Hmm – It sure is hard to get traction …

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… on the ice, or regarding my walking regimen.  Grrrr!

We’ve got another crummy weather day here in Southeast Michigan.  The rain has been falling since last evening.  The weather folks tell us we’ll get up to two inches of rain that has the nerve to morph into snow flurries and accumulate maybe an inch before dawn.

To add insult to injury, today is “National Take a Walk in the Park Day” so needless to say I didn’t celebrate this event.

All was not lost as I slept in (much too late, when left to my own devices by electing not to set the alarm clock), however, this soggy Saturday allowed me to finally spin out a post about my trek to Lake Erie Metropark one week ago today.  I’ve been swamped at work and eked out one post this week, and I am sorely behind in social media correspondence, not to mention catching up with fellow blogger’s posts in Reader.

Roaming along the coastline of Cove Point.

When I left the house last Saturday, it was just 23 degrees F (-5 C), but the car needed a long run and I needed a change of pace, so Lake Erie Metropark was my go-to spot.  I left the peanuts at home as they have signs everywhere that it is forbidden to feed any wildlife at the park.  Go figure, because I’m sure any of the feathered or furry friends that crossed my path would have loved a peanut, but I’m not paying any fines or risking being prohibited for returning to the park for breaking their rules.  The critters at this venue don’t pay you any attention because they know better than to beg, or even hint, for treats.  Sad isn’t it?  I sure hope there was/is plenty for them to forage to stay alive, especially after the brutally cold Winter we’ve just endured.

Speaking of cold weather, it was officially the first weekend of Spring, but you sure wouldn’t have known it if you saw how I was bundled up, because most of my trek would be along the Lake Erie shoreline and it’s always colder down by the water.  I donned a down jacket, Sherpa-lined hat and wore many layers, not to mention that I had gloves with liners, to take photos and my fingers were still cold.

There were very few people out on this frosty morning and the first person I saw was this young woman who jogged past me in short shorts and a light hoodie.

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Now one of us did not dress properly for the cold weather and maybe there should have been a happy medium?  I grew up hearing the expression “wear lots of layers as it’s always easier to remove an article of clothing, than wish you had worn something warmer” … (so am I just an old fuddy duddy with all my layers of clothing … never mind, don’t answer that).

I really wondered what was going on in the distance and I strained my eyes to see, but I suspect it was some type of dredging operation.

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Icey and dicey AGAIN.

Just like Heritage Park the weekend before, the frozen ground was unable to soak up all the rain we’d had, so pools of water had gathered in low-lying areas.

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Unfortunately, the rainwater had also spilled over the cement walkway making large patches of glare ice.

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I had hoped to avoid an icy trail walk by concentrating on this venue’s winding cement pathway, but that was not the case, so I spent more time navigating around the icy patches and walking on the half-frozen grass.

Oh well, a walk along the Lake Erie shoreline was pleasant enough.

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Not all the Canada geese were enjoying a chilly swim in Lake Erie.  A few decided to try out one of these makeshift mini-lakes as their own personal pond.  So how did that work out?  Well let’s take a look below.

A closer inspection of the icy surface proved to be no dice on the ice for this goose, who took a quick gander, then walked away.

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With a whir of wings, it soon took flight to join its brethren I had just passed while walking along Cove Point’s shoreline.

Yet, there was something about this sparkling pool of water that remained a lure from high above.

A bum steer.

Descending from the sky with loud honks, these two Canada geese, though synchronized and graceful in the sky, were rather klutzy when they arrived feet first, as their wide-webbed feet met the unforgiving surface, and in short order their feathery bums thwacked against the ice.  Clearly they were not happy with this particular polar plunge.

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And how pleasant could it be to stand in thigh-high water?

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But, there they were, and glancing up in the sky perhaps to warn any others of this bum steer?

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Alas, they decided to make the most of their personal pond, though I’m sure they regretted the decision to descend into this icy mess.

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Meandering around the marshes.

After completing a trek along the three-mile (5 km) shoreline, I next headed to the opposite side of this massive Park where the marshes and lagoons are located.

I parked by the Marshlands Museum and stopped to say “hi” to Luc, the resident eagle …

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… before heading onto the Cherry Island Trail, which, not surprisingly, was a little icy in spots.  The trail is uneven to begin with, so with ice on it, I opted to switch between the paved road that goes to the boat launch area and then walk along the wooden overlooks.

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There is nothing like the trill of the Red-Winged Blackbirds as they fly about the marshy portions of this large park.  They are large birds and their voices seemed to echo as I walked along in the still morn.  These birds are quick to follow you along the perimeter path at Council Point Park, but not for the sake of companionship – they merely want a peanut and they’ve been known to hop down in front of me or swipe one from right underneath a squirrel’s nose.

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There were plenty of waterfowl in the lagoon area, including a pair of swans that glided effortlessly through the water, alternating between paddling and diving for breakfast.

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They posed for me …

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… and, I even got a half-hearted pose; unfortunately, they would not arch their necks to make a complete heart.

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The trail continued to the boat launch area.

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I noticed the buoys were still piled on the deck and a few boaters already had their pride and joy ready to take a spin on Lake Erie .

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I had walked for miles and would have welcomed a little sit-down …

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…but I intended to stop at Dingell Park to see if the eagles were still there, so I departed this park, cold and hungry, but with rosy cheeks and a rosier disposition.

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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81 Responses to Hmm – It sure is hard to get traction …

  1. Michael says:

    You will get your spring eventually. How amazing is that photo of the Swans you so nearly got the perfect heart-shaped swan-neck photograph

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hello, Linda! Looks like you had an adventurous day. Although it may have been pretty darn chilly, to say the least, Your pictures show nothing but pure beauty of nature that surrounds you. Gorgeous photo’s! 🤗

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Beckie – it was a beautiful day last Saturday morning and I don’t mind the cold as long as there is no snow or ice. I try to dress for it. It is a beautiful park and I’m eager to see it once again when it greens up – we are a long way from there and probably have just as crummy weather as you do. In fact I heard the long-range weather forecast calling for a Nor’easter next week on the East Coast… I don’t think it was an April Fool’s joke either. Glad you liked the photos and I was hoping those swans would get it together and give me a perfect heart but they did not decide to do that – more interested in each other – sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dang! I didn’t even hear about that storm yet. I was just in awe over today’s weather here in Jersey Land. 75 degrees. I was happy just hearing it was gonna reach 70, but 75 felt so refreshing and I felt so alive. Every window was wide open and fresh air circulating was so enjoyable.
        I hope the future Nor’easter is an April Fools Joke.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I hope so too for your sake Beckie – we used to compare notes on our Winter weather and yours was always worse than here in Michigan… you have to wonder how you could have such nice weather today than THAT next week. I think Mother Nature has a bee in her bonnet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I have to agree with you. Mother Nature is playing and messing with us quite a bit over the years. Then again, I don’t blame her one bit.
        Hope you have a pleasant evening, Linda. It’s time for me to shut down for the night.
        Take care! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’d like to return to the good old days with our weather. Nice chatting with you Beckie – have a good night and take care. I’ll cross my fingers Mother Nature has a change of heart about that Nor’Easter.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Rebecca says:

    Loved the slip-sliding goose and the beautiful swans. Your walks are always interesting!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Rebecca … he looked like he was having a tough go of it (much like us humans walking on the ice – me anyway). Those swans were so beautiful and I don’t always see swans, but saw them at that park, then later in the day when I went down to the Detroit River and they were in the alcove. Glad you enjoyed the photos … that trip made up for this soggy Saturday.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Dear Miss Rosy cheeks………………………………………..that is the coolest picture of the pair of swans that you took………………………its ready for a postcard!

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Ann Marie – I stood there hoping that they would complete the heart. I was already planning on using it for the top picture of this blog post, but they were more interested in each other than me taking a picture. It was a good swan day – I saw swans there and then again at Dingell Park.

      I’m glad I got out a long time last Saturday as today was a washout and now a “snow out” – it is snowing at Metro Airport last newcast I heard.

      Like

  5. My crazy son took his boat out fishing last week too. You are so fortunate to live by so many parks! The news at 6:00 pm said we could get up to 5″ of snow by tomorrow….NOOOOOOOO! I sure hope they’re wrong!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      There were several boaters at this park as well as Dingell Park last Saturday. There are many other parks around here, within driving distance … like half hour to an hour, that I haven’t tried yet but aim to this Summer – I’ll get the most out of my Metropark pass and state park pass I got when I renewed my driver’s license. I wanted to go last year and we had so many rainy weekends … lovely rainy days like today. I was complaining about an inch of snow – 5 inches of snow for you! You have my sympathies Diane. That’s crazy weather.

      Liked by 1 person

      • What????? You need a pass to go into the parks?

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      • lindasschaub says:

        The Metroparks have a $35.00 fee per year, or $10.00 per day (the daily fee is expensive in my opinion) and you can get a senior discount after 60 years old I believe, but there is not always someone at the little booth that you must pass to get into the Park. So I ordered it online back in late 2018 so I had it if I went out in January. There are a lot of Metroparks, not all around me, the furthest maybe 1 1/2 from here. The first time I went there over 4th of July last year, no one was at the gate – I thought it was an information booth and just drove through. I didn’t know they charged until I was talking to a walker there – that was a surprise. They have park police all the time – I am lucky they did not give me a fine. The state parks, I bought a “passport” which is part of my driver’s license renewal … it was $11.00 last year and I never used it … I think I paid $12.00 this year. Our registration fees went up a lot a few years ago to fix the roads – now they want to add a $0.45 gas tax in $0.15 per gallon increments over 18 months … people are protesting, but that is more fair than adding to the registration fee. Of course I work from home, but I still drive, but our insurance is very high here too – we are the only state in the U.S. that charges drivers with a catastrophic insurance fee which MUST be paid. It is a fund for drivers who have catastrophic accidents … they will raise it next month and it will be $220.00 per vehicle, per year!

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  6. Fred Bailey says:

    Your blog is another hit!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Fred – it was a beautiful sunny day to enjoy that trek. I hated to come home but I didn’t want to overdo the walking (I’d gone 6 miles) and besides, my oatmeal was in my toes!

      Like

  7. Joni says:

    That was a great post! Those swan pictures are the absolute best. It must have been a shock for that goose to discover the water was ice. It’s sad you can’t feed any of the wildlife there, as it certainly looks very barren and bleak, and not a speck of green yet. Do you think they enforce it? I guess they don’t want them to get used to treats, but it seems cruel.

    Liked by 2 people

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Joni – I waited and waited on that swan couple to make a perfect heart but no way – they were going to do it. It was so peaceful that morning … birds, ducks and swans. Sometimes there are herons and egrets, but not lately when I’ve gone when it is so cold. I watched those geese come in for a landing and it was a shock, though you’d think the ice would be evident from the sun glinting on it – but no, they saw it as they got right on top of it. It was not deep enough or frozen solid enough they would have hurt themselves but they were surprised. I went on a couple of that park’s interpretive tours last Summer and I mentioned feeding the squirrels and the interpretive tour guide said it was not good to feed wild animals as they get dependent on food and if you’re not there they might go up to someone else and attack them because they are hungry. I can’t see that even though the squirrels are pretty pushy. You feed them all the time, they expect food all the time. If I walk into the park and am interrupted by someone and a squirrel comes along and is not fed, they start dancing around, even will try to climb up to reach the bag. I like feeding them and interacting with them, but some walkers don’t like them or are afraid of them. This park guide also told me that people were feeding the deer. I saw deer one time, the morning I went on the tours as the first one started at 8:00 a.m. Apparently people come in the car, feed buckets of corn to the deer who come running out to get it. But the people don’t come every day, the deer won’t forage for food as they expect the handout … that is their reasoning, but I’m sure peanuts for the squirrels won’t hurt them. You and I had the same long, brutally cold Winter … perhaps our ground is not frozen solid anymore, but we are going to the 20s tonight … they can’t dig up their buried food yet I’m sure. They need to eat.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. susieshy45 says:

    Linda,
    A great post. People like you get us thinking about things we take for granted – that wild animals manage somehow in nature and they don’t need man’s helping hand. I believe like you that once in a while it is good to give out a handout. Of course, sometimes animals get dependent on handouts like humans too. I remember the Presidential candidate Mitt Romney got routed of the race when he talked about citizens who got too used to handouts.
    I would hand things out to the fowl and furries too if I were there.
    I am sure in heaven, there are cheers going up every time you feed a someone less fortunate than you and I mean it seriously.
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I agree with you Susie, not everyone is fortunate enough to make it on their own, whether they are man or beast. I cannot see the issue and when the tour guide said that my little Park squirrels would go into some type of attack mode if I didn’t show up and they saw a human didn’t resonate with me. I just couldn’t see it – maybe if they were rabid, but I will tell you they are persistent. If I don’t feed them as I am taking a picture for instance, they will dance around or try to jump up until I feed them. The porch pets are also waiting until I open the door which I will do in a few minutes – they have come to depend on the food, just like your feral cats depend on you. But I won’t feed any critters there – I don’t want to be banned from the Park or fined. Another crummy morning – I’d hold off until later to go out but we had some snow and wintry precip, there are accidents and some black ice on the roads, so the sidewalks will be the same. Maybe tomorrow for the first of April. Sigh.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. alison41 says:

    I loved all the puns! and the pics, too. I can’t even begin to imagine a lake the vastness of Lake Eerie. South Africa has no natural lakes, only man-made Dams, used for water storage/supply. And, P.S. I know just what yo9u mean about catching up with social e-mails and WP Reader posts. Time, oh time. Or: lack thereof.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      You are the only one who caught the puns Alison. Glad you enjoyed them and the pictures as well. Lake Erie is actually the biggest of the Great Lakes … it is part of several different states. It is nice on that walk along the shoreline with the big boulders, but more beautiful once everything has greened up – that will be a while yet as we had snow last night. Not alot, but enough (1 1/2 inches). In the Summer, parts of Lake Erie and some of the lagoons in this park have beautiful water lotuses. They cluster in beds and are beautiful come late July and August. There are two main lotus beds, about two and five acres in size and the largest one is right near the rocks. You can see them in this post: https://lindaschaubblog.net/2018/08/04/lovely-lotuses/

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        Linda, I think Lake Superior is the largest followed by Michigan then Huron then Erie is fourth largest. I’m not sure how much it matters as they are all very large bodies of water.
        Love the swan pictures ♥

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Hi Alison – I stand corrected by Ruth, who is a fellow Michigander. I should have known that Lake Superior is the largest of the Great Lakes, and someone at Lake Erie Metropark told me this fact and I just took their word for it. We can agree that Lake Erie is bigger than your bodies of water, since you only have man-made lakes. Thanks Ruth for the clarification.

        Like

  10. Laurie says:

    Glad to read that you got some miles in, even if they did entail navigating around the frozen spots on the path. I hope your feet stayed dry! I have been wondering about the reduced volume of posts coming from you. Thanks for providing your readers with an explanation. I forget what’s it like to be swamped with work. I hope that doesn’t last too long for you, Linda.

    The woman you saw jogging was probably plenty warm even in just shorts and a light hoodie. I am cold-blooded, so I usually dress warmer than many runners, but my running friend Al wears shorts for any run when it is above 32 degrees!

    I ran a race in Ontario once (a marathon) where we ran from the town of Mississauga down to Lake Erie, then ran on a path along Lake Erie for a while. I rained the whole race (it was in May), and I was completely underdressed in a short-sleeved shirt and shorts. When we got to the path beside the lake, the wind was blowing so hard, waves were crashing over the path, and all I could think of were my dry, warm clothes waiting for me at the finish line. Maybe that was incentive to run a little bit faster! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Well that makes me feel better Laurie – I thought I perhaps was overdressed as I was becoming an old fuddy duddy and also as I had left the house with around the same combination of clothes since November! When I am out walking longer periods of time on the weekend, I wear the down jacket. I had a squall jacket I usually wear all Winter, but at the beginning of the cold weather, I was surprised (even horrified) to discover that I could not get in and out of that jacket, not only because it was so heavy on my sore shoulder, but also because it was lined in polar fleece and would not “move/glide” over my clothes. I am wearing a coat of my mom’s but it has small pockets and smaller than my usual size – I like roominess and lots of pockets for carryiung the camera, peanuts, keys, etc. I’ve felt like a fish out of water all through the cold-weather season.

      I have not posted as much this Winter due to several things – the weather was icier than normal and the glare ice, not just a few icy patches here and there. On the advice of a fellow blogger, I bought a pair of crampons – the metal teeth in them would grip any snowy/icy patches when walking around the park on the grounds, but not good for glare ice and you can’t walk on asphalt or cement with them. Also, I have been very busy at work and not getting here as early as I’d like at night. I’ve fought to stay caught up in Reader, which you probably noticed as I was behind getting to two of your last posts. I tried staying away from the computer more (easier said than done believe me) to give myself a break from my posture here. I believe the shoulder/arm issue I’ve been having is ergonomic related … I’ve researched the issue and tried to sit a different way, reconfigured my laptop to use a separate keyboard – it has helped somewhat. I have very little pain now and it seems to have gravitated to the crook of my arm, not my upper shoulder like last November, but I have no range of motion in that arm and that is troubling.
      I should have started the ergonomic practices a long time before this and it is hard to train yourself to sit upright when you’ve bent over, even hunched over a laptop for so many years. I have been following some exercises from two physical therapists on the internet, Bob and Brad (www.bobandbrad.com) to help as well.

      I can see how you would have run fast with the wind and cold air and waves crashing – we had such a cold Spring last year and I believe it is going to be like this another few weeks.

      Like

  11. When we get “too much” rain our local park floods and large fields have ponds on them. It doesn’t take long for the geese and ducks to have a field day with their new swimming hole! I always get a kick out of watching them make the most of nature.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes these geese were funny to watch … the landing, walking and slip-slidin’ away. The last time I was there I saw many ducks doing the same thing – they were making me smile because they were diving for aquatic plants and it couldn’t have been more than a foot deep, and only grass, nothing to eat.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Swans always look so graceful! We had some of them where I grew up in Germany. They built their nests right in the middle of a pedestrian path winding along the Rhine river. You’d have to walk way around them though, because they can be quite mean and attack people. I hope the weather warms up for you so that you can get out anytime you feel like a walk! 🙂 Happy Spring, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      After the run-in with the swan last year, I steer clear of them too Sabine. I do likewise with the geese. They are fractious sometimes, especially with the goslings in tow. It was very cold this morning and we had snow last night. It only collected on the grass so I was able to get outside and get in a walk – very, very cold. I got some pictures of the cardinal in the tree out front and the Park as well. And I got a lot of squirrel photos … they were glad to see me, though I was just there Friday, but it was bitter cold this morning, and an all-day rain yesterday so likely no one showed up at the Park. Our ground is still frozen – they are unable to access their hidden treats. I will remind myself it is Spring – after today, I was not sure it was Spring or an imposter!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda, another blogger from Michigan said this morning that she awoke to 5 inches of snow! I have to confess that I went outside in a light sweater at 7 am today and drank my coffee as I watched the sun come up! It was nippy, and so peaceful. I am certain your spring is coming shortly! It has to! Cardinals are such beautiful birds. We saw some in Hawaii. That surprised me as I thought they were just back east! And that’s the only time be ever seen them. You are a kind soul to keep the critters tied over until the ground thaws!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Wow – we were lucky then at just 1 1/2 inches of snow and we are getting more snow Wednesday night into Thursday morning … same amount as yesterday. A fellow blogger from Ohio said they were expecting 5 inches of snow on Saturday night so she probably got it as well. Your pictures yesterday were so pretty and peaceful … I’ll dream a little longer about the arrival of the “real Spring” not just the calendar date. The Northern Cardinals are the prettiest birds in my opinion, although our Blue Jays are stunning as well. A cardinal in Hawaii must have taken a wrong turn – he followed directions like I do – not very well! Someone at the Park said feeding the peanuts on the porch would bring rats … so that worries me a little, and I researched it, but I can’t see it personally and will look into it a little more as I don’t want to cut them off, but I will keep them going at least through April.

        Liked by 1 person

      • A friend of mine used to put out sunflower seeds until she saw a rat inside her feeder one day. This was in California. I put out seeds, but have never seen a rat. We do however get mice, which in my opinion is unavoidable next to the woods.
        Cardinals are stunning! I hope the snow isn’t going to be too bad!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, mice are unavoidable even in the City. I was very careful where I kept my seed in the basement. I stored it in two Rubbermaid containers – one inside the other one. I was concerned for moths in the house and I didn’t want to be dropping seeds anywhere around the house to entice mice. I had the feeders in the backyard, far enough away from the house. Now that surprises me about rats eating sunflower seeds. That would be disturbing to see. I have bushes near the porch – I suppose the rats could hide in there. I won’t try to come up with a solution until it gets warmer. I have a small feeder I had for years – it is just a pole with a resin dish that looks like leaves – I suppose I could put that somewhere away from the house, but the squirrels couldn’t access it, just the birds. I wish the guy had not mentioned it to me.

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      • Linda, you could test it out by putting out just a little bit of seeds and peanuts while keeping a close eye on it! And maybe just during the worst part of winter. I’m sure you’ll figure out a good solution for your garden! 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’m going to try Sabine – I really enjoy seeing the critters come for a visit … our Spring is so cold thus far, I’m sure the ground is frozen and they cannot get to any food. I wonder how the robins are surviving … all the critters have had it rough. I like the idea of the little feeder which is raised off the ground enough for the birds to swoop by.

        Liked by 1 person

      • If you have any bird shops where you are, visit them for local advice. I hang mine from stakes and add squirrel baffles, except they (the squirrels) are never baffled! 😂 In no time they figure out to outsmart me. Since we don’t have harsh weather like you, I try to keep them at bay. In the past we’ve gotten too many which I don’t like because they get disruptive. What would cardinals eat besides your peanuts?

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I never thought of that Sabine – it’s a good idea. My former HVAC guy had a dream to open a Wild Birds Unlimited Store and quit his job to do this. His wife, initially cool to the idea, ended up quitting her job and helps him there. They didn’t buy an existing WBU store, so they remodeled a store and started from scratch. I e-mailed him when I saw the story in the local paper and it gave some contact info and follow them on Facebook. I had promised to stop in – that might be a good opportunity to ask my question then. Yes, the squirrels have a workaround for everything. Years ago a former neighbor enjoyed woodworking and made me a log cabin feeder and mounted it on a tall PVC pipe/pole. He said “it’s too slippery for the squirrels to climb up” … wrong. He put it in the middle of the yard, not near the shed, any trees, or the patio awning – they would take a flying leap off the chain-link fence and land up top, where they lifted the hinged lid and dug right in. This was before the internet was around and I went to a pet store/feed store and asked for suggestions. “Buy this red pepper mixture to mix with the seeds as the birds don’t mind it but squirrels don’t like it – it won’t harm them and they’ll leave the seeds alone.” Nope, that didn’t work either. I fed the cardinals sunflower seeds years ago, and safflower seeds to one female cardinal. These cardinals don’t like safflower seeds – I put some out on the porch when I was running out of peanuts about six weeks ago … a few spent seeds were around, but most of them remained untouched. Tom Peace said I shouldn’t feed them peanuts due to a fungal infection they could get, but I buy people peanuts and feel they are a reputable company. But I did try alternatives as Tom suggested – the birds wanted peanuts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Squirrels are masters of working around barriers of any kind in order to get to the food! I watch them every day do the seemingly impossible. As to the cardinals, perhaps if there is only safflower seed available perhaps they’ll go for it. It might take a bit of time for them to adjust. Good luck!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I thought they’d go for it when I had to limit the peanuts once my supply got low after the ice storm , but I figure they knew peanuts would be there eventually. People underestimate how birds think – their brains are much more complex than how people perceive them, i.e. a “bird brain”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Or eating like a bird! 😂 They clearly must not watch them!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Maybe they like variety – look at what happens at the Park – cardinals, jays and red-winged blackbirds, all swooping down for nuts when the squirrels aren’t watching their little pile. Variety is the spice of life for them it seems.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes! I would have never thought that the chipmunks would go for thistle seed, but they do. They take turns up on the feeder! Other birds like it too. Plus there is one woodpecker who lands on all the feeders and checks out what is offered! Variety is good – for all of us!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes variety is good – it would take a lot of thistle seeds to fill up a chipmunk’s stomach. Though I’ve never seen one, they have to be bigger than a bird! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m trying to get a few posts ready! And the size depends on the bird! They are however great fun to watch! Super fast and agile and polite with each other! 🐿

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’ve fallen behind with posting due to my work schedule and the weather. The post I did yesterday would have been done for Monday night but it was late and the caption editor was not working, so I deferred it to Tuesday. I worked late again tonight. I missed National Walking Day yesterday – totally forgot about it and I usually rely on my memory because it is always the first Wednesday in April.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I haven’t been posting as much either. Sometimes life just gets busy. Soon the weather will be nice and you can get outside after work since it’s light until late.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes that is true – I usually go in the morning, even on the weekend … on the weekend I’ll go in the afternoon only if the weather is bad earlier just to get the miles in. It is quieter for walking, taking pictures – more critters venturing out. I’ve walked at Council Point Park when the days are longer and I missed a morning walk – no critters around, not even a bird. All you see is humans. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s true! The early squirrel gets the peanut! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Even if I stop on the way back from another Park, it is rare to have any interaction with them. I think they forage and return to their nests.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Your peanuts, Linda, are (i’m sure) high-grade and very decent peanuts. 🙂 However, there are a lot of people out there who purchase cheap stuff (because it is inexpensive in this day and age) and they figure that it’s good enough for outdoor critters. Trouble is, a lot of the cheaper stuff can easily harbor small amounts of mold that amount to (and carry) Aspergillus flavus… and that can easily kill birds (even large birds) and cause real havoc. Sometimes those rules and mandates are for a good reason.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Hi Tom – yes, I know we discussed this before. I bought all the safflower seeds and they would touch them, they steal the peanuts from the squirrels – they did it on my porch and they do it at the Park. You’ll see that in my post I just published a short time ago. I do buy the best peanuts – in fact they are “Hampton’s” jumbo unsalted peanuts. I don’t buy the loose peanuts (they don’t have them anyway) as they are often dirty. The interpretive guide told me that it was a real problem with the deer and the deer would not forage for themselves, instead standing at the spot where the people come to feed them on the weekend, so they decided to forbid feeding the critters all across the board. I know … I worry about them too. Last week I worried about the sparrows – had no bird seed, so took them a healthy mix like I have in my cereal and some seeded whole-grain bread. I bought all that birdseed for the birds at Christmas and put it on trays at the Park and the squirrels ate most of the seed bells and sunflower seeds … I love the squirrels, but they are greedy as anyone knows who has ever had a birdfeeder. They misappropriate everything for their own use and benefit.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, squirrels do hog it all for themselves. At my mother-in-law’s assistive living home they mischievously messed around with the bird feeder so much that it ended up crashing to the ground. Now i just put the seed on the ground and the birds have to wait until the squirrels get satiated (which takes a long time).
        We evolved from a proto-primate (Purgatorius) that looked a lot like today’s squirrels (and humans remain mischievous and greedy too). 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yesterday when a cardinal scammed a peanut from under the squirrel’s nose, the look on the squirrel’s face was priceless, like “how could you do this to me?” Yet, we both know the squirrels will stuff themselves silly on birdseed while the birds perch nearby with sad looks on their faces. (The name of the peanuts is not “Hampton’s” but “Hampton Farms” – after I shut down my computer, I saw a bag and realized I was in error.)

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  14. Mackenzie says:

    Oh man- I was hoping you could skip that whole “rain stage” and go straight to daily sunshine! I’m so sorry you missed “Take a walk in the park” day .. although I do have to say I love the name hehe, but I’d say you celebrate it all year long 🙂

    So sad you can’t feed the little guys at that park 😦

    Oh my word! That picture of the swans could be a post card. So sweet.

    Thank you for sharing, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked the swans Mackenzie – I was patiently waiting for the full heart as opposed to a lopsided, half-hearted pose, but it didn’t happen. They were more interested in one another. Well, the rain morphed into snow, we had 1 1/2 inches of snow Saturday into Sunday, just on the grass, so I got a walk in. We are getting a little more snow Wednesday night – no putting the snow boots or snow shovels away yet.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mackenzie says:

        Aw man! I saw pictures from Friends and fam in OH and it looks like they had another blizzard too . *Sigh*. Hopefully Spring will make it’s way there soon for good!

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        A blizzard is just unspeakable for the end of March isn’t it – enough already Mother Nature! Our snow melted and now everyone is aflutter because Opening Day is Thursday and we have some snow coming Wednesday night. SMH

        Liked by 1 person

  15. you have as many adventures as I do Linda! Thanks for going to see Luc.He remembers you I’m sure. Loved the swan shots! I think they and the geese were making out.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, I had a great day that time too, just like you, making the most of my trek. Luc will get more visits, once the snow and ice leaves … whenever that is. The snow melted yesterday, but we are getting a little more Wednesday night. Glad you liked the swan shots … patience is a virtue when you want something to happen as you well know, and I waited and waited, hoping those two swans would do better than just a lopsided heart when they arched their necks, but, as you pointed out, they were more interested in each other than me! I couldn’t ply them with peanuts either and I had no fish or plants to offer them.

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      • you’ll get that heart sooner or later

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I hope so – I’d better go back during mating season when they are staring so intensely at each other, bill to bill.

        Like

      • and try to be mindful of the background

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      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, that too. They were fairly close to me and the sun was at a bad angle. When I finally got out of the direct sun, they had drifted off further into the lagoon. They sure are beautiful birds. There was a story on the news about a pair of nesting Canada Geese and one attacked a man. The warning was “geese are nesting – stay clear” – you remember we commented on that recently? https://www.wxyz.com/news/beware-geese-spotted-attacking-people-on-eastern-michigan-university-campus

        Like

      • a pair of Ravens nested on Morpheus island.Thats where Maggie likes to hang out. They chased he away every time.
        Every bird nesting right now is very protective of its perceived territory.
        The ravens built inside Maggie’s territory,they moved on once their chicks were fully fledged.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        You would think a smaller bird would be aware of an eagle’s territory – perhaps that pair were new to the area? They gave the warning again on the news this morning about the pair of geese. The video was not clear but apparently it was a student they chased. Someone must have had their cellphone out to capture it. Last year there was a guy golfing and he got too close to a Canada Goose nest and the male chased him down, flew up on him and knocked him to the ground. It made the rounds on social media around here. His golfing buddy thought it was funny and recorded the whole episode on his phone. The guy was not hurt (just his pride). Everyone thought it was funny. I didn’t having heard this story years ago. I may have told you about the blue jays across the street from me many years ago? A man was walking down the street – evidently passed under the maple tree where the blue jays had a nest (don’t know if it was just eggs or hatchlings) … the blue jay attacked him with a vengeance … he only walked beneath the tree, no threat at all. The man was bald – the jay pecked his head, and flew about his head acting wild and he fell to the ground where the bird continued to peck his head. Blood all over. The woman in the house called for an ambulance as he was laying on the sidewalk clearly out of it. She had the windows open and heard the man screaming out. She saw the attack and told my mom about it. He later came back to thank her … he said “I did nothing” and this is a reason I worry a little about cutting off the birds since a couple of jays are involved – I’d rather not walk outside and have a jay take me out because I stopped feeding them.

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      • by him inadvertently walking too close to the nest,he was a threat from the birds perspective.
        Anyone walking along the sidewalk would be attacked equally. Birds do not discriminate.
        That student was recorded by a survielance camera the University had.You can always tell the difference between one of those and someone recording on their cell phone.The surveillance camera will be steady but the cell phone will be very jerky.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        I felt sorry hearing about that man. I’m glad there are no trees near me – we lost all our trees to carpenter ants, back in the 90s. I didn’t realize that was a University camera – thanks for enlightening me on that as I just assumed it was a cellphone since it was not very clear. The schools all have them now – not when I was in school, plus they have the green lights for dialing 911 all around the schools – in fact, they have that around the City of Detroit in gas stations, high robbery areas. The cameras are tied in with the nearest police precinct.

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      • cameras do not stop the crime.It helps (not always) catch the bad guys. Your still going to be in the Hospital.

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      • lindasschaub says:

        Sometimes they have to rely on bystanders and they don’t always want to get involved.

        Like

  16. Pam Lazos says:

    The seasons are sparring here, too. Seventy degrees one day and down to 29 over night. But the wild news is, while at a training on Saturday where we sat outside because it was so nice, I saw a bald eagle fly overhead. It was so surreal because we were in the middle of Lancaster City. I took it as an omen of good fortune. xo

    Liked by 1 person

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