National Trails Day 2021 – Part II

This is Part II of my morning meanders taken June 5th, National Trails Day. You can read Part I here if you missed it.

The power of suggestion … it’s real!

Because I am always obsessed about the weather for my walking agenda, (and in general), I follow several meteorologists and weather sites online, plus listen faithfully to an all-news radio station. In the 6:00 a.m. newscast on June 5th, it was suggested to “go take a hike today for National Trails Day” – then, while scrolling through my Twitter feed, I saw this Tweet by the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge:

So, off I went, notwithstanding the already-stifling temps, in order to garner steps, collect blog fodder and hopefully not melt in the process.

I arrived at the Trenton Gateway portion of the Refuge mid-morning, on the heels of my four-mile meander at the marshes of Lake Erie Metropark. Whew – just as the weather folks predicted, it was “air you could wear” and soon tiny beads of sweat were forming on my brow, as it was a bit of a hike from the parking lot to the start of the trail in the hot sun with no shade. This visit I skipped a stop at the Korneffel Fishing Pier; instead I aimed to concentrate on the Monguagon Delta, perhaps for another up-close glimpse of a heron, then hike through the Old Growth Forest where a deer or an owl would help fulfill my “Critter Photo Bucket List” and also make my day.

It was my first time back to this venue in 2021. I was eager to see how “green” it looked since my previous visits were when the leaf colors were on the wane and the last time was after a dusting of snow. I had high hopes of seeing a colorful array of wildflowers in the wetland areas, especially the prolific blooming Wild Hibiscus or Swamp Rose, which flowers and their abudance had been teased on the venue’s website.

Well this happy wanderer saw NO colorful wildflowers, just a skittish Killdeer walking about, an anxious turtle sunning itself and a Egret enjoying a fish breakfast. Unbelievably, there was no human interaction as I was the only one on the trails and the walkway in the Delta.

Enroute to the Old Growth Forest, I stopped to see the progress of the Visitor Center which was still closed due to COVID at that time, but has since opened. I paused to take some photos of the beach glass that has been embedded at the Center. The mosaic is designed to capture the sun’s rays onto the glass, creating a wavy, ripple effect to resemble the waters of the Detroit River. It’s one of the highlights of the Center and my photos really don’t do it justice.

This turtle blissfully sunned itself on a rock, aah, finally a critter posing for me. I grabbed the camera and got one shot before it heard the shutter click, freaked out and plopped into the water. Guess I do better interacting with squirrels who are eager to provide a pose in exchange for some peanuts.

On the trail at the 300-year old Old Growth Forest.

The long-awaited opening of the Trenton Gateway of the Refuge was in October 2020. With all the years of preparation to ready this newest wildlife venue, I was surprised to see recent photos on their Facebook site of how a torrential rainstorm had wreaked havoc in the wooded area; it was advised to stay away or hike carefully. Large portions of the walkways in the Forest were submerged and the Vernal pools looked like small lakes.

I saw no evidence of water damage and there were NO critters in the woodsy area, unless you want to count these on this cute sign.

There are Eastern Fox Snakes at the Refuge’s Forest area, so most of the time, I avert my eyes to the ground and tread carefully – just sayin’.

I retraced my steps and headed straight for the Monguagon Boardwalk in the Delta by the same name.

Do I dare cross the length of the Monguagon Boardwalk this time?

It was a little windy which gave some cause to pause as the Monguagon Boardwalk across the Delta stretched before me.

As you can see, there is no railing and that makes me a little nervous. Just as I was wavering, in the distance a Great Egret plunged into the Delta and began walking around on its stilt-like legs in search of breakfast. Well, Mr. Egret’s appearance solidified my decision to traipse across, albeit carefully, grab a few shots, then scurry back to land.

I saw some pond lilies as I tread along the walkway and thought it was a tad early for them, but maybe I was confusing them with the exquisite Water Lotuses at Lake Erie Metropark which peak late Summer.

I crept closer to the Egret, as it scanned the water scoping out fish and it was so engrossed in its fishing expedition, it didn’t see me right away. Then Mr. Egret saw me, freaked out and flew away.

It landed on the other side of the Delta … so much for that.

I turned around to begin my perilous journey back (for me anyway), but soon stopped short because the lure of a tasty fish breakfast was just too great to pass up and the Egret returned, plunged into the water and the quest for fish began anew. It was successful as you can see below.

It was all good, me taking pictures, him/her munching on small fish, then I saw something splashing around in the water … “not this again I thought” as it had been just an hour or so before when I wasted my time at the marshy area at Lake Erie Metropark, waiting patiently for a brown something to emerge from the murky waters, after a series of ripples and splashes caught my attention.

Same as before, something loomed large and the water was clear enough that I could see it crisscrossing the Delta. Occasionally it splish-splashed in that split second when it came up for air. I got a little nervous, not only for the camera getting wet from a big splash, but yikes, ever the worrier, I imagined it jumping out of the water, onto the walkway and me recoiling in horror and falling into the Delta.

Just then, whatever sea creature was beneath the walkway had obviously tickled the tootsies of the Egret, who dropped its fish and took off, taking to the skies and getting the heck out of Dodge.

The “sea creature” next leaped out of the water, likely startled by the quick exit of the Egret. I could see it was a huge Carp and, as it swam near the walkway, I got this photo of it, then just like Mr. Great Egret, I got the heck out of Dodge!

As I walked to the car, a Killdeer crossed my path, obviously in a hurry to get somewhere. I wonder who got more steps on this National Trails Day, the Killdeer with its long legs and swift strides … or me, with equally long legs and swift strides? Have you ever seen a Killdeer walking? They sure are on the move!!

I walked six miles altogether after a short hop to Council Point Park to tender peanuts to my furry and feathered friends, I wearily put the car in the garage, glad to be home.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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64 Responses to National Trails Day 2021 – Part II

  1. I’m glad you identified the underwater creature that kept moving under water. A killdeer hadn’t crossed my path in years, so I was happy to see your photo. Lovely post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was really disappointed I couldn’t identify the other underwater creature. This was such a huge Carp and imagine that flip-flopping around? I hear them at Council Point Park in spawning season, but can’t see them through the bushes, just hear them jumping out of the water. Those Killdeer just crack me up the way they walk so quickly on those long legs. They have an unusual call that is very identifiable. I hear it and know they are around.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. That looked like a HUGE carp! I’m also not a fan of walkways with no railings. I get so intense my balance gets wonky.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it was and I imagined it flopping up onto the deck. The tail alone was huge! This Delta is not too deep as the Egret had water to its knees, but maybe deeper other spots, not sure. I went to a lighthouse tour a few years ago – there was a 50-foot pier with no railing over the Detroit River. The lighthouse inside was steep and there was a tour group there who routinely toured lighthouses. They climbed those steep stairs without a problem, me … I felt wobbly and should have asked someone for help going back to shore. I felt kind of silly, as they were all older folks and walked across with ease. Never again. They only offer the lighthouse tour once a year and I was the only one not with the group.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ally Bean says:

    You walked a long way, in my estimation. I like the photo of the south end of a northbound turtle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      You’re right – I did Ally and I wish it had been a day like today where it was almost chilly. We have picture-perfect weather all this week, so it’s a chance to get an extra mile in each morning. I like how you identified that turtle and he was spooked pretty easily so I got one shot and the next instant he was underwater.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Joni says:

    I don’t like to get too close to the water too, esp. if it’s deep. It was an enjoyable trip Linda but you must have been exhausted from the heat! I don’t think I’ve ever seen a killdeer and didn’t realize they were so striped.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      PS. That beach glass was interesting too…but not sure about the colors? It would have been lovely all done in blues….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was really hot that day – I had taken a screen shot of the weather temps/humidity that morning, but the post had so many pictures, I left it out. We had several drowning deaths over this past weekend and one was a fireman, who was skilled in water rescue, but he drowned. And, this’ll scare you … a man mowing his lawn, his hat flew off and floated on top of a pond. He died trying to retrieve the hat. We had a fire chief do that a few years ago too – his hat blew off and he went in after it … drowned. They have a lot of killdeer at this park … I recognize their call before I see them. I think they are pretty and if they have a nest, they build it on the ground and deposit the eggs on the ground. If someone comes near the nest, the killdeer feigns a broken wing to divert the human’s attention. They walk so fast on those long legs, so they are comical to watch them stride.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        That’s very tragic…..why would someone skilled in water rescue drown? Was there a bad undertow? I hate hearing all those weekend drowning reports – we get them here too, esp. the long weekends. There’s always someone going in to rescue some kid who ends up drowning themselves….

        Like

      • Linda Schaub says:

        We have that with the people rescuing kids, or rescuing dogs too. And we’ve had a few people blow off piers in the Upper Peninsula. A few years ago, a young man and woman went out on the pier on January 1st … this was not because they were drinking, they were just walking and it was windy and wavy and they got thrust into the water. The girl’s body was recovered many month later. He managed to get out alive. They didn’t mention the water conditions – perhaps if they update the story. It happened very fast.
        https://www.audacy.com/wwjnewsradio/news/local/man-drowns-while-trying-to-retrieve-hat-from-pond

        Like

      • Joni says:

        That’s scary and why I don’t like to go too close to the water’s edge if it’s deep. The poor man’s family – dead all over a hat??

        Like

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I know – as a person who, like yourself, does not know how to swim, if there would be an incident, it is scary.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Your a real Trooper when It comes to walking the Park trails Linda! Many of the animals must be getting to know you by now!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Wayne – I am really wary of the Eastern Fox Snake – they had an event there, maybe the grand opening, and the Congresswoman whose late husband was instrumental in getting this place opened, was startled by a big snake slithering near her feet. I’d have had a heart attack. Ever since reading that story, I spend a lot of time looking at my feet to ensure no snake is in my path. I don’t wanna get snakebit!

      Like

      • You stick to well known trails I assume,which means you may run into an occasional snake sunny themselves. Snakes love getting warm and many times those spots are pathways or roads.
        Being a good photographer your observational skills will spot them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’ve not seen a snake to date and interestingly, on the Refuge’s Facebook site, they posted a photo of an Eastern Fox Snake sunning itself on some gravel. I’ve never encountered a snake, so when I go through the forest of the wetland area, I walk swiftly, eyes to the ground. I wanted to see the Spring Peepers (tiny singing frogs) in the Vernal Pool, but am leery of snakes.

        Like

      • You should learn to walk with a walking stick Linda. It not only is a great aid with your walking but can also be used to protect yourself……whatever that may be? Snakes,dogs,humans.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I know I thought about one time Wayne. I have a friend who lives in New Mexico and walks in the foothills of the mountains there. He said he saw a lot of snakes and took a cane and suggested I do that too. I said I hold onto the camera with both hands or one hand but needed both hands for taking pictures. He suggested a collapsible cane and hang it on a fanny pack.

        Like

      • generally people hike with the walking stick and sling the camera over their neck. When they want to take a picture they put the stick down and use both hands with the camera. With you being alarmed by dogs and violent humans,I would think that having a good walking stick for protection would be something you would want?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It even makes sense in the neighborhood as to vicious dogs … in the neighborhood crime forum I just read about a toy poodle attacked by a pit bull and mauled to death in front of its owner, who tried to rescue it and was attacked as well. I will look into it … I know my friend suggested a collapsible cane to have at the ready and hang off my belt – in the Winter I’d have to have another option.

        Like

  6. The swamp rose mallows are just starting to bloom here so maybe June 5th was too early for them where you are? The beach glass mosaic is very pretty. Love those bright orange chairs looking out over the water. Looks like a great spot to rest and mull things over. Glad the egret lured you out to the boardwalk and gave you a good shot before it spotted you. 😉 I love the pictures of it flying, especially the last one. I agree, those killdeer are always on the move, skittering about here and there, chasing after insects, spiders and earthworms. You got a great picture of the one with his mouth open. Maybe he was hot that day, too? You did well walking so much on such a hot day. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      So, that might be the reason then? I need to make a return trip then. Perhaps I should have made a stop on Saturday morning, or while it is cool this week. I didn’t see any wildflower. The Egret got its shirt in a knot after the Carp touched its feet … I imagined it flip-flopping onto that walkway. This is the Killdeer I mentioned when you had the post with your so close up … it could be why it’s mouth was open. Birds hyperventilate when they get too warm to cool themselves off. I aim for six miles each weekend day if possible … I did six this morning as it was so beautiful out.

      Like

      • I just googled it — apparently they bloom from mid-summer through early autumn. I know your sunflowers bloom at a different time than ours do. All the pictures I have of our local swamp rose mallows were taken in August. Hope you can see them on Saturday! I guess the carp was too big for the egret to eat. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you for Googling it – after you mentioned that I was too early, I wondered if they would tell me if I reached out on their Facebook page. We are in mid-Summer (and though it feels like Fall now – by the weekend, it will feel like the Dog Days of Summer again) so I will definitely try again Barbara. I think that carp got too close the egret and scared it. That tail was massive!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    Great nature shots, Linda. You managed to get some good photos of the egret, even though he was a little skittish. Too bad he lost his breakfast due to the carp splashing.

    You would have gotten some good pictures at my Colorado son’s house. He put out a small plastic pool to provide water for his chickens. He added goldfish to eat the mosquito larvae that began populating the pool. Now garter snakes are attracted to the goldfish. Yesterday morning, there were 6 snakes in the pool!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Laurie – that Egret was skittish for sure, but very hungry as it circled around thinking the human was not going to delay its breakfast. 🙂 The Carp was another story though – that Carp was huge! Oh, that is quite a tale with the garter snakes in the pool. Is Atti scared of the snakes – I hope the snakes didn’t get the goldfish. That would be disheartening for Atti to find – yikes~ How about a small catfish for the bottom – the gold color is not so inviting!

      Like

      • Laurie says:

        Atti is not scared of snakes. He picks them up regularly. The goldfish are too big for the snakes to eat. Ryan has had 1 of the fish for 8 years and he is huge! One of the snakes tried to pull him out of the pool with no success. The snakes mostly leave the fish alone. They just like the water. The catfish is a good idea. He would help to keep the pool clean. I am going to suggest it to Ryan.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Atti is brave. I’m not that brave – so kudos to Atti. I didn’t realize the goldfish were that big. Did you see the stories in the news recently on the extra large goldfish? People have goldfish and decide not to keep them anymore and turn them loose in ponds and they grow very large and invasive, like carp. I’ll put the link in a separate comment for you to read and ask Ryan and Atti if they heard the story. I had no idea they grew that large. This is just people releasing them in the wild. Yes, catfish are always good bottom feeders for aquarium so should help out keeping the pool clean.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Laurie says:

        Thanks for the link. I will pass it along to Ryan. I think goldfish will grow as large as the container they are in. In a small bowl, they will stay small. If you put them in a big aquarium (or a pond), they will grow larger.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You’re welcome Laurie – I learned something from your comment as I didn’t know a goldfish grew to fit its environment. I had a few goldfish as a kid and I won them at the carnival from beanbag toss. I’d be all excited with my goldfish in a Baggie … my mom would say “yes, maybe it was a free fish and you had to pay to win it, but by the time we get all the paraphernalia for it, it won’t be a free fish.”

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Sandra J says:

    I like that sign, Respect our Home, that says it all. Nature needs our help to keep it the way it is intended to be. Wonderful photos Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Dear Miss “Kildeer”……………………………..I thoroughly enjoyed the International Trenton water park today……………………………………………………I’ll have to look up the trails and the Delta bridge………………………………..thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I hope you get to see it Ann Marie – the fishing pier is nice for you and Steven if you still have your gear, but a bit of a walk. Maybe this week as it is nice and cool to Thursday.

      Like

  10. Eilene Lyon says:

    At least you managed to catch a few critters!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes I was lucky Eilene – the last time I was there I wandered into a secluded area near the Delta and saw a heron just a few feet from me. He paid me no mind as he went on fishing and preening, not skittish at all.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Rebecca says:

    You got some fun photos, Linda! As always, I enjoyed your walk.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. ruthsoaper says:

    Wow! Judging from the tail that carp was huge! We often see killdeer running around the farm. They remind me of little roadrunners as fast as they go. It’s even cuter when they have babies and mom and dad are trying to keep track of 3 or 4 little ones running around.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Ruth – I was so glad I got a picture of that carp, even it was just part of it. I could see it moving through the water and could tell it was huge! Roadrunner … thank you. That’s the bird I was trying to compare it to and couldn’t think of the name, so left it out. Their legs are so long and they move so fast … they are funny to see. I’ve only seen pictures of the babies on some nature sites I follow. I’m usually running after a killdeer trying to take a picture of it … this one stopped a few times to catch its breath!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. J P says:

    Photos of carp are a rarity to me, so that one is extra interesting. There were not enough egrets there for that one! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      At Council Point Park, where I walk every day, I often hear the carp jumping out of the water during spawning season. I can’t see them through the bushes, but they make a huge splashing noise. The water is fairly clear at the Delta – the outline of this carp under the water told me it was some type of large sea creature. Even that egret was spooked with the carp in his territory.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. How fun to not only get some shots of the egret, but also of the carp! It looks like it must have been huge! Killdeer are amazing birds. Long ago we had some that would nest in the middle of a big grassy acre. Once the young hatched the parents would try to distract anybody, human and animal alike, from the nestlings by feigning an injury and kind of fly off and away from the nest. It was always interesting to see!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I have heard about the Killdeer doing that for nestlings and even for their eggs. They build the nests on the ground and I was at Heritage Park one day and saw a nest with the brown speckled eggs next to the parking lot and a Killdeer walking by nervously. They sure do have an unusual call don’t they? But my favorite thing is how they walk so fast! That was a huge carp and I’m glad I was able to capture a shot of the tail which gave you an idea why I was nervous to get off that walkway and I’m sure the carp brushed up against the Egret and freaked it out!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Prior... says:

    I live egrets so much and your photos are so nice
    And mr egret must have been startled to drop his fish
    And I have not really seen the killdeer walk but can imagine the th stride – and yours too 😉
    Also
    Smiled with the “cause for pause”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Yvette. I really didn’t want to cross that walkway, even though the water wasn’t deep, but yes “for the cause” I did it. 🙂 The killdeer has extra-long legs and walk extremely fast, the whole time making a noise which sounds like they are crying out “killdeer”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Thanks and he bird sounds can be so interesting
        In California I taught science workshops summer 2002 and one of the owls we taught about said somehow that sounds like “who cooks for you “

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        They sure are – that sounds like an unusual call by that owl. I attended an on-line seminar on birding through bird calls only. The seminar was by the Detroit Audubon Society and the person who put it together has partial hearing loss, but still was able to distinguish the birdsong.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Oh that is so beautiful that he could still hear the bird song

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I know some of the common birds by their song, but not all of them. There is a Goldfinch in the neighborhood as I am walking to/from the Park and I often hear him. He sings his heart out, much like a canary.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Oh that sounds so nice to hear at walking to and from – I think the birds in early spring are some of my fav because I missed the sounds so much over the quiet winter

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, it is so nice to hear Yvette. I have a cardinal who sings his heart out too. He sits on an electrical wire and I often see him and we whistle at one another. Those little tidbits of nature make my day as all too soon, the cold and wintry days will take them from us.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Yes – enjoy it while we can !
        And in my book “avian friends” – which I need to give you one of my extra proof copies one of these days – well in that book I have a small little poem about the first time heating a bird after many cools winter months
        “Hope flew in”

        🎶🎶🎶🎶🎶

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I made the most of my day today Yvette. Left the house early and went to three parks, including a stop at a park that has the “Healing Wall” there for just a handful of days – tomorrow is the end and they pack up to go to Minnesota. I am not going to last too long today as I walked over six miles and was outside for about five hours. That is kind of you. Now that is amazing about the hummingbird flying into the birdbath – you were astonished for sure. It needed some refreshment and a bath after its long migration. I put away my hummingbird feeders a few weeks ago – between the incessant rain diluting the nectar and the very hot days, I had no visitors, not even Hope. So next year I’ll get some baffles, one for each. I put “Nectar Defender” in the nectar to keep it from spoiling but this was just a bad Summer for treating the hummingbirds.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Well maybe Hope will come our way when needed – haha
        And I stopped doing any feeders alt other because it was too much in our yard – and bush boy told me something about not wanting to be the only one in the area with a feeder or is can overwhelm –
        Anyhow – have a great weekend and ttys

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That makes sense Yvette. I saw two other hummingbird feeders in people’s yards near me, but they were never filled, making me think I’d be a hummingbird magnet, but not so. I don’t see any regular bird feeders nor bird baths. My late neighbor Marge and I fed and watered the birds for years and had to stop due to a new neighbor moving in behind our houses and he kept his dog outside 24/7 and it soon brought rats. The pest service said to discontinue everything related to the birds.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        Oh I remember some tidbits of the rats story – and that makes sense to stop –
        the good news is that you see so many Avian Friends while on your walks – 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, they advised no food and especially no water. The rat bait instantly begins drying their internal organs once ingested, so the rat will seek a water source. So no birdbaths. I fed the birds for years and there might have been mice when I was not around, but I never saw them when I was out in the yard. Whatever birdseed was spilled onto the ground, the squirrels and the doves took care of that seed. I also used those Birdola Blocks which they loved. I like feeding the birds at the Park where I walk daily. They see me doling out peanuts or sunflower seeds and come over … I like seeing that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        😊🌸🌺🌸🌺🌸🌺🌸

        Liked by 1 person

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