What’s not to like about Autumn?

This trek to beautiful Elizabeth Park happened on November 6, 2021 and followed a rather meh trot around the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge earlier that morning.

This island park is filled with hundreds of trees, Maples and Oaks mostly. In order to glimpse the peak Fall foliage you might want to make a trip or two during October – the Maples usually turn their vibrant shades of red and orange, followed by the Oaks with their golden hues. However, leaf peeping in 2021 came with an asterisk because, due to an abundance of rain in the Spring, coupled with a hot-and-steamy Summer, many of Michigan’s trees started dropping their leaves in August. I heard and/or read multiple interviews with arborists who confirmed climate change was the culprit. Sigh.

We had several rainy weekends in October, so I decided to just wait until after Halloween to make my foliage-glimpsing visit because the local folks often take their discarded carved pumpkins to Elizabeth Park for the critters to enjoy. In the past, I’ve either watched, or been lucky enough to get a few shots of, squirrels cavorting in these orange orbs, so I was hopeful for a cute photo op. Even without any pumpkin shots, there are always squirrels, geese and ducks a’plenty. This time I was prepared for my fat friend on the Boardwalk and tucked a couple of cookies in my pocket for the always-begging groundhog, but he/she must’ve been tucked away in its burrow.

Because I’m a believer in the adage that every picture tells a story and because I will concede that I am wordy, today, instead of a long post, I’ll let the photos collected on this trek do most of the talkin’.

A vibrant red tree takes center stage – are these glacial erratics in the foreground? Fellow blogger Barbara will know.
Golden leaves which will soon join the others on the ground.
There’s a squirrel prowling around in these leaves – can you find it?
Doing a deep dive for acorns in a pile of leaves is like looking for a needle in a haystack!
This was the only pumpkin at Elizabeth Park and a little worse for the wear.
Humans have knobby knees; hmm … trees have them too?!
“Just struttin’ our stuff.”
“Oh look – a photographer. Smile and say ‘cheese’!”
“How about a nice profile shot Linda?”
“The other people give us corn to take our picture – what do you have for us?”
“Alrighty then, I’ll just poke around in the leaves and grass for food – hope I don’t starve!”
Some people have their ducks in a row … I had my geese goin’ on that day.
“Full speed ahead – showing off my power moves!”
The marina is not emptied out yet; boaters hoped to get more rides down the River.
Strolling the boardwalk on a sunny morn.
Weeds withering away between the shadows of the boardwalk railings.
A mottled Oak leaf grabs onto a crack in the boardwalk.
The long and winding boardwalk comes to an end at the canal.
Female Mallard Duck in a cove area of the canal.
Male Mallard Hydbrid Duek in the cove in the canal.
Ducks in the canal.
The best part of Autumn … the colors, cardigans and cooler weather.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
This entry was posted in nature, walk, walking and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

57 Responses to What’s not to like about Autumn?

  1. peggy says:

    Such a lovely post. I like every picture in this post, but the first one with the bridge really caught my eye. Do love the smaller bridges of this world.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Peggy. I like the smaller bridges too, especially this one which has the Willow tree nearby. That footbridge is one of three footbridges that cross the Canal at Elizabeth Park. The other two are identical, but smaller. The bridges will be celebrating a centennial anniversary in the next few years and many people come for wedding, prom or homecoming pictures as it is so picturesque.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Those might be glacial erratics, Linda, although they look like they were placed there by humans. I once asked my sister, the geologist, how I could know if everything I was labeling a glacial erratic was actually was. She said a geologist would have to examine the rock to see if it was native to the area or brought by the ice sheet from another place. But the ones deposited in unusual places and positions were likely left by the ice. So I don’t know!!!

    Your fall colors were stunning that day! Especially the red tree. 💕 I enjoyed your captions on the Canada geese pictures. I love the colors, cardigans and cooler weather of autumn, too. Love the yellow oak leaf. Ours were all brown last year. Thanks for taking me back for a visit to my favorite season.

    Liked by 1 person

    • As a geologist I would hazard a guess that those rocks are not erratics. All erratics get tumbled and worn. The one on the right shows a sharp edge.
      Plus what are the odds that three similar rock types were dropped off side by side so evenly?
      These are very small as well, which means they were put there by an excavator.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was wondering if they had rolled them into place Wayne? Barbara has some huge erratics she sees in Connecticut on her nature hikes. I have seen one that has a marker that labels it as an erratic on Grosse Ile in a small forest area, but was guessing on these. Those rocks have been there for for quite a while.

        Like

      • those rocks were placed there by humans via a excavator!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was so picturesque at Elizabeth Park that day Barbara and I hit it just perfectly for peeping at the leaves. It was amazing to me that the Refuge, just two or three miles away, on the very same day, did not have the same stunning colors. Autumn is my favorite season too and there is always something to see at this park. I didn’t mean to put you on the spot with the erratics but figured you see so many of them in your nature walks that you would know. That makes sense that they were probably “rolled into that spot” or are just big landscape rocks, but I also thought that if they were actual glacial erratics, they might move them to put them on display. I thought of you yesterday as to rocks because I walked at Cove Point at Lake Erie Metropark. I don’t get to that side of the park as much as the other, but we’d had a lot of rain, so figured that was a safer bet to walk with no flooded pathway. The shoreline is lined with huge rocks. I assumed (incorrectly it turns out) that these rocks were natural formations at some point and just placed there for aesthetic purposes. I was chatting with a couple walking their dog and we were complaining about the recessed areas that collected so much water and we had to veer off the path onto the spongy grass. So the guy said to me “I don’t know why they ever put all those fake rocks along the shoreline. I remember years ago it was a sandy area and they could have made a natural beach and not constructed the expensive wave pool which is not included in our annual park pass!” I didn’t want to appear ignorant that they were NOT real rocks (how does one differentiate between real rocks and fake rocks anyway and I thought they are very picturesque). I said “I’ve only been walking here since the Summer of 2018, so didn’t know about the beach.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • No worries, Linda, I didn’t feel put on the spot. It must be amazing to be a geologist and be able to discern the origin and history of a rock by examining it carefully. I have a quote from one of my sister’s colleagues that I’m planning to use in a future post. It starts out: “The entire Connecticut landscape is a gift of the glacier.” I don’t think the guy complaining about “fake” rocks knew what he was talking about. They may have been brought there from somewhere else, like many of the seawalls and stone walls we have here, but they are real. We just don’t know where they came from. Once we were driving along the road in North Carolina and we saw a sign offering large rocks for gardens for sale. We laughed so hard because here in Connecticut there are so many rocks I doubt anyone would have to buy one to find one. More often we’re trying to get rid of them or work around the huge ones! Anyhow, one has to enjoy autumn while it lasts, and then dream about it the rest of the year. Although I enjoy spring almost as much.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Okay, that’s good Barbara. I know they were placed perfectly but they might have been more than just a “Plain Jane Boulder” so that’s interesting to know. I’ve thought about his comment because these are huge rocks that line the entire shoreline – not just cement blocks like they use when constructing a seawall. They do sell rocks for landscaping here and we have to pay for them. I have some large lava rocks that I wanted to move as they were fillers in the beginning, but the bushes in the garden have grown so big that I wanted to move them into an open area and those large lava rocks are so embedded in the soil that even with a shovel it was a “no go”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Interesting. Most of our seawalls are made of boulders, although we do have some cement ones.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yours are more natural looking then – I guess whatever is the sturdiest and will be most cost-effective but I’d like the boulders better too.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. As always, I love the ducks. You got some great shots of them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Kate – the Mallard Hybrids are always fun to see – a cross between Mallard and a Pekin and they always hang out together in the canal area. I’m hoping the next time I visit will be duckling and gosling time for some cute Mother’s Day photos.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Great shots Linda! You are paying attention to not only detail but structure.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Laurie says:

    While I’m not a huge fan of Autumn (it’s my third favorite season!), I have to admit you did get some wonderful shots on your foray around Elizabeth Park. Too bad you missed the groundhog. We have one just beyond our backyard that you could shoot. With a camera, of course! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Laurie – this was a beautiful Fall day and I was lucky there were that many vibrant trees in early November. That Willow tree by the big bridge is prettier in Fall than during the Summer months. I wonder if the groundhog already went to his burrow to hibernate – I’d be happy to shoot yours with the camera. 🙂 I have to share with you that I finally heard the Spring Peepers yesterday. I’ve gone out several times looking for them in the past and yesterday I found them “singing” in several places, took pictures where they were, but got no frogs in the pictures. Boy can they sing! And they were not in bogs per se, but in grassy recessed areas that had flooded. We’ve had so much rain that leaves and even some pond scum had collected on the surface of the water there. What a treat to hear them!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Laurie says:

        Spring peepers are my favorite sign of spring. We heard some during a trail run about 3 or 4 weeks ago. They are really hard to see, much less take a picture of. I bet if we would go back there now we could find eggs or maybe even tadpoles!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I couldn’t believe how loud their singing was! I suspect they ducked underneath when they saw me, but maybe they just blend into the water. I used to collect tadpoles when I was a kid. We had a meadow, creek and small forest at the end of our street and we’d bring home tadpoles in a jar – my mother said “they go back to the creek before they grow any legs!”

        Liked by 1 person

  6. ruthsoaper says:

    What a lovely fall day it was and your photos are stunning. I am glad that we are finally coming into spring though. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This is a lovely post. I particularly like several of the shots with dramatic shadows. I forget to look at shadows.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne – it was such a beautiful day and my reward from trip to the Refuge, just a few hours earlier that day. I like how the sun casts those shadows from the boardwalk railing – very unique sometimes. That’s the same venue where I got the railing shadows on the steps last year and they looked a bit “wiggly”.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Eilene Lyon says:

    Really gorgeous tree images. Those geese really were losers, weren’t they? A few days ago I looked out my office window to see three turkeys trotting up the road. They sure seemed to be on a mission!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Rebecca says:

    Well, you know that I love autumn, and you got some beautiful, colorful photos! BTW, I have plenty of those weeds growing in my yard, if ever you need some. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Great collection of photos! The autumn leaves are aglow with sunlight.
    The solo leaf with its shadow on the boardwalk and the black fence along the canal are tranquil photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Esther – it is always a picturesque and tranquil walk at Elizabeth Park, especially along the boardwalk. The only exception is the geese when you get a flock of them honking their heads off!

      Like

  11. Priti says:

    Beautiful photos excellent shot thanks for sharing 🙂😊

    Liked by 1 person

  12. What beautiful colors Linda! I never get tired of your pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. trumstravels says:

    Beautiful colours! I love fall, my favourite season. That bridge is really lovely and I like all the critter pics!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      The colors were stunning that day – Fall should last a little longer in my opinion. That bridge is almost 100 years old and there are two smaller but identical bridges crossing the canal, but everyone goes to that bridge and poses for wedding, prom, homecoming – even graduation photos as it’s so picturesque. Glad you liked the critter pics Susan – it’s the only park around here where I see Pekin and Mallard Hybrid ducks.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Joni says:

    Lovely photos Linda…..autumn seems so long ago….it’s been a very long winter.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Ally Bean says:

    Autumn is my favorite season so seeing these photos does my heart good. I love the idea of getting your geese in a row. Why let the ducks have all the glory!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, you and I share a love of Autumn Ally, the pretties season of all of them. There are so many geese roaming around Elizabeth Park, so if you need to leave in a hurry, you need to plan ahead, because at any given time, 20 or 30 of them may decide to amble across the only road to get in and out of the park and people are queued up as they take their sweet time. I liked the contingent of geese floating down the center of the canal too.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Zazzy says:

    Autumn is my favorite season, even more than spring and I like spring quite a lot. I love the colors of autumn and the crispness as the heat of summer falls off. Your photos are lovely and I think are prettier than our last several autumns. Who knew it had to do with the cold wet springs we’ve been having. We most always have a late summer drought so that doesn’t seem predictive of a good color season.

    I enjoy your geese. They look as thought they are waiting for you to frame your shot and are posing for you.

    We used to have a ground hog that apparently lived under the wood walkway to the garden. Or he just liked to hang out there during the day. He never sat still long enough to get a picture of him.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Autumn’s colors and smells and cooler weather after a hot and humid Summer makes this season a hit with me. I dealt with Winter up to my ears and the wintry mixes and ice storms were bad this year – more so than in recent years and it’s lingering on. We may have a wintry mix this coming Monday again. I am late getting here tonight as we had 50 mph wind gusts and I shut my computer down for a few hours as the lights were flickering a little. This is such a picturesque park Zazzy and filled with many geese and ducks and some swans – other critters not so much, except that groundhog. Funny story – I go there at least once a month, but usually in the morning, my first stop, but last year I was there later, like mid-day and here was this groundhog standing next to its burrow right next to the boardwalk. I saw a man pushing a stroller with a young child in it coming toward me, so I flagged him down and said “better not go on this side of the boardwalk – look at the groundhog.” I was thinking it might bite the child, right? The man says “oh, no worries – we always see it and feed it sometimes; it begs on the boardwalk as soon as it gets busy.” Who knew? So ever since then, I take a treat for the groundhog too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Prior... says:

    So nice to see the autumn colors and the beauty in your photos
    Too two?
    The red tree (postcard worthy)
    And the shadow of the railing on the walkway!
    So inviting and quiet and functional beauty – your angle and level was spot on.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s