow’s post. I think our energy level would not be the same either and I still think it would be nice to visit France and Italy and take day trips. I kind of like the idea of that train trip that Dave mentioned in a recent post. I’ve looked at train trips for the east coast during Fall foliage time. Beautiful and you stay in the train, looking out for the view and get out in the little towns. I’ve never been to Cape Cod or any of the east coast, just New York. Likely have to Rockefeller’s granddaughter to afford it though. I buy my walking socks at Meijer … they have the quarter socks and the ankle size. I used to buy Thorlo walking socks but they were becoming too thick in my shoes. The socks I bought are Medipeds and I have bought them at Amazon too because Meijer is often out – they are in a three-pack. They are for diabetics so have a non-binding top and are very comfortable and soft, so that’s why I like them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        That’s wonderful. I’ve never seen a deer or fawn up close. Have you? I saw one bounding across the road once but just the back end of him crossing a field. I’d love to Cape Cod too. I’ve seen the bus tours of Cape Cod/Nantucket/Martha’s Vineyard but wonder if it wouldn’t be better just to rent something, as you get stuck doing some stuff you have no interest in like visiting a cranberry bog. It’s the water/beach I want to see. We can dream…. I used to see those non-binding diabetic socks all over the place but not anymore. I have a few more stores I can scope out, maybe a home health store the next time I’m doing errands which won’t be for awhile. I hate to just order socks online because of the shipping charge and prefer to see how soft they are. It was certainly brisk walking after supper tonight – I had to put on a hoodie.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was thinking something like Cape Cod would probably be walkable and maybe day trips would be good. The train trip appealed to me for seeing the colors since New England is so popular for the “leaf peepers” (*as they call the people who go to see the leaves), but I guess the crowds would probably be just as bad as Summer crowds. Yes, dream on, unless you don’t go at a prime time of year. I once had a boss who was from Massachusetts and she wanted to get married there, though she went to law school here and lived here. So I was invited to the wedding and quite a few of the young attorneys were going and sharing cars and sharing rooms, but it would have been awkward so I didn’t go. She had real New England-type festivities planned like a lobster fest and a clambake and it did sound fun.
        I just looked for the socks and looks like Walmarts sells them – so maybe you could try there. They are very soft and wash up nicely. I wear the quarter socks in Summer and the the crew socks the rest of the year (I think I said “ankle” yesterday – they are the crew socks. It was gorgeous again this morning – I got six miles in and going to try and do that all week but here it’s getting warmer on Thursday. The one meteorologist I follow said next week starts another run of hot and humid weather – he didn’t say volatile weather, but that will happen as it’s going to be in the 90s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I did look at Walmart, and all they had was some store brand called George for both underwear and socks? I think Canadian walmart might be different than the US? I hate Walmart and try never to go in there, the stuff is so cheaply made.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well that’s too bad and I don’t go to the Walmart about 4-5 miles from me either. It used to be bad for crimes (purse snatching, hold-ups and the like that I’d see in the local crime forum), so I never go. I like Meijer as they have everything … I can remember maybe 20 years ago, a Saturday was spent running around on errands … grocery store, pharmacy, garden center, hardware store – now you can get everything in one place. I didn’t like it at first, but my grocery store, just a small chain, closed down suddenly in 2006 and I was forced to find another store soon – it was so big with items spread out all over the store, but I’m used to it now, except they are remodeling for the first time since I’ve been going there (15 years) and they won’t have U-scan for unlimited items anymore. Not happy about that as I like to go in the morning before work and I separate all my groceries while I pack.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I forgot to mention the fawn. I have seen deer at Lake Erie Metropark, but when I’m driving. A few years ago, I saw a mom and two fawns in a swampy area. I saw people milling around and went over to look. They were together in a small wooded area, but the swamp and muggy weather caused mosquitoes buzzing everywhere. It was so bad, no one stayed very long, no matter how cute the fawns were. I did see a fawn at Algonquin Park many years ago … you can click the photo to make it bigger in this post … I was six years old and feeding it.
        https://lindaschaubblog.net/2013/11/15/heads-up-dear-friends/

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        It’s a cute picture! I don’t understand deer hunting either…..

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thanks! We visited Algonquin Park one time when visiting a friend of the family’s cottage and we stopped there. I’d be just as excited to feed a fawn today. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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