It was a fairy nice walk.

As promised, today’s post is about a stop at Oakwoods Metropark, the second leg of my July 2nd round robin of the trio of parks along the Huron River.

As to my quest for adventure, you’ll recall that Willow Metropark was a bit blah, but this venue, Oakwoods Metropark, helped make up for the dried-up Washago Pond, just missing that fawn photo op and my abysmal attempts at capturing the outside art collection.

Admittedly, the saying goes“you can’t win ‘em all” and this was before my bevy of birdie encounters later in the Summer and Fall of 2022.

Little did I know I was about to find a pair of Chipmunks, my only new furry discovery last year, (although there was a sleeping Raccoon at Council Point Park two days in a row, but I didn’t see its face or tail).

It was almost mid-day as I walked from the parking lot along the pathway toward the Nature Center.

I passed the bark hut and stopped to take photos of it and the materials used in its construction.

The Nature Center was a hopping spot on my agenda.

Passing beneath a canopy of trees, I was immediately grateful for the shade. As I neared the Nature Center I heard the murmur of voices and saw there was a hubbub of activity. I assumed the interpretive classes had resumed since COVID shut them down. I ambled over, camera at the ready, to scope it out.

There are two large avian outdoor enclosures where Radar, the Great Horned Owl and Hawkeye, the Red-Tailed Hawk live. Both of these raptors are not releasable as they have sustained injuries rendering them unable to live on their own.

Radar, the Great Horned Owl.

Radar has been at the Nature Center since 2015 and is a permanent resident there after sustaining a closed-head injury while hunting for prey. He was swooping near the ground and was struck by a car. Radar is usually found perching in the back portion of his enclosure where it is darker.

I moved closer to the owl enclosure where I saw a young man attempting to grab Radar and wrap him in a towel or blanket. Radar struggled, talons outstretched, wings flapping and finally he was flat on his back.

I recognized Paula, the Oakwoods interpretive guide who conducted the “Walk, Talk and Sketch” class I took back in August 2019, so I nabbed her as she was entering Radar’s enclosure to ask if he was okay. She gave me a reassuring smile and said “no worries – it’s vet day today, so Radar and Hawkeye are each getting a routine check-up.”

Well this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to Radar, because as mentioned, he usually perches at the back of his enclosure in the dark. Photos I’ve taken in the past just show Radar’s penetrating stare, a pair of golden, glow-in-the-dark, non-blinking eyes. I always feel like I’m intruding into Radar’s personal space, so I move along.

The vet finished up a brief exam and Radar was gently placed on his perch. The unblinking eyes did not speak of any fear or anger at his capture, but, since this owl sat in stoic silence post-ordeal, I managed to get a half-decent photo.

I didn’t include Radar on my list of 2022 bird discoveries as the owl was not out in a natural environment.

Hawkeye, the Red-Tailed Hawk.

Meanwhile, waiting in the wings for the good doctor’s visit was Hawkeye.

The sign near Hawkeye’s enclosure tells visitors he has been at the Nature Center since 2008. He was found at Lower Huron Metropark and it is believed he was raised in a cage, which permanently damaged his ability to grow all his primary flight feathers on his left wing. Although Hawkeye can fly, he is unable to fly well enough to hunt for food. He’s very active and vocal when visitors approach his enclosure.

Well this is a scowl if I’ve ever seen one – do you agree?

Hawkeye had no doubt sensed the vet vibes, courtesy of Radar’s occasional hootin’ and hollerin’, so his angst was building. Note in the above and below photos how Hawkeye’s beak is open, as he was hyperventilating, a sure sign of agitation for domestic and wild birds. I saw my pet birds do that when the vet made a move to grab them, sometimes even in the waiting room before the visit.

Once the vet entered the enclosure, Hawkeye flew from his perch and around the enclosure to thwart him. He may have issues that limit his flying prowess, but he sure was on the move here.

I decided to move along as it seemed the vet was growing a little weary as he would attempt a capture and Hawkeye flew away again.

The Nature Center was chock-full of photo ops today.

I didn’t go inside the Center, where there is a turtle tank, butterfly habitat and historical items native to this region. Behind the building were multiple bird feeders and houses. The seed feeders were empty. During my interpretative walk back in 2019, we learned the feeders are left empty in Spring through early Fall when birds can forage on their own, but the Nature Center caters to their avian friends when the cold sets in.

There were several hummingbird feeders and a Ruby-throated Hummingbird hovering over, then dipping its beak into the nectar. Hope, the only hummingbird that stops at my two feeders, is likely to eat and run, leaving no photo ops for me. So, I got a few shots against the Center’s streaked window.

Then I met my first Chippies.

Yes, I had gone 66 years without seeing a Chipmunk – how can that be? But it wasn’t the pair of Chipmunks scurrying in and out of an opening under a concrete slab that caught my eye. I was marveling just how much fluorescent yellow caution tape was wrapped around this small wooden overlook. I hurried over to look for a sign why this wooden deck, with a good view of the Huron River, was now off limits.

Here was how it looked in 2019 when we assembled on the overlook in our sketching class.

And here is how it looked now, complete with a Chipmunk guarding the entrance.

Since I had the camera focused on the overlook anyway, I was able to get a few shots of the Chippies. It would have been nice if they posed side-by-side and I could have titled this post “Chip ‘n Dale” but nope, they each stuck their noggins out from their hidey-hole, but didn’t both venture out simultaneously.

Before I could get any closer to see if there was a sign explaining what happened, a booming voice said: “don’t take one more step – it is dangerous to get too close, whew, I thought I was the only nature lover that was crazy enough to walk in the heat of the day in this here woods, pleased to meet you ma’am – I’m Billy.” The words all tumbled out in one long sentence. I took a moment to process that info and said “nice to meet you Billy, I’m Linda. So what happened here?”

Billy said he walks here daily and explained that the wooden overlook began listing to the left and the earth beneath it was apparently unstable and crumbling. They have closed it until they can stabilize where the overlook juts out. I told him about Washago Pond and he tsk-tsked but said he only visits this venue.

Billy then relayed his Easter morning visit: “I was here on Easter Sunday morning, worshiping what God had created, instead of being within the confines of church. I was here very, very early – not a single soul, just me and I heard a noise and saw a doe – what a moment! A little later I saw a huge coyote and a wild turkey.” He finished his story by saying “you don’t get mornings like that often.” I said “I agree and I hope the doe was safe from that big coyote?” He said he didn’t know and like me, hoped it was okay.

I was surprised to hear of any wildlife at this park and asked “you mean right here on one of the named trails?” “Yep” he answered. Hmm – I wondered why I never have critter encounters here unless you want to count a fuzzy white Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillar and the guide said “don’t touch it – you’ll get sticky fibers embedded in your fingers!”

Perhaps I need new glasses?

Billy and I chatted about the weather and I said “I’d best be movin’ on as I’m going to Lower Huron Metropark after here.”

Now it was time for a walk in the woods.

The woods is not very dense at this park and the past few times it’s been a haven for mosquitoes. In this 35-minute walk they got me twice. I usually walk on the path which gives me a view of the Huron River, then there are multiple trails to veer off for, none of them very long.

As I embarked on the woodsy trail I saw this quaint little facade of a fairy cottage high up on this tree. I zoomed in – that is the photo you see up top.

I took two trails, swiveling my head this way and that to ensure I didn’t miss anything … there was really nothing to see this time of the day.

As I headed to the car I aimed for one last nature shot, a pretty blue dragonfly that dazzled in the sunlight and kept evading me as if to say “na, na, na – catch me if you can!”

I thought I’d stop at the Butterfly Viewing Nature Trail which is an area of this park with an abundance of flowers, so many that it has been certified as an official Monarch Butterfly Waystation by the organization Monarch Watch. “I’ll stop there first next time” I told myself as the car’s A/C felt way too good and I didn’t want to get sidetracked for my third and final park venue, Lower Huron Metropark, the topic of next week’s post.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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58 Responses to It was a fairy nice walk.

  1. peggy says:

    Such an adventure – everything had to be exciting. Loved the critters you included in this post. I see a chickmunk now and then, but they scurry off before I can capture their picture. Thanks for sharing this Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Peggy – well, this venue made up for the critterless post last week. My first chipmunks to see and they were cute. They sure were wary of me and in the second picture that chipmunk had a terrified look in his eyes.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. LaShelle says:

    I love that you not only relay the unique animals you see but also the people. What an eventful walk!! Never a dull moment with you Linda and your love of nature is thick in this one ☺️🥰

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this post and the walk too LaShelle. There was lots going on this time. I often meet interesting people – this was one of those times with Billy. I was laughing at those chipmunks – the second picture it had a real terrified look on its face, like I was coming after it!

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      • LaShelle says:

        So freakin funny 🤣 I love it

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well I wish I was doing that walk, even in the heat, instead of anticipating this storm. I still have photos from July, September, October and November to write about. I took August off for weekend jaunts as I was trying to get things done in/around the house, but went every day I could to my regular park.

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      • LaShelle says:

        That’s wonderful. I’m not a big fan of the cops myself. I’m sooo ready for spring… Kinda. I say kinda because well you know that spring is my busiest season and this year is crazier than last. I just finished ordering my first seed haul. I have a lot more to order over the coming months and I have five big flats of flowers growing in my house as we speak. That being said, I’m over the cold and I’m ready for walks in my garden and for the first of many flower arrangements 🥰💐🪷

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You are industrious growing flowers in flats already LaShelle – well yay you, when you are ready to plant and they are big enough with a great start already.

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      • LaShelle says:

        I can’t wait. On pins and needles looking for sprouts

        Liked by 1 person

  3. This was refreshing to read as I tell myself to get out of bed and walk to the creek while it is freezing outside.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Anne – glad I inspired you to think of warmer days when you walked to the creek and could sling off your jacket or sweater, instead of bundling up and walking when it is freezing outside. We are getting 3-6, maybe 7 inches of wet snow starting Wednesday morning. It’s been almost snow free so far this Winter, but no longer. Our area is getting the most snow – ugh.

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      • We had a very light dusting, soon gone.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was amazed our snow was gone from sidewalks and streets, so, with the sun out today it was a wonderful walk. Told the critters with any luck, I’d be back by the weekend (NOW getting 6-8 inches of snow tomorrow). But heard the news later and found out we’ve having more snow Friday into Saturday and Saturday into Sunday. Ugh – the calm Winter is starting to seem like a memory.

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      • Those are dire threats. Our forecasts often sound ominous, and then I look at the fine print. They are referring to elevations above 3,500 feet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Well so far we have had 5.5 inches of wet, heavy snow. I went out early this morning and shoveled about an inch of snow – it was very heavy, so I pushed it. I looked outside later today and it was snowing heavily, so didn’t go out later to do it – hopefully that is not a mistake tomorrow morning. Now we’re getting another two to four inches Saturday into Sunday and then a very cold period.

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  4. Everything is so green! Makes me long for spring.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Me too Kate – especially with this 3-6, maybe 7-inch snowstorm we are getting on Wednesday. I hope it fizzles out!

      Liked by 1 person

      • They are predicting snow here too but don’t know how much. We are north of Philadelphia and there is a line where north is snow and south is rain. They are not exactly sure where that line will be so we’ll get anything from a dusting to 6 inches.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I’m south of Detroit and the southernmost counties usually don’t get the big snowstorms, but it’s different this time. They have upped our total to 6-8 inches of heavy, wet snow. I’m not looking forward to that and today was a sunny and gorgeous day; most of the snow melted on sidewalks, though the Park was icy and I walked in the snow there as it was safer.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Walking Away says:

    What a great day out. You brought the whole walk to life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Walking Away! As Winter and snow will finally arrive this week, I am thinking back how I complained how warm it was that day. It was a lovely walk, topped off by my first sighting of Chipmunks, no matter how many woodsy venues I go to, I’d never seen one. Thinking of nice Summer walks will get me through our big snowstorm we will have this week.

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      • Walking Away says:

        I love snow for the first day or two. After that I have to try hard to like it as it becomes an inconvenience. I don’t feel that way if I’m somewhere on holiday though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yesterday we got a couple of inches, most of which is gone. But I have to admit it was very pretty and I would have taken photos but it was snowing very hard at the time. It does become an inconvenience, plus dirty from the cars. For me, I work from home now, but never drove to work, just hopping on the bus near my street, so I never had to drive in Winter so my winter driving skills are not great. And, the older I get, I’m less inclined to try and walk on snow or ice … not so fearless these days.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Walking Away says:

        I can relate to that

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Today was gorgeous … the calm before the storm which they’ve upped the total of snow. Walking to the Park was nice, but once there, it was a lot of ice on the pathway and something rare these days, the sun, so had to be careful not to miss icy patches with sun glare. I am definitely thinking Spring.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. You always meet some interesting characters Linda! Maybe Chip was looking for Dale?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I do meet interesting characters don’t I Wayne? This guy was pretty wound up (considering how hot it was that day) and he was so excited about his Easter morning finds. It is not that dense of a forest – there may be other places in the Park that are more dense, but I usually go here as I like to stop at the Nature Center and I don’t get lost on the trails as they are not that long. The first time I was there Paula was just releasing a Monarch. It was very exciting as it emerged from its chrysalis. I had the camera with me, but since we were to assemble for the start of the sketching class in a few minutes, I had put it away. That butterfly fluttered away too quickly to get a shot, but I watched it emerge and spread its wings. I think you’re right about the chipmunk – did you see the terrified look on its face in the second photo? I wished I had peanuts for it (even though you can’t feed the wildlife here).

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ally Bean says:

    It’s gray here today, so seeing some photos with some color in them is a joy. Funny how once the snow arrives I forget that spring is a’coming soon. A nice reminder.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, for sure. Our snowfall from yesterday wasn’t bad and the driveway and roads are clear, but everyone who clamored for lots of snow will get it starting Wednesday a.m. My area will get the most the weather people say. Here’s a pleasant thought my weatherman Tweeted and will help you to think Spring: “We gain more than 2 minutes of daylight every day now through May 17th.”

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  8. trumstravels says:

    I love that little hummingbird. We don’t fill our feeders either from about 1 April to end of October. They always find something to eat that time of year. But in the winter I know its’ a struggle for them. That looks like a really nice park but it’s sad about the Owl and Hawk, too bad they aren’t able to fly about with the other Owls and Hawks

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I liked that hummingbird too Susan. I put out two hummingbird feeders for one hummingbird who doesn’t visit often. Last Summer I took them down as it was so hot and despite changing the water daily and using drops to keep the nectar sweet, it looked cloudy and I was getting ants, so I took it down. Before you followed me, I wrote about my neighbor Marge, who passed away in 2017; she had hummingbird feeders at all her windows, especially her front room window where she sat all day, tethered to her oxygen tank. So, after she was gone, her son who lives there now, took away the feeders and he said the hummingbirds looked in the window at him all the time. He still didn’t put the feeders back. So I decided to buy some feeders starting in 2020 – one hummingbird, a female, I named Hope. He claims the hummingbirds still look in the window at him wondering where their food is. I said “give them a map to next door.” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. ruthsoaper says:

    Great pictures Linda. I’ve never seen an owl. So especially enjoyed those.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ruth – I hope to see an owl one day, so in the meantime, that’s the closest I likely will be to one. I was happy to find out Radar and Hawkeye weren’t injured, but having their routine exam. I am surprised you don’t see or hear one at the farm – not enough trees for them to perch/hide or you’re not at the farm in the dusk or dark?

      Like

  10. Laurie says:

    I loved reading about your encounters with Radar and Hawkeye! It’s cool that injured birds have a haven. 15 years is a long time for a bird to live in activity!

    There is a trail near my house that has a fairy garden like the one you saw. I think they even have a website.

    Now I am wondering if you saw Billy at the Lake Huron Metropark since that was your destination. Good cliffhanger, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked the post including the cliffhanger Laurie and at least if I never come face to face, er … beak, with an owl in the woods, at least I saw one here. Radar is pretty big, has intense eyes and feathery “horns” – it’s a shame he was injured permanently, just like Hawkeye. When I first began walking, it was in the ‘hood only and someone had a fairy house midway up the tree and the base of the tree had a natural hole and the homeowner put a white set of stairs that went up the side of the tree to the little house. I never took a photo of it, but should have.

      No Billy at Lake Huron Metropark, but you’ll meet “Buzzy” – hope it doesn’t disappoint as it’s only a cameo appearance. 🙂

      Like

  11. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda……………………………that was an enjoyable walk through Oakwoods Metropark………………….you are an adventurous story teller

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Joni says:

    What a good day you had Linda…..you always discover i It’s interesting such interesting creatures! I loved the chipmunks – I’ve never seen one, but imagined them as bigger. I would love to see any owl – even a captive one. My mom painted a series of 3 or 4 owl paintings – if I could manage to see a real one, it would make a nice Wordless Wednesday. It’s nice to see all the greenery in the middle of drab and colorless January.

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    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was an exciting trip to Oakwoods Metropark Joni, especially after the kind of blah Willow Metropark. That’s the first time I saw an owl up close because Radar’s enclosure if fairly big and he sits way in the back – I come home with golden dots and that’s it. I hope you find an owl then Joni – do you have any nature centers that might have them or rehabbed animal rescue centers? We have a big nature center for rehabbed animals in Howell, Michigan, but that is nowhere near me. It’s going to be white only after tomorrow – even more drab and colorless. (I keep forgetting to tell you that the lawsuit for the painting by the owner was dismissed by the judge and the painting’s alleged owner has filed an appeal.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        There’s a residence owl (Ollie) in the park I blogged about last fall, as lots of people go birding in the park, but you have to be there really early in the morning at dusk or dawn and that would be impossible for me right now. I do have a newspaper clipping of a picture of four baby owelettes, that someone took last year in their backyard, so they are around. Last year when we had more snow, there were quite a few sightings of snowy owls. I would never have that much luck. We have an animal rehab place somewhere, an hours drive away, but I’m not sure where it is, it’s mostly injured abandoned animals I think. PS. Thanks for the update re the painting.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        How come I don’t remember that post Joni? I’m sorry as I didn’t think I missed any? That is what I understand about owls too and I don’t like driving in the dark, nor being out in the dark for that matter. I won’t go in the backyard in the dark anymore, especially since Marge’s son showed me a picture of two raccoons in his garbage bin the night we were outside with the fire. There are night-time walks at this park you can sign up for. They are called an “Owl Prowl” and I meant to mention them when writing about Radar. The group leaves the Nature Center in the dark, each person carrying a lantern and they go into the woods to look for owls. Now that sounds like it would be fun, but I know there are snakes in the Metroparks. I have not written yet about the Eastern Fox Snake I saw at Lake Erie Metropark in September. It was big, but I didn’t get a picture of it. I was walking on a woodsy path and it slithered by my foot … nearly had a heart attack and jumped back – next thing it was in the bushes out of sights.

        We got 5.5 inches of wet, heavy snow – I shoveled this morning and an inch of snow was heavy, but I didn’t go out again as it was snowing so hard and I dread to see what mess the plow will make at the end of the driveway. If it’s too heavy, I’ll just do the City sidewalk and a path for the mailman. You’re welcome – I’ll keep you updated if you want as to the appeal. The appeal process can take awhile, but maybe it will be expedited.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        An owl prowl sounds like fun! and safe enough with a group. I think I just mentioned the resident owl in a Wordless Wed. post – I thought it was in A Walk in the Park but can’t find it now. Maybe the snakes would be sleeping at night, or if you went in the winter, under the snow? We had about 6 inches, but my neighbour used his snowblower yesterday late afternoon, there may be a bit more now but it’s melting and the road looks okay so I may go in search of snowmen and photos.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Joni – I just went onto your site and looked for it and you did mention the animal farm was closed in that post. As I scrolled down I knew if I missed it, it was because of the beautiful leaves and Mr. Chubs. When I got to the end of the post it said to “follow” you. So, I am following you, but I guess that was via e-mail. Hmm. I had to do the snow in layers but didn’t finish the end part of the driveway as I just pushed the driveway apron snow there and left it as the plow would be coming along, which it did right after I finished … I was disgusted with the mess and came inside to have something to eat before I started work. I will deal with it another time. That snow was heavy without having street snow there to do too. The driveway cleared to the cement as it got sunny later – looked out and was surprised, but we are having a snow squall in the next hour and more snow every day, especially this weekend. The neighbor across the street had a snowman, but no accessories, just stick arms, or I may have walked over there with the camera. The owl prowl does sound nice, right down to the lanterns along the path. I also don’t like spiders – it would make me nervous walking along that woodsy path.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I think the owl might have been in an earlier post, but it was just a brief mention that I would like to return to the park sometime to look for it.

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  13. Rebecca says:

    What cute photos of the chipmunk! I’ve seen some out west, but never around here. Love the little fairy cottage and hummingbirds! You had a very interesting walk. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was so happy to see those chipmunks Rebecca. We don’t have them at Council Point Park – too bad, they are so cute. That fairy cottage was a treat to see too – good thing I happened to look up and see it. Whomever made that fairy cottage had to have taken a ladder into the woods to do so! It was a fun walk with lots to see.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Congratulations! Those are amazing chipmunk shots! I’ve never gotten a picture of one sitting up on its hind legs like these are. 😊 So cute. I love that little fairy cottage high up in the tree! It was interesting seeing them restrain the owl for his vet exam. And that’s a nice picture of Radar’s perch and those penetrating eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was excited to see these Chipmunks Barbara – so cute! I’m lucky they suddenly appeared from the gap in the concrete where the overlook was listing. That fairy cottage was really high up in that tree and I’m sure someone had to take a ladder into the forest to do that. I thought it was interesting watching the vet as well. Radar finally calmed down after all the wing-flapping and talons extended – the poor vet looked exasperated with Hawkeye. I felt badly for both of them. Radar’s eyes seem to glow in the dark don’t they?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, his eyes are as fluorescent yellow as that caution tape!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You’re right about that Barbara – those eyes just penetrate your soul. You wonder what animals that once roamed free and now live in captivity feel – do they think about what happened to get them there? Retrace it in their minds like a person would do? Birds are so intelligent. There is a Bald Eagle at Lake Erie Metropark who is blind in one eye and its wing is damaged and non-functioning. Luc sits on its perch, a very occasional chirp from him if I’m early and say his name, maybe the first person to visit that day, but that is rare. He gets his white rat or white rabbit and often leaves it there on the stump where they place it, not even hurrying to eat it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I also wonder about the quality of life for these birds who cannot be released because of their injuries. What goes through their minds? Although, my sense is that most animals accept life as they find it and don’t agonize over other possibilities the way we humans often do.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I think our love for nature and wild animals probably lets us (you/me) think more deeply about how they perceive their situations. I know birds are very intelligent though – much more intelligent than people give them credit for, thus I’ve never understood people giving them the moniker of “bird brain”. The story on Nottingham about the rescue of the deer and removal of the pumpkin candy carrier was on our news last night and today. Poor thing had not eaten in two months – no wonder it bolted so quickly.

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  15. I love the fairy cottage Linda! What a fun post except for the crumbling deck! I want that hut in my backyard, the grandkids would love it! I have never realized, from the front, how much the chipmunk looks like a squirrel!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I did too Diane and it was really high up on a tree so I was lucky I happened to look up. The grandchildren would like this bark hut. I liked the pics of the chipmunks standing up instead of on all fours like I used in my end-of-year recap. They do like a squirrel, specially the Eastern Gray squirrels with the white tummies.

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