“Oh, the Places You’ll Go.”

Since we recently enjoyed the holiday season, I decided to push this post ahead of my three November excursions, plus I’m still mindful of that trio of treks to the Ford Estate, same which remain simmering on the back burner. Fingers crossed I’ll finally be posting about treks taken and written in real time once Spring arrives?!

This December 26th walk was a seize-the-day-because-it-is-the-calm-before-the-storm outing as we were slated for a wintry mix of precip to arrive mid-afternoon. We lacked a white Christmas – instead it was pouring raining. I felt rather smug as I had my walking goal locked in place, so I shut off the alarm clock and slept in Christmas morning – a rare treat for me.

But Boxing Day, (the day after Christmas for you non-Canucks), dawned bright and slightly over the freezing mark, so I decided to head out. The traffic reporter cautioned about freezing fog in the southern tier of counties, but I peered out the front door and it looked fine, so I headed out early.

I stopped at Council Point Park for a quick one-mile walk to feed the critters and discovered, just like a few weeks before, a mere mile from my home, freezing fog was glistening on the brittle and curled-up leaves and on the grass. I figured by the time I reached my next destination, it would be fine to walk (or so I thought).

I went gallivanting on Grosse Ile.

I hadn’t visited the Island since March 2020, just prior to when the pandemic lockdown began. That day I took an impromptu trip to look for those tiny singing frogs known as “Spring Peepers” and had no luck finding them, so I went to the alpaca farm to look at those cutie pies instead.

The Grosse Ile Parkway Bridge over the Trenton Channel (a/k/a “The Free Bridge”), was closed since May 2020 and just re-opened on December 3rd. Though it was targeted for re-opening in late 2020, structural problems, including deterioration to the underwater piers, delayed the opening an additional year. For those of you that don’t live in this area, there is a toll bridge available for residents and visitors, costing $5.00 round trip, but the lines were long to get on and off the Island the duration of the closure. In declaring the structure sound and stable once again, the engineers estimated the repairs added 20-30 years of life to this nearly century-old free bridge.

I mused that maybe I’d see a Canada Goose or two for Boxing Day.

I missed two Springtime gosling arrivals at Grosse Ile. The huge and stately homes along East River Road are near the Detroit River’s edge, separated only by that busy street. If you are lucky enough to find a place to park (public parking is a rarity here along the riverfront and trespassing is a big “no- no”), you will see multiple feathered friends, i.e. Mom and Pop Canada Goose guiding their goslings by waddling around homeowners’ lawns, strolling across the busy road, or maybe meandering near the water. So I drove by and found nothing to pique my interest for taking out the camera nor scaring up a parking spot. Next I headed to Horse Mill Road looking for deer – perhaps I’d see a couple of bucks crossing the road like last time. Not a deer to be found.

Two strikes on this excursion thus far, so I made my way back to Meridian Road and decided to visit this 153-acre Open Space woodsy area where I last was looking for Spring Peepers.

Parking is easy-peasy; across the street is the parking lot of Meridian Elementary School.

I parked and headed to the wooded area, took out the camera and proceeded to cross the wooden bridge, but quickly backed off after I slid, despite wearing lug-soled hiking boots – “nope, not gonna do that” I told myself. You can see the slick surface.

What what wasn’t slick or slightly frozen, appeared to be submerged in water.

In the adjacent wooded area, frost had settled onto fallen leaves, but a bigger threat, in my opinion, was that the mild temps meant ticks might be in the leaves and I wanted no hitchhikers. Scientists are already predicting another tick explosion for ALL of 2022, not just the warmer months. Sigh.

Well, that was a short trip! Annoyed, I crossed the road again, not really in the mood to return to the car, nor entertain the need to figure out another destination with impending bad weather. Just then a jogger ran down this path into a wooded area and was soon out of sight.

Good – I would investigate and this was somewhere new to me. I wandered along the path …

… which was nothing special and it appeared our recent heavy winds had taken down many trees, leaving the area looking a little like overgrown Pick-Up-Stix

I eventually turned back, discouraged by multiple muddy puddles which I didn’t want seeping into my boots. “It’s always something” I muttered to myself.

I decided the only good thing about this day was it was sunny enough to get a decent, long-shadow selfie like you see up top.

Well, that would do it – nothing more to see here. I went closer to the elementary school to take pictures of the words emblazoned on two park benches out front. I guess you’re never too young to know about these virtues; so will these pearls of wisdom remain with the students the rest of their lives? I momentarily thought of the impact the November 30th murderous rampage at Oxford High School by a fellow classmate had impacted the community and our state.

I pushed those sad thoughts aside once I saw a poster of this Dr. Seuss book title taped to a school window, so I took a photo of it and decided that would be my title for today’s post (hmm, better have a catchy title as this walk wasn’t going to create much fodder for photos or a narrative).

There was a “Little Free Library” and I chuckled to see that nestled between The Jungle Book and 101 Dalmations was a book on exercising, then next to that how to combat pain through food. I wondered aloud if it was the same donor – so the how-to book did not work so well?

As I was unlocking the car door, I noticed a Blue Jay and went to get a photo (yay – finally a critter for my post). He/she flew off, but I saw a wooded area which looked to be a neighborhood … well I was leery about driving to any other parks due to the predicted wintry mix, so why not explore a little?

So that is how I ended up at Hawthorn.

A different type of nature nook.

I didn’t really feel like I was trespassing, as I was walking, not driving and just enjoying the ambiance of this community.

I spent the next two hours walking along, pleased with this nature nook along Nathan Drive.

This was a winding road which took me through a condo and housing complex. I was impressed by the many picturesque ponds and best of all, no muddy feet or puddles to tromp through. In a Google search later that day, I discovered there were 300 homes and condos which were all situated off Nathan Drive.

A jogger passed by and gave me a wave and mouthed “good morning” as did a pair of dog walkers, thus I reckoned I didn’t look like an trespasser or intruder, but probably someone visiting for Christmas.

It smelled like Christmas trees here and you may not be able to tell, but resin was dripping from the pine cones. Having not had or smelled a real Christmas tree since I was a child, what a heady scent it was.

I was sure I’d see deer in the woodsy area, but nary a one.

Even in the usual barren and blah-looking Winter landscape, I thought the reflections of the trees on the ponds were beautiful. The Weeping Willows had retained some of their leaves – or maybe the warm weather earlier in the month triggered the unfurling of leaves?

In this pond, a thin veil of ice had formed on the surface after that incessant rain had stopped.

I saw (as well as heard) Canada Geese and grabbed a few shots.

There were some geese squabbling in the distance.

There were songbirds galore as I passed many bird feeders. By sound I identified Cardinals, Bluejays, Nuthatches and Chickadees, a delight to the ears as I walked through this massive Hawthorn complex. There weren’t many Christmas decorations, but this house looked festive with its berries, bulbs and bird feeders.

The only item that marred the mostly picturesque area was the intrusion of the twin, striped steam vent stacks of the DTE Trenton Channel Power Plant in the background. (Of course if you used your imagination you might imagine them as candy canes in this holiday season.)

I retraced my route and ended back at the car and sunk down into the seat. I checked the pedometer: 6.3 miles and even though I’d already made my mileage goal, I would add this for good measure. I snapped on the radio to hear the progress of the storm and learned the wintry mix had slowed down. No problem, I was going to head for home anyway. (Actually I returned home with plenty of time to spare, as the ugly weather didn’t happen until the wee hours of Monday morning and it was the first of two ice storms we’ve received in as many weeks.)

Later, inspired by the Dr. Seuss poster about reading, I plunked down on the couch, opened a book … then promptly nodded off. The book tumbled onto the rug and I fell into a dead sleep.

[Dr. Seuss quote from Pinterest]

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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74 Responses to “Oh, the Places You’ll Go.”

  1. Sandra J says:

    So many fun things to see in this post Linda, this time of year it is hard to find places that are not soaked or muddy. Goose island is a great place for wild life when they come back around. Those bird feeders are the way to go if you want to here them singing in the early mornings. Wonderful tour today Linda 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Sandra – I felt like the Energizer Bunny once I got started as I kept going and going. I really was glad to find this “neighborhood” and I didn’t even walk to the very end of Nathan Drive, but I thought I might get lost if I went any farther, plus I was mindful of the impending bad weather.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It was fun to see a new area through your eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne. After we got that onslaught of rain the tail end of June, most of the bigger parks I go to were flooded on the trails and the asphalt or cement pathways, so I was limited where to go and now this is another option again.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. peggy says:

    I can’t say I have ever seen a post quite this long. Looks like despite the rain and mud you had a very long walk. I seldom have the energy or time to create a post this size. I remember when I first started blogging one of their suggestions was — keep your posts fairly short or you’ll lose the attention of your audience. I don’t totally agree with that suggestion. We had a lot of rain here this weekend with lots of mud. Liked the words on those bright blue benches.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’ve actually had longer posts in the past Peggy when I would go to multiple parks on one weekend day, then I started dividing them up as they were so picture laden. I write the posts the day I take the walk, so when I get the post ready, I just pair the pictures and tweak the draft to the pictures. We had a lot of rain last year and also in December – the mud has been awful, but not where I walk everyday as it is higher than the Creek so mud-free, tick-free … unfortunately not goose-poop-free though. Yes the words were nice for school kids to learn.

      Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Glad there are places you can get higher than the mud. Ha We had 4 inches of ran last Saturday. We are higher than the water run off, but still get standing puddles all over our three acres. Winter is definitely not my favorite season. I always enjoy your photographs.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I never remember the soggy grounds and mud until the last few years and it’s been quite an ordeal sometimes going to parks and trying to walk on the trails. The bigger parks often put down pea gravel, sometimes not. I am glad you enjoy the photographs Peggy.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Anne says:

    Good on you for walking in all weathers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne – We finally got rid of the pesky ice and I got out both weekend days. The ice was bad in front of my house; the street was a sheet of ice. I don’t mind the cold as I took the bus for years, so have cold-weather items to bundle up, though we are going to -5 to -15 degrees F (-20 C to -26 C) overnight.

      Like

  5. You are a dedicated walker. I just don’t walk outside in the cold weather. I try to seek out indoor places.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Kate. I don’t mind the cold as I took the bus for years, so have cold-weather clothes, but I hate the snow and ice. We will be going to -5 to -15 here tonight. Yikes! I may take the car to the Park, then walk which seems like a good idea.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Your walking knows no bounds Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      That was a beautiful day Wayne – I wanted to get out and about before the weather turned ugly. Do you still have snow? We have an Arctic chill here and it’s going to -5 to -15 tonight. I may have to bring some squirrels home with me tomorrow. 🙂

      Like

      • Wouldn’t that be something If they jumped up and wrapped their tails around each others so as to create a perfect living scarf for you!
        Why You’d be the talk of town!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I would have to try to take a selfie or ask something to take it so I could post it here. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I know you’ve talked about your furry friends hoping onto your foot, have any tried to climb up onto your shoulder?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I have not had that happen Wayne, but my friend Carol, who lives in New York was out in the yard gardening and a squirrel misjudged his jump and landed on her back. They both freaked out and both of them froze in place. The squirrel didn’t run away right away. She didn’t want it to claw or bite her, so she didn’t move until it finally jumped off. It was kind of funny, but unplanned on his part. She feeds the birds in her backyard, plus she shelters and feeds feral cats, something she’s done for years. She feeds everyone early in the morning and has remarked that she will take her bag of birdseed out to the feeder and there is one chickadee that is so excited, he lands on her shoulder or elbow in anticipation of eating. Sometimes she cups her hands with some seeds and he eats. I would love that to happen. I get the chickadees waiting on the tree, but not near me. But anyway, the squirrels sit under the feeder waiting for seeds to drop. She has a baffle and the birdfeeder is squirrel proof so they can’t access, but still try. I saw a huge hawk at the Park this morning. Saw the shadow and the wings flapping so looked up.

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      • That would have been a really funny video!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, she said it scared her and afterward she wasn’t sure who was more scared, her or the squirrel as it was totally unplanned on its part! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Laurie says:

    I’m glad you finally found a suitable place to walk before the storm hit, Linda. Thanks for sharing the photos of Grosse Ile with us. It’s a place I have heard about and would like to visit sometime.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I thought it was going to be a dud of a trip Laurie and in the back of my mind was that wintry mix on the way. It is very pretty there in Summer, lots of large boats and sail boats cruising around. This “neighborhood” had more road to explore, but I finally turned around. Hope you did well in your event on Saturday. Did you end up walking as you anticipated doing?

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      • Laurie says:

        I’m glad your trip wasn’t a “dud”. That’s the thing about exploring – you run into some duds along with some gems.

        I wound up running on Saturday. I felt pretty good. It was very cold and the trails were completely snow-covered. I covered a little over 15 miles in 3 hours – 1 loop shorter than last year, but still way more than I expected.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You are amazing Laurie! It probably did you good to get back into the routine and forget about your tooth. There was a runner at the Park this morning and it was 12 degrees. We don’t have many runners there, especially in Winter. Yes, the “duds” do happen sometimes. I’ve gone to a metropark or that new wildlife refuge and have seen not seen anything but the landscape.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. ruthsoaper says:

    It looks like a nice little hidden neighborhood you discovered. Love your sense of adventure.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was really nice Ruth plus it was welcome since it was a gorgeous Winter day (after Christmas with all the rain) and smooth walking. Thank you. I have had a slow start this year for walking due to last week’s ice storm

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  9. Rebecca says:

    I love your ending Dr. Seuss quote. It’s perfect for your after Christmas excursion! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Rebecca. I always thought Dr. Seuss had a lot of fun quotes and books … the creativity he had is amazing. I thought it was a perfect quote as I had taken pictures of my shoes in the leaves (which looked more frozen there than in the picture).

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Joni says:

    I’m glad you found a new place to explore after a couple of dead-ends! It looks like a delightful and peaceful neighbourhood, and much dryer. I enjoyed it all, but then I’m partial to long posts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Joni says:

      PS. I liked the title too, the Dr. Seuss and the park benches.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I always liked Dr. Seuss though I didn’t read his books as a kid, but used to see the children’s librarian reading to the kids when I had to go to the library for school projects, like research for book reports. Ms. Montie would gather the kids in a circle around her and she’d read Dr. Seuss and she would be so animated and the kids would watch her, just enthralled with her reading. I can picture her – a huge crocheted shawl around her shoulders and her glasses slipping down her nose and the hand motions and her voices for each character. Her stool was at the same height as those kids’ stools, so down on their level. It was fun to watch her. The children’s part of the library was a little alcove area. The park benches were a nice touch to this school. I had nice memories of elementary school back in Oakville … so different than now with everything digital.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, it was a beautiful day Joni – you remember we both got that first bout of freezing rain in the overnight? I could have skipped the first two spots, but was glad to find this place. I could have walked even farther as the drive went on, but I wanted to get back. I know – you and I have lots to say in our posts, so they are long and picture laden aren’t they? I could have skipped the first two places I went, but it would take away from the “story”.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Little Free Library – I found that interesting Linda over here a lot of villages maintain disused red phone boxes as information booths and book exchanges. Rather than remove them the company gave them to the village after removing the phone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Now that is an ingenious way to celebrate those now disused red phone boxes Andy. I remember seeing them when I visited your country back in 1979. I think they are a great idea and they keep popping up more and more. Here, you have to register your Little Free Library and there is even a website that tells where they are located and the name of the owner.

      Like

  12. I love your jokes and light spirit despite the obstacles you encountered. Candy canes 🍭!! Fresh air, beautiful scenes, added miles to your total for the year, and a few critters to join you in your adventures. The perfect recipe for a restful sleep! Did you dream about the deer you didn’t see? 😉 🦌🦌🦌

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Shelley – I was not about to quit and go home and I was happy to find this “neighborhood” which had even more of a winding street, but I ended up turning back and heading for the car. Ha ha … when I saw the bucks a couple of years ago, I was driving down the street and they crossed in front of me. Camera wasn’t handy and I had to just watch them prancing in front of the car. There’s a guy who walks at Council Point Park and he lives on the island. He walks there sometimes, not so much while the bridge was being repaired. But he has shown me pictures on his phone of the deer that he and his wife see on their morning walks almost every morning. Sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m always impressed with the places you find to walk. Deer are exceptional at being spotted when the onlookers are cameraless. Is that a word? LOL. You did capture the fawn, maybe that’ll always be your best deer photo?! It’s hard to top!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think it was my best deer photo as the only other one I got was looking through the trees at me. I saw those two bucks crossing the road on Grosse Ile and the camera was on the back seat. I was talking to a photographer at the River yesterday and he told me in the Summer he sees deer swimming across from Mud Island (an uninhabited island in the Detroit River) to Dingell Park and in the Winter they cross from Mud Island on the ice. I said “how come I’m not that lucky to see that?” Then of course I had the opportunity to talk about my fawn shots. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, both photos are great!
        I’d like to see the deer crossing the river too. Neither one of us get shots like that because we’re working FT still! 😆😉🙄

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes we can’t linger like we want for a while longer. The walker at the Park walks with a friend, but every morning, he walks with his wife where they live on the Island. He showed me some pictures of families they see very morning. The photographer I spoke with on Saturday says he sees coyotes on the ice too. So he asked me if I saw the story on the dog rescue on the ice, because it was a photographer who saw the coyote when he was at the River taking eagle pics. They worried the coyote would go after the dog who was out on the ice.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Wow – that’s fascinating. I don’t see anyone to talk to on my walks when it’s winter time. Glad Mr. joins me when we do go outside. The treadmill and my books that I’ve accumulated to read are keeping me company.
        I’d worry about a coyote too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well, I wear a mask 100% of the time when I venture outdoors since the pandemic began, so in Winter, despite using anti-fogging spray on my glasses and using a N95 mask which is supposed to prevent fogging, just as soon as I open my mouth to talk, in this bitter cold weather, my glasses still fog up, so it’s a problem. So, I really try just to wave to people or stay to myself if possible, especially if it’s a day I drove … then I can’t see to drive home and I don’t want to touch my face. The COVID stats for Michigan are very bad – I don’t want to be a statistic, despite being double-vaxxed and boostered. We were the only ones at the River last Saturday – normal people would be staying home where it’s warm.

        Liked by 1 person

      • It’s been too cold for us to walk outside. I hate the fogging of glasses factor. The treadmill has come in very handy this week.
        It’s nice you’ve found a way to keep on keeping on while staying safe.
        We will make it through this – keep the faith!

        Like

  13. Ally Bean says:

    I like the barren landscapes of winter. There’s a beauty there in the grays and reflections. Your photos do them justice. I enjoy the idea of a free book about walking/jogging just hanging out waiting for someone to walk away with it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ally. I also like the simple beauty of the reflections on the pond and bare trees. There are several of those Little Free Libraries at the parks I frequent and I always find myself peering at what is inside of them. We have a LFL in my city that parents who lost a child have set up and it is always crammed solid with books.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I love how you remained undaunted and determined until you found a good place to walk! The smell from those pine cones must have been wonderful, worth all the effort to take this walk! I like how weeping willows look beautiful in the winter, too. And the courage and kindness benches are so timely. ❄️

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Barbara – it was such a beautiful day, sunny and finally that all-day rain from Christmas had stopped, so I aimed to get a long walk in. I like those weeping willows too. At Elizabeth Park, they have many old willows and in the springtime, you see all the yellow leaves unfurling and it is really pretty (and welcome). Yes, those benches are timely for sure … those high school students returned to school yesterday, but not their regular school for a couple of weeks yet as it will undergo a small transformation at the hallway where the rampage took place.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Linda, you sure walk a lot farther than i would. Is it safe walking out alone like that? We live in a nutty, violent society; you better be careful and at least carry mace or something similar. Be careful! 🌲🌲🌳

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Well I admit I do carry pepper gel and a whistle in the Summer, but I’d have to carry it inside my coat in the Winter. This wooded area was not too dense (not like when I got lost at Crosswinds Marsh on a very hot day in August and I was worried as I couldn’t find my way out of the forest) and the neighborhood seemed quite nice. I try not to think about what’s going on these days and some happens in automobiles as well. I was enjoying the walk and had already met my goal, but was meandering along enjoying the new sights.

      Like

  16. Prior... says:

    Hell Linda
    I like how you used Dr Seuss to anchor this post – from title to spots inside to the closing quote (which is a great one too)
    and smiling at how this post had a nice banter with the way you brought us to icy paths, joggers, critters, and even sounds of birds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Hi Yvette and Happy New Year! I’m so behind in Reader and saw you had a few posts – I hope o catch up a little tonight. I’m glad you liked this post. I’ve always been a Dr. Seuss fan. Though I was too old to read his books, I always watched “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” so I guess I am a kid at heart. 🙂 The trek started off as a bit of a dud, so I was happy to discover Hawthorn to get in a long walk and some more photos taken. The birdsong I heard along the way made it a very peaceful walk.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        oh the birdsongs are true gifts – and maybe mores in winter —
        and cheers to being a kid at heart
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I agree Yvette about birdsong. My neighbor had two very tall Bradford Pear trees and this type of tree is notorious for splitting in half. But, before that happened with one of them nearest to my house, the leaves stayed on those trees until late December. The birds would build nests in them and I’d be out shoveling snow or running the car and the birdsong would fill the air. Very nice on a bitter cold day. It’s good to stay a kid at heart – it helps to combat what’s going on in the world right now.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        💛💜♥️

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Prior... says:

    PS – I am so glad you mentioned the ticks and how we need to be mindful in winter – because last month I insisted we give the dog his Frontline and my spouse hates all chemicals but we really know this is needed for dogs – anyhow, he was saying that in winter it is not needed and that is partly true – but when the weather is warm (as it has been in lots of places) we still have to be careful – and so he yielded and trusted my suggestion – but your note about it was good to read 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Dave says:

    Perfect title, Linda, considering your day’s adventure turned out entirely different than you planned it to be. Way to be persistent, finding that neighborhood after a handful of start/stops, and earning a respectable mileage in the process. Tell me more about the ticks if you get a minute. Not something we have to worry about here in Colorado (maybe because we’re high and dry?) Do you have to worry about them at your house as well, or only when you make your treks into the forest?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked it Dave – I’ve always liked Dr. Seuss and his creativity and I felt like the Energizer Bunny as I kept on going, trying to get a nice walk. I will send you a separate comment in case the link goes to your SPAM in a minute. I heard the story on the news, then read the story on the news stations website. It is due to climate change and it’s pretty scary, but we’ve had a lot more ticks the last few years due to warmer Winters here – they don’t die off and some are able to live even when it is cold now. It is not a problem in my own yard, as I live in the city, nor is it a problem at Council Point Park, which is actually a park in a residential neighborhood, but I now will worry going into wooded areas on my longer treks on weekends. I check my shoes but that doesn’t mean I see it either. About 20 years ago, a popular local weatherman in the Detroit area went up north and was bitten by a tick. He got Lyme Disease and had to quit his job as he felt so debilitated that he had no energy to do more than walk a few steps, then had to rest. He gave an interview about his condition after people asked “where is Rob Kress these days?” I think that was the first I’d ever heard of ticks and Lyme Disease.

      Like

      • Dave says:

        WordPress needs a “Don’t Like” option, even though I appreciate the comment. This kind of side effect of climate change needs more press. I had no idea.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I wish they’d put a “Don’t Like” option because sometimes you want to dislike, or empathize with someone and “liking” seems wrong doesn’t it? I heard the story and was glad they put it on their website so I could read it over to make sure I heard the facts correctly. Interesting they think the mRNA vaccines help thwart Lyme disease and tick-borne illnesses … how did they discover that? I’m going to tread carefully all year around now to avoid any “hitchhikers” coming home with me.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Here is the story about the ticks Dave. Last Summer we had so much rain, that I never walked on the nature trails like I usually do as they were muddy. My favorite Metroparks have asphalt paths as well, so I’ll likely go that route going forward.
      https://www.audacy.com/wwjnewsradio/news/national/climate-change-could-make-it-more-likely-to-get-lyme-disease?utm_campaign=www.audacy.com%252Fwwjnewsradio&utm_content=1641680919&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook,twitter&utm_term=WWJ-AM

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dave says:

        Fascinating: infected ticks survive better in cold temps than their healthy peers do. Sounds like something out of the Book of Revelation!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, it’s very scary isn’t it Dave? I agree it should get more press as it’s a serious problem. Last year, Michigan, along with other parts of the country were scheduled to be part of the 17-year emergence of the Brood X Cicadas. We heard about it in 2020 already. I fretted over an ornamental tree, racking my brain as to whether I covered it 17 years before as these pests apparently seek small trees and cluster in them and do their damage. I didn’t cover it and despite all the press about the Cicadas, I never saw a single one, just our usual Cicadas singing/buzzing in the late Summer.

        Like

  19. I love how you turned a bad situation into a new adventure Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. bekitschig says:

    Hi Linda, that was a really fun post! I adore those benches. It really doesn’t take much to make this world a nicer place

    Like

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