Friday Frivolity.

It is no secret that one of the great joys I reap from my walks at Council Point Park is interacting with my furry friends. Sure I enjoy going to the larger parks on the weekends, but they are often impersonal at times. There is no familiarity at those venues, like I find at my favorite nature nook where I know what trees will blossom first in the Spring, or which ones will turn awesome Autumn hues of golden-orangey-red. I know just where I might sneak up on a groundhog snacking on mulberries, or the angle where I might observe Harry the Heron before he freaks out, squawks and leaves in a huff. I know the exact location to peer between the trees to glimpse a long line of turtles sunbathing, or where the bunnies gather to indulge in sweet clover.

And … you can call me crazy, but when the squirrels come racing over to greet me I get a silly smile on my face. I am not the only one who feeds the squirrels. Arnie, a long-time walker at this venue, and I were chattin’ it up in the Park in the parking lot the other day. We both set out on the path together. This fact was not lost on the squirrels who, thanks to the cooler weather, are bright-eyed and bushy-tailed speed demons as they are now gathering peanuts in earnest. I remarked to Arnie that I could hear the squirrels’ brain gears clicking away with a thought bubble overhead that said: “Aah, two walkers bringing us peanuts – who should we go to first – we don’t want to offend either of them – never mind, we’ll converge on Arnie and Linda at the same time!” And so it was; we stopped in our tracks, simultaneously opened our Ziploc bags and watched a passel of squirrels come running to us, dancing around our ankles, clearly unsure where their loyalties should lie, yet not wanting to disappoint either of us by not rushing over.

If squirrels were trolls and peanuts were tolls

That morning’s undying devotion by the squirrels to their benefactors was not lost on a young bicyclist who has appeared on the perimeter path almost daily since the Park re-opened after the COVID-19 lockdown in May. This young man rides many round trips on the pathway and sometimes, as he zips past Arnie or me doling out peanuts to our eager furry friends, he will wag a finger at the squirrels and tell them to save some room for later when he comes back to feed them, just before he departs the Park. He always has a bag full of peanuts hanging from his bike.

Arnie usually only walks the one loop, so on my second go-around after Arnie left, I was bending down talking to a few skittish black squirrels, who eyed the peanuts in my bag, yet I still had to coax them over to me from where they cowered under a bush. They’d take two steps forward – one step back and I said “for goodness sake – do I look like some ogre who is going to hurt you?”

Unbeknownst to me, the bicyclist was within earshot … he startled me when he said “the way I see it, the squirrels are like the trolls under the bridge, and their toll for you to enter the Park is peanuts.” I laughed and quipped “one day they’re going to gang up on me! Look at them all around, just waiting to pounce if I am not quick enough handing out treats!”

He hopped off his bike, tossed down a pile of nuts and said “well, I’m paid up now, so I’m on my way.” I laughed and said “I’ve probably got a free pass the rest of my days at this Park!” Soon he was on his way, a smile on his face.

There is not a lot of things to smile about these days and, for a brief moment, the ugly images of 2020, a nation gone awry with its wildfires, hurricanes, Coronavirus, political and racial divisiveness, I reckoned that life sometimes was simple and good. Nature is always a calming balm in my opinion.

On this last weekend of Summer, I’ll leave you with this wise quote: “You don’t have to be in school to learn things. With nature, it’s always going to be there. It’s always going to be kind of like our support system. We just need to actually reach out and accept that we’re all connected and have a role to play. We’re all on this Earth together.” ~Nicole Jackson, Environmental Educator

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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72 Responses to Friday Frivolity.

  1. You were out spreading good cheer along with peanuts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes I was Anne … I tell my furry friends these offerings will make up for the icy and snowy days when I may not make it so they should find a place to hide the peanuts, preferably not where the snow will land later. We have a La Nina Winter on the way, so lots of precip – ugh!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s true, sometimes life this year has been simple and good. Often I feel guilty enjoying my bubble and my nature walks when so many others are suffering. It’s an ill wind that blows no good, as the saying goes. I love how you’ve made so many wonderful squirrel friends and the photos are so charming. Isn’t it a blessing to have seeing them every day to look forward to? I’m eagerly anticipating seeing more pictures of them as the seasons change. ♡

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I am like you Barbara and feel a little guilty that I’ve not had any concerns about work and decisions and worries that many have had. I have been working from home since 2011 so the lockdown/work from home was seamless for my boss/I. The walks are the highlight of my day and there are several people there who enjoy the walks like I do and love feeding the squirrels. The squirrels are friendly there (except the black squirrels who are skittish sometimes, especially by themselves – in a “crowd” of squirrels they are fine) and sometimes in the Winter, I’ll go to the Park when I’ve not been able to get there a few days in a row due to icy conditions and they almost bowl me over. I hope not to disappoint you – I generally get lots of photos of them in Fall and Winter.

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  3. I have squirrels in my yard every day. They eat the sunflower seeds under the bird feeders (yes, my feeders are truly squirrel proof). They are a hoot. Sometimes chasing each other and chittering away. They are entertaining for both me and my cats.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. ruthsoaper says:

    You always give your readers a reason the smile. 🙂 🙂 🙂 I’m not sure that it should be considered frivolity though.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you for saying that Ruth – I like to sprinkle a little whimsy in some of these posts and hoped to accomplish that today. I was just going to use the squirrel photos and the “trolls/tolls” line for a title and then changed it at the last minute.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ruthsoaper says:

        I just don’t want you to underestimate the value of your posts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I appreciate you saying that Ruth … I really have put a lot of time into my blogging efforts over the last few years … if you look at the beginning when I started in 2013, it was a one-line title, one-paragraph post and one picture, sometimes no pictures. I really am enjoying the whole aspect of blogging, especially since I started interacting with people in 2017 – the first 4 1/2 years I had only a few e-mail followers and only two ever commented. This is a whole new world for me … I know I don’t get too much done in the house like I should anymore due to blogging. Today I tried to spend some time doing housework since I wrote Monday’s post last night … but now I got here late and am even more behind in Reader. But I would not give up blogging … I really enjoy it. Thank you again for your nice comment Ruth.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Laurie says:

    Thank you for the wonderful smiles this morning, Linda. Loved the quote and the mental image of the squirrels ganging up on you and Arnie.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you enjoyed it Laurie. They are back to their antics and full of energy now that is cool outside again. Cool is an understatement – we are getting to 38 degrees tonight. Now that it is colder I am going to try this product (Fog Away) on my glasses that is supposed to keep them from fogging up with a mask and will let you know for Bill. You would like Arnie – he always has a story to tell me about what he sees if we are on opposite sides of the Park. We lamented the Park cutting down a beautiful Redbud tree – going to write a post about it in the near future.

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  6. Cute article and pics! 🙂
    They’ll need all of those nuts for the cold weather! It’s getting pretty darn cold already here at night, so i’m sure that it is where you are. I wish our squirrels loved leaves as much as they love acorns!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Tom, glad you liked it – it is funny that these furry little critters can bring a smile to so many people. It is best to enjoy them at a Park where you don’t have angst over damage in the garden, etc. or eating your car wires or telephone wires. We are going to 40 degrees tonight, but maybe 38 according to one meteorologist – that will tie a old record. It’s way too cold for this weather. Yes, they could carry away those leaves and give us less work to do come October. 🙂

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  7. You do realize the people you meet in the park are always so caring and genuinely nice. People that treat animals with love treat people the same way! I don’t blame you for walking the same places we are also creatures of habit just like your animal friends.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      This is very true Diane and even the people who do not feed the squirrels do get a kick out of watching them interacting with the people who do feed them. If I walk there on the weekends, I see more people feeding the the squirrels because I am usually there later – today for example, I will just stay local as I have lots to do at the house, but can stay there a little longer as it’s not a work day… the squirrels will still beg to those walkers, like they have not eaten in days. 🙂 It is only 39 degrees right now … have to find a warmer coat before I head out … maybe gloves as well.

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  8. Rebecca says:

    Those are some lucky squirrels to have so many who look out for them! Sweet photos and a fun story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, they are lucky and so many people, even though who don’t feed them, get a kick out of watching them darting around, begging for peanuts … I always laugh when they sit up and look around, like “what squirrel-loving sucker will feed me next?” Glad you liked the story Rebecca – this young man’s comments just made me day too.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. You’ve become a Jedi with your environment Linda! Being intimate with your “backyard” is critical to getting great shots! The only way your going to be able to figure this big mysterious puzzle out is to get out there and explore! Mostly leg work in the day but in the mind at night.
    Knowing where to go during windstorms,or at sunrise or sunset is important. It’s like you earn one piece of the puzzle each day until you realize after years of exploring that you now can see the bigger picture!
    I guess it’s a Zen thing?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I look forward to every day at the Park as it is a different experience, some more critter filled than others. This a peaceful way to start my day – my Zen, you are right. I hope there will continue to be more new people discovering nature and finding peace as well. It helps to counteract the few people who just walk, but don’t “get” the ambiance.

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      • and also the few people who are against wildlife!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You know I was tempted to bring that story up … I almost put it in there as a contrast, but decided to behave and just tell the trolls and tolls portion of the morning walk which was pretty funny. I am always talking to the squirrels and don’t pay any mind to anyone behind me and this time someone answered.

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      • When I’m in a river taking pictures of bears my head is moving around like a radar! I may be concentrating on a bear in front of me but will take a second to look around! I have a look around around every minute.
        When your concentrating on squirrels and not paying attention to whats behind you that makes you vulnerable. I may walk among the bears but you live in a very dangerous environment compared to me!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am always looking around too Wayne … it seems there is always something to see. Yesterday I saw two herons do a flyover … that’s a first at this Park to see two herons at one time. Yes, I was chattering away to them and the guy started speaking – it did startle me, but I think he thought I saw him in my peripheral vision which I did not. He is very nice; I never go there or anywhere too woodsy early in the morning. Too much is going on these days.

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      • the problem is when a animal in front of you is doing something captivating! I become consumed with getting shots but stop looking around as a result.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        And there are always other things to see. I watched a seagull drop right into a group of ducks. His wings were stretched out and I wanted to look at the photo tonight to see how it looked … he looked a bit like an angel, but there he was, plopping down in the ducks who looked miffed. I didn’t really see how the ducks looked til I saw it on the screen.

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      • when I mentioned needing to always look around it wasn’t so as to get “that shot”, It’s because of bears. I don’t one of them coming up from behind me. Actually no animal likes that. It’s the only real angle any animal has for being attacked by a predator!
        I’ve seen bears fine with me in my boat and they walking along the beach abreast of me,but when it would turn to go into the forest that meant it was turning it’s back on me! The bears would become very scared and bolt very quickly into the bush! It was thinking I could attack it from behind!
        So when I’m out shooting bears my head is always on a swivel.

        Once a bear did come up behind me. I didn’t notice it as I was shoting one in front of me. I turned around and saw a 2 year old female just waiting contently behind me not 10 feet. I knew she was already familiar with me from a distance. She was curious I guess? She had such a beautiful look to her face! I talked softly to her.I’ve never forget that moment!
        I called her “Teddy”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You are likely out in the boonies looking for bears more than I am out in a similar area, but I am sure your heart skipped a beat when you saw a bear behind you. I will tell you that when I finally got a chance to look at the pictures where I (so stupidly) got lost at the Crosswinds Marsh forest area, I realize what a bad move that was on my part. I was very far from the marshland area and I should not have wandered that far. If I’d have seen authorities, I would have suggested that they have as many trail markers and signs telling people what trails to get BACK to square one as they do exiting the marsh and onto the nature trails because not everyone has a smartphone on them to pull up a map of the area. My flip phone was not going to do me much good.

        I remember “Teddy” – you have mentioned her since I have followed you in January or February of 2018. I remember you said it was kind of magical how you both looked at one another, as if to be sizing each other up and a little skeptical of the other. You said you’d look for her whenever you are out looking for bears but you never saw her again or took photos for a post as far as I can recall.

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  10. Sartenada says:

    Hello Linda.

    How wonderful photos you offered us in this lovely post! Thank you.

    Happy weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Hi Matti – glad you enjoyed the photos of my squirrel friends … we have lots of squirrels here at my favorite nature nook and thankfully the now cooler weather has brought them out … a lot of the Summer they were lethargic and not too active on the path. Now they are gathering peanuts in earnest for Winter. We have very cool weather this morning – almost record-setting weather of 40 F (4.4 C) … I’ll need to pile on a few more layers before I head out today for my adventure. Have a good weekend.

      Like

  11. Sandra J says:

    That is such a good quote and so true. Nature continues no matter what, the animals do not worry about tomorrow. They live in the moment, spend their days foraging for food and if we pay attention to the animals around us, you will see them playing, interacting with each other. That is what it is all about.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I really liked that quote too Sandra – I am not surprised you liked it. I saw it on a nature site awhile ago and tucked it away. I had a great morning at the Park this morning – it was 39 when I left the house … we almost tied the old record of 38 and I had on a heavy coat and broke out the gloves, but I walked there so the sun warmed me up. The squirrels are quite animated from the cooler temps and were playing hide-and-seek so got some shots of that and some funny shots of them near a park bench. I put peanuts on the park bench which is a metal mesh material and they accessing them from underneath instead of climbing up. It was funnier than it sounds here but there were two of them and they were funny to watch. The fox squirrel had been sitting on top of the bench and some runners went by so he got scared. The series of photos will likely explain it better.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra J says:

        Cooler weather does that for the animals, they start playing again. Even my cat, she does not do much when it is hot. But now she is running all over the house, sneaking up on the dogs and swatting them. Fun to watch.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It is good to see them perkier, just like your cat. Just like us as well – even if we go out very early in the morning, on hot/humid days, it could still be oppressive out.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Love the quote you used to end your post and your eloquent words: “Nature is always a calming balm in my opinion.”
    It’s wonderful that your familiarity with Council Point Park leads you to the different animals’ habitats!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Esther … I had tucked that quote away when I saw it earlier this year and I decided it was perfect for this post. I do find nature to be a balm, especially in this age of COVID, and everything else bad that is going on in the world. We need to find goodness somewhere – nature is the answer. I do like this park because it is smaller and I feel like I know every foot of the perimeter path and what to expect along the way.

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      • I enjoy smaller parks too and familiar paths; Peaceful and comfortable. But I haven’t found a local park that I am especially drawn to. They’re either too large or too many people.
        How cool that it’s nearby to you and you enjoy it!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        They are nicer, better ambiance Esther … I enjoy the larger parks on the weekends, but they do not have the same feel as this Park which I try to visit all four seasons and this is my seventh year walking here … I cannot believe that this park was established in 1994 and I didn’t find out about it until 2013 and it is only one mile away – SMH!

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      • What a long time that you did not know about the park’s opening! Sometimes good things are closer than we think, just need more digging to find them out. This pandemic has taught me that I don’t need to go far for adventures.
        Small parks are intimate and feel safer. Parker, his buddies, and the lone groundhog are very grateful for you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I do like this smaller park, as I feel like I’ve seen or walked it so many times, that I know what to expect and seeing those furry friends like Parker is a treat (probably more so for him as he gets food out of the “deal”). Yes, you do feel safer and I finished a long post about a trek in the Summer where I got lost in the woods, far from the marsh area. I am always much more careful and I found myself walking and walking and couldn’t find my way back. That was an unusual circumstance but it reminded me just how special this little Park is – same amenities, and peace and tranquility but more manageable.

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      • Oh my gosh, I gotta read that post of you lost in that marsh area. That must’ve been frightening. Some vast places make it easy to lose track of your trail and more so if you’re unfamiliar with it.
        Getting lost in the woods or wilderness is for the risk takers, the adrenaline seeking folks! Reminds me of the guy who did push ups on top of the mountain.
        We’ll stick to the quiet and serene places.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You’re in luck – that post was published today, but be forewarned – it is a long read and picture laden. I was not happy with myself for doing that and I may have seen people a few times to ask directions, but in between I was along and in a forested area (at times, sometimes it was a dirt/gravel trail). When I saw the photos I took (not all used) I was even madder at myself. It was partly their fault because they had lousy directions to return to the marsh starting point – lots of directions to leave, nothing to return.

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      • I read your post about the marsh yesterday. I wanted to comment on it, but didn’t get around to it.
        The pictures were lovely and I like how you take pictures of each juncture that you talk about. Sorry that you walked the whole 8 miles…whew, that was not a short leisurely walk.
        I wonder if other people have had a similar experience like you. That can be maddening. I would not have liked that at all and probably would’ve had body aches afterwards.
        Maybe you could alert them to this issue, if you have time. I’m sure not everyone would appreciate the maze experience.
        Glad you found your way out before dark and got so many miles in your walk!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was tempted to look for someone when I got back, and thought about complaining the whole time I was gone – lack of signs to get back to the marsh. The woman in charge of the marsh has hardly posted on Facebook this year. She always posted daily about what she saw and I learned a lot from her as she posted pictures or videos and a small narrative. I can’t imagine that is a job you can do remotely? I’m glad you liked the photos Esther – there was a lot to see but if I returned here, I’d go in the Fall and after COVID is over as the wooden overlooks were not all that wide – I would just go onto the overlooks and stay close to the marsh this time.

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      • COVID has changed so much about the hours of operation and people working at different places.
        I hope you were wearing sunscreen that day. It seemed so bright and hot! Reading through your post, I kept wondering if you had enough water with you. That’s something always on my mind…my kids want water at most inopportune times and if I don’t have their water bottles with me, it stresses me out, especially when it is for Ellis. I love my little girl, but her high maintenance gives me grey hairs.
        Yep, stay close to the marsh! You’ve done the whole adventurous exploration of that place already.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        No, I did not carry water as I was carrying the camera, bag and wearing a fanny pack, and, thankfully I was going to take binoculars to see the “promised critters and birds” and sure am glad I left them behind. No more treks into the wild for me. I generally don’t carry water, just because I don’t want to get anything wet nor carry too much stuff. Nor do I apply bug repellent or sunscreen as I don’t want greasy stuff on my hands while using the camera. I wear a long sleeved shirt and long pants instead … not a day for that combo, believe me!

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      • What an adventure! I’m so glad you did not freak out on the trail; that would’ve made it worse. You are a trooper.
        Stay safe while exploring. It’s crazy how easily one can get hurt on fun outings. Remember my head injury at the beach…man, I learned my lesson!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thanks Esther – I will be careful going forward and it’s funny … at Heritage Park they have a short trail through the woods and I never go there and it’s be impossible to get lost, but don’t want to go in a deep forest, no matter how small. So I threw caution to the wind evidently. Sigh. You sure did learn your lesson hitting your head on those slick rocks.

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      • It depends on who said that it’s impossible to get lost. It could’ve been an adventure seeker who thinks getting lost in the woods is a thrill.
        I’m all for staying on the safe side! If you do want to explore, maybe you could go with a friend.
        After the rock incident, I have been mindful of my steps and types of surfaces to walk on. Didn’t realize till then that falling could kill you. Must take care…

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      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, be careful with the rocks … I told you about my friend who dog was excited to see her nephew’s new puppy and pushed ahead of Ilene and knocked her over and her head hit the cement. She had lots of issues and had a brain bleed – still has some bleeding issues per her CT scan she has every 3-4 months, but under control since the surgery. And the nephew who was visiting her felt horrible, but now, just a few months ago, he slipped in the shower and hit his head, had a concussion and now suffers from terrible headaches. That slip-and-fall was in early August and the doctor has him off work until the beginning of 2021!

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      • What a horrible accident and the long term issues stemming from it! And now her nephew had a fall in the shower?! That’s awful. My goodness, I can imagine how scared your friends must’ve been in both situations. I hope they recover soon and fully from their headaches and will stay safe!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, Ilene still has the bleeding two years later and 18 months after surgery. Don’t know what’s going to happen with her nephew. He is a security guard, married – wife has a job. Luckily they don’t have kids right now, so just the two of them and it is Canada so a lot of healthcare is covered. My boss’ friend (mine too … nice older man) fell down the steps on August 16th and broke several vertebrae in his neck … he has a feeding tube since he had polio as a child and that has complicated his healing, so he has to have a feeding tube as he recovers (hopefully not permanently). He is in a brace – they let him out of the hospital one week after the accident and only three days after he left the ICU. Crazy these days – they don’t keep you in any longer than they have to.

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      • It’s a relief your friend’s nephew has good healthcare! That’s a blessing in the midst of all he and his wife have to go through.
        I hope your friend will fully recover and will get the most nutrition out of the feeding tube. Is it a nasal gastric one? That can be cumbersome with the tube going up the nose and down the throat. Lots of hurting people these days; inside homes are different life stories being played out, like these 2 friends you mentioned.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I am not sure how his feeding tube is, but I am guessing a nasal one and down the throat, as I was monitoring my boss’ e-mail and voicemail while he was on vacation and this friend left several message and he did not sound like himself at all. Maybe he had a mask on as well so difficult to understand him, but his voice was quite raspy.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Whenever I encounter squirrels they remind me of you, Linda! Having stayed close to home as well has helped me tune into nature much more closely as well. Parker and his friends are lucky to have you and all the other kind walkers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It is good to see you back here Sabine … I know you have been following all along so you know my interactions have continued throughout this horrible year and the squirrels really do make my day at the Park. I am glad the weather is cooler as they were lethargic and inactive and I feel badly that after the lockdown at the Park was over, I’ve never seen a single cardinal. I had just written about them following me around and then the Park closed down for that month; now they are gone. I am glad I am not the only one feeding them because I won’t worry so much in the Winter and I can’t down there due to ice and snow concerns.

      Liked by 1 person

      • There haven’t been as many birds around here either. I know the last couple of weeks with all the awful smoke I didn’t see any in the yard. Knowing that there are other animal lovers helping out at your park must feel good, especially with your harsh winters!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I do hope all the birds are not injured by the wildfire smoke. Birds’ respiratory systems are so delicate. I was worried for that one-month period of time that our Park shut down for the lockdown they may find food scarce. The berries and nuts would not be ripe . I guess it is better it happened then, rather than Fall or Winter when the squirrels and birds have fewer foraging opportunities. I do feel better knowing a few people are feeding the squirrels Sabine. The Park “crowd” is about 10% former walkers and the rest are all new and bicyclists, lots of runners. I assume some have started working out there as our gyms were closed from mid-March until about two weeks ago. Also, people may have lost jobs or might be working from home now, so have more time to visit the Park.

        I do miss the cardinals – I don’t know where they have gone, but the jays are still there. We are supposed to get more wildfire smoke in the next day or so. It had stopped and we had bright blue skies the last three days.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I did see that our smoke drifted all the way across the country. I would be surprised if this didn’t affect wildlife. We’re supposed to get our first autumn storm tonight! Lots of rain and heavy winds are forecast. I hope the fires will get doused. The park I’ve been going to during the pandemic is mostly quiet. Few people but that’s fine with me. No cardinals though! I hope they’ll return to your park soon!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        After four days of bright blue skies and sunshine, we once again had a light haze that the meteorologist says was caused by the wildfires – nothing like last week though. I hope this storm is enough to stop the fires altogether. Do they have rehab centers where injured wildlife are going? A quiet park is fine with me too. Throughout the pandemic, especially in the Summer, mostly on weekends, the thirteen Metroparks counted how many cars entered the park and after their quota of half capacity, they closed the park down until more people left. I do look for the cardinals daily – no luck so far which is too bad.

        Liked by 1 person

      • We’re in for a few days of rain now and I welcome it. I don’t know about wildlife rehab centers here in Oregon. I know there are quite a number of them in California. I’m sure that the Audubon Society has some for birds. The cardinals will be back. I’m certain.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        That’s good and I am sure that will give a much-deserved rest for the firemen as well. What a tragic loss to all concerned – loss of lives, homes and to nature too. I hope the birds do not suffer too much from the smoke. Smoke is very bad for any bird. My friend lost her Amazon Grey parrot she had had for 25 years when her husband was baking bread and the ceramic pan slid off the oven rack and caught on fire. They could not move their pet out of the kitchen quickly enough and it was in December so going outside would not have been an option and he died within a few minutes.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Prior... says:

    nice pots and the second half of that quote was a top takeaway

    “We just need to actually reach out and accept that we’re all connected and have a role to play. We’re all on this Earth together.” ~Nicole Jackson

    Keep sharing all this natural love with us Linda
    🙂 so good

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I love those brief but cheerful encounters we have with people as we go about our days (of course they happened more frequently pre-Covid). I love the cyclist’s comparison of feeding peanuts to the squirrels to trolls and tolls (although the squirrels are way cuter than trolls).

    Enjoy your last day of summer (although I guess that’s rather subjective since it’s still very summerish here… and will be for a while).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, I love those encounters too Janis plus impromptu chats with others that you don’t know, just that have that love of nature or walking. This young man is very nice and seemed amused by the interaction on the pathway every morning, only to decide to start interacting with and feeding the squirrels himself and offering that quip which I knew had to be blog post.

      We’ve had a taste of Fall the last week – we tied a record of 38 degrees on Saturday morning and it was very chilly yesterday and today. Now we get a brief warm-up. The weather has been very wacky here in SE Michigan.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. J P says:

    Everyday interactions with others should happen more often even in normal times.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. bekitschig says:

    Oh I would’ve loved that scurry of squirrels (hopefully, I got that right) and, again, I lve your ending! It is indeed hard to find positive things at the moment and this just sounds like a perfect break!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes, you are right Jeanine – it is a scurry of squirrels. And yes, they will come at you and be dancing around your feet if you feed them regularly. (Sometimes even if you don’t feed them regularly, they will still beg with others.) That we were both on the trail at the same time made them wonder how to handle that situation and get peanuts from both of us. The young guy was funny as he always rides first, stops to feed them later, often after we’re gone, or if I walk there on a weekend I see him.

      Right now we need more laughs and getting away in a natural setting like that is like stepping away from the real world and into a calmer and tranquil setting for a short time. I’ll savor each day, especially as we near Winter. (Ugh!)

      Liked by 1 person

      • bekitschig says:

        You really hit a note there with me. I am not sure how this is all gonna go come winter … Although, school is still going here without any cases yet, so let’s not hope for the worst!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        We have schools starting with in-seat learning, only to go to virtual within a week or so due to COVID cases and that ranges from elementary schools to colleges/universities. Today in our state, there will be an unmasked rally at the Capitol building to allow school-age athletes to go maskless at games citing a hardship to wear a mask during strenuous activities. I don’t think sports activities should have begun at any level than professional, where athletes can live in a bubble, live together in hotels while on the road … I just don’t know, but I don’t have any kids, let alone kids attending school or involved in sports-related activities, so I am probably not sympathetic enough to their plight. I hope your schools can continue in-seat learning without issue.

        Like

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