The moon and stars were aligned …

… because this visit to Lake Erie Metropark on the Saturday of Memorial Weekend was one of my best ever in the four years I’ve been going there. My all-time favorite was the near nose-to-nose encounter with a fawn whose mom disappeared for a snack and a swim and left me to babysit Bambi. Oh, what a hardship that was! About 50 camera clicks later, Mom emerged from the bushes to collect her offspring and Bambi trotted off, politely and perhaps even wistfully, looking back at me. My heart melted and I think I floated home. As fellow blogger and wildlife photographer Wayne of Tofino Photography is fond of saying “it’s all a matter of being at the right place and right time.”

Last Monday was part one of that Saturday morning stroll, mostly meandering along the Cove Point Lake Erie shoreline which encompasses three miles.  The highlight of that portion of my day was the blitzing Barn Swallows.  You can read about it here if you missed it.

After heading to the car, I rested up a few minutes, then drove over to the other side of the 1,607-acre (6.50 km) park to garner more steps and see if my photo luck might continue.

The landscape is quite different there, with more marshes and lagoons and a few rustic trails.  I always park by the Marshlands Museum and stop to visit Luc, an 18-year old Bald Eagle.  Since 2009, Luc has lived in an “aeire” or outdoor enclosure.  Due to an accident, Luc cannot be released into the wild; he is blind in one eye and one wing is permanently damaged.  I always call out a cheery “hello Luc” as I approach the cage, mindful not to look at the enclosure’s bottom where Luc’s breakfast is usually slung across a low tree stump.  While a dead white rabbit or white rat may appeal to an eagle, I’d just as soon not see it.  I make eye contact with Luc only and my eyes never stray beneath the middle horizontal bar of his enclosure.

Sometimes Luc will return my greeting with a good morning chirp. Perhaps with his one bad eye he mistakes me for the person delivering room service? Sometimes he just stares at me or turns his back … that’s okay too.

I left Luc and was grateful for the pea gravel strewn across the muddy entrance to the overlook – at least my shoes were not going to get muddy. I walked to the edge of the wooden platform that juts out over the marsh. A pair of Great Egrets multi-tasked, as they waded and simultaneously studied the water for their breakfast.

I hoped their eyesight was better than mine because across the marsh from where I stood, the water was green and murky looking.

Yep, green gook was everywhere.

Here’s a good example of that green gook, which glommed together near the overlook.  My overactive imagination told me this looked like the footprint of a Heron or Egret embedded in the muck and mire, but more likely it was a stick floating on the surface.

A Mallard drake was preening that green gook off its feathers, a rather futile exercise and a Mama Mallard, her seven ducklings in tow, was trying to find a clear space to navigate.

I watched the ducklings’ tiny bodies alternately bobbing  and dabbling for seaweed.

It was otherwise boring – no big bullfrogs belching under cover of the green gook, so it was time to move along.  I stepped off the overlook.  Once again my thick-soled walking shoes crunched as I picked my way across the pea gravel, but suddenly a squeaky noise made me turn around.  I knew it wasn’t Luc.  What in the world?  It turned out to be a groundhog, which I’m grateful didn’t scurry past me when I was near the edge of the overlook as I might have tumbled over the railing and into the water.

Yes, the gravel-crunching noise likely startled this fellow who shot me an indignant look, but my heart was thumping too! 

That grumpy groundhog hightailed it off the overlook as it vamoosed.

I stopped and told Luc all about it.  He seemed disinterested, merely swiveling his head around with a pained look as if to say “if you really want to get on my good side Linda, see what happened to my morning RATions.”

Heading to the boat launch area.

There is a long road leading to the boat launch area where swooping seagulls often fill that little harbor’s skies. You can start the Cherry Island Trail from there as well. There is the option to walk on the road or walk along the very long wooden overlook that runs parallel to the road.

Along the way, I got a close-up of one of the Egrets I was watching earlier.

Across the lagoon is the view of the overlook and boathouse. I strained my eyes to see if I could see my groundhog buddy, but he was long gone.

A flash of white in the distance caught my attention. A pair of Mute Swans and their cygnets. How exciting, even if they were far away across the lagoon! I hung out for about a half hour hoping they were divas and would appreciate the paparazzi, but they stayed put. Here are the closest shots I got and I will cross off that wish from my Birdie Bucket List!

Reluctantly I left the Mute Swan family as I’d reached the boat launch and the beginning of the Cherry Island Trail.

Navigating the Cherry Island Trail.

Visits to this park don’t often include this trail unless I time it just right and there’s been no heavy rains for a while. To the left is Lake Erie and to the right are a wooded area and bogs – lots of bogs. So, just in case I can walk this route, I always ensure I’m wearing long pants and long sleeves to thwart mosquitoes. Here are some shots taken along the 1.25 mile (2.00 km) Cherry Island Trail and, as you see from the signage …

… this sometimes-rustic trail goes along the waterfront …

… or near a lagoon …

… maybe along a grassy path …

… or becomes an overlook …

… then dumps out onto a rustic trail again. (I was right behind this Robin.)

The Cherry Island Trail meanders through the marsh, filled with cattails and a few small Water Lotus beds that will be spectacular by late Summer. Nothing much to see now. Mr. and Mrs. Mallard didn’t look too enthused to see me (or each other for that matter).

Poplar fuzz was floating around and landing everywhere I walked.

On the last leg of the Cherry Island Trail, I saw some movement in the bushes.

A doe fixated her gaze on me – should she trust me or stay under cover in the forested area? She stayed put, but seemed fascinated with me. I’ll save those photos for Wednesday as this is already a picture-laden post.

Clearly I need a self-driving car or a driver.

Enroute to Lake Erie Metropark, many hours before, as I was driving along West Jefferson Avenue, a parade of Mallard munchkins followed their Mom across the usually busy street. I’m glad there were no vehicles coming from the opposite direction. I gladly stopped while the group waddled across the street. While I was driving out of the park to go home, I saw a version of a Bambi and Thumper Kodak moment. Of course I was driving again and the park discourages stopping along the road. A family of geese and their goslings were grazing. The parents were close by as the goslings nibbled grass and a doe crossed the road, head bent down, clearly with the intention of visiting, not harming, the goslings. The gander went ballistic and amid the hissing and wing-flapping that ensued, the poor doe was scared and loped off. What a fun encounter to photograph, yet I drove on, but never saw another vehicle as I exited the park, so I could have stopped and pretended I didn’t see the signs.

About Linda Schaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, so this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for four decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, though I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too. - Linda Schaub
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68 Responses to The moon and stars were aligned …

  1. Great pictures! You can’t beat babies for a good shot.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Kate – I have been trying to get Mute Swan baby pics for years. I still want to see them riding on their mom’s back, nestled between the feathers, so I’ll keep on trying. And those ducklings – always so sweet.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Anne says:

    This was an exciting outing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Yes Anne – sometimes in the past I have gone and seen a few seagulls and that is it. It was really nice … I’ve been three times so far this Summer and each time I’ve come home with photos of birds I’ve been looking to find for years.

      Like

  3. You visited all sorts of critters Linda! I’m always sad about Luc. Such a majestic creature being forced to live such a lonely life! If he had another eagle to interact with I’m sure he would be happier!
    I think I would of stopped and taken shots of the deer.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I did Wayne – it was a great outing! I wish I could have seen the Mute Swan family up close, but I was happy to see them across the marsh. I still hope to see a Mama Swan taking her cygnets for a ride on her back feathers … someday, hopefully down at the Detroit River at Dingell Park. It isn’t for lack of trying as I was going once a week from mid-May to mid-June.

      Yes, Luc is so quiet – no stimulation for him. His cage and the nearby overlook are near the museum, but not next to it, down a hill and off to the side. So it is not like people are going past him constantly. I was at another metropark over 4th of July and they have a nature center and two separate enclosures for other raptors who are not releasable. I took pics of Radar, a Great Horned Owl who was injured by a car while hunting for food and Hawkeye, a Red-Tailed Hawk who was kept in a cage and his flight feathers did not grow properly. They are in side-by-side enclosures, so they cannot see one another.

      I should have pulled over as no one ended up being behind me, but I didn’t know that would happen.

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  4. You had lots of winners here. The word I liked best was RATions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thanks Anne – it was a fun day, from start to finish with lots to see. Glad you liked that … I was having some fun with Luc’s food. I made the mistake of looking down a few times during a visit … never again. He doesn’t get fed every day either, so I imagine he is starving by the time his RATions arrive.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Laurie says:

    You DO need to invest in a self-driving car. All of those photographs you missed! The Bambi/Thumper one would have made a blog post all by itself. Late spring is the perfect time to see a variety of nature. The cygnets are so cute! How could anyone mistake one for an ugly duckling?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I was bummed to miss those shots Laurie, especially the second one. That doe was so sweet and only wanted to play with the goslings. She was so timid, approaching slowly, with her nose near the ground as if sniffing them out as she got closer. They weren’t afraid, but boy did Dad spring into action. I definitely need a self-driving car or a driver. 🙂 I remember that tale too – a swan is much too beautiful to ever have that moniker.

      Like

  6. Rebecca says:

    I always enjoy seeing the Mother swans and ducks with their babies. You’ve got some wonderful nature photos here. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I’ve been trying for years to get a close-up of the Mom with her babies on her back. I went down to the Detroit River weekly as there are a lot of swans there, but didn’t even see swans, let alone swans with babies. This was a treat to find, even across the marsh. Thank you Rebecca – it was a great day, from start to finish.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. The planets definitely aligned for you to get so many fab photo ops of the wildlife, but especially the baby ducks and swans, Linda! So adorable! And Luc the eagle seems content…wow, 18 years old! How cool you get to see and interact with him a little on your visits. It does seem like he needs the company.

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    • Linda Schaub says:

      t was a great day Terri and earlier in the day, in the separate post, I had the barn swallows perch by me at the lagoon (that never happens as they are darting everywhere), tree swallows on nest boxes, a heron and a Monarch Butterfly, the only one I’ve seen this year. I’ve been looking for the Mute Swan cygnets for years. I always stop to see Luc and interact with him. He is usually quiet and yes, like Wayne always says when I include Luc in a post, he needs company. That is not a high-traffic area so he is by himself most of the time. I’m sure he dreams about when he was free to fly anywhere before his injuries.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Eilene Lyon says:

    You have such a delightful way of describing your wildlife encounters and conversations. How lucky to get those swan photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Eilene. I really wish I could have photographed that sweet doe and the goslings, which would have been like children playing, except Dad got an attitude.

      This was a great day from start to finish. I’ve been trying to see Mute Swan cygnets every Spring, even going down to the Detroit River on a weekly basis as there are a lot of Mute Swans, just to see the cygnets riding on their mom’s back. So unfortunately they were across the marsh, but still exciting.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Prior... says:

    Had to smile when you said you need a driver or self driving car!
    And one again enjoyed so much of the nature in your area !

    Liked by 1 person

  10. AnnMarie R stevens says:

    Miss Linda………………………………..thank you for the story and pictures of your adventure to my favorite park too………………………………….you’re a very good story teller!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Ann Marie – I am glad you enjoyed the pictures and the story too! I know this is one of your favorite parks. I will have another two-part post at this venue in a month or so, a part of the park I’ve never been to before.

      Like

  11. Joni says:

    What a delightful day you had Linda! Love the baby swans, but the water looks so dirty and marshy – but I guess it is a marsh. Were there a lot of mosquitoes there or do they spray? I’ve never seen a groundhog, or a doe either – so looking forward to your WW.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was great Joni – I hated to go home, but by then it was getting warm and I’d been walking around for hours. I was so excited to see the swans – the baby swans were on my “Birdie Bucket List” for several years now and I’d been going down to the River once a week looking for them. There were not too many mosquitoes in the marshy area as it had not rained in a few days and I was later getting to that side of the park – glad I did that because in the wooded area with the bogs, it does get mosquito-y in the morning. I always wear long pants and when I was in the car I put on my coat because I wanted my arms covered … good thing I did as the early morning sun gave me a sunburn. I was excited about the doe … she was in the trees, peeking between the branches. I got as close as I could without spooking her. She was pregnant, though you can’t really tell in the photos. I went back two weeks later hoping to see a fawn, hers or another doe’s. I didn’t see a fawn the next time, but saw several does running across the road in front of me.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for the introduction to Luc. It must be tough on him not being able to see well or fly but I’m glad he was found and is well cared for, even getting his preferred food delivered. That green muck looks awful! How exciting to encounter a groundhog!!! And your picture of it is amazing! Loved seeing the swan family with their little cygnets. Once in a great while I’ll see a solitary swan but it’s been many years since I’ve seen a family of them. The boardwalk on Cherry Island Nature Trail looks so inviting and your portrait of the mallard couple is quite lovely. I know how frustrating it is to be driving along and to see something great to photograph, with no place to pull over or it isn’t allowed. Sigh… But hopefully your memories of the scene will stay with you. 🌞

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Glad you liked this walk Barbara – I know it is a walk you and Tim would enjoy taking. I don’t always get to the Cherry Island Trail, so I was happy to get some photos from there for a change of pace. The mallard pair must have had a spat. They made me smile seeing them like that. I feel badly for Luc as it is isolated there and not really close enough to the museum that people would pop over to visit him as he is down the hill. That groundhog was a real surprise – first time I saw one there and we kind of stared at one another – he made the first move and jumped off the outlook.

      I’ve been looking for several years to find a swan with cygnets and I finally lucked out. It was not that I didn’t try as I was going down to the River where there are more swans to see if there were any families down there – no luck on any of my weekly trips. I still hope to see mom carrying her cygnets on her back feathers.

      I do hate missing shots like that, but both times it was not convenient to stop. The first time I wouldn’t know if someone was paying attention behind me and would rear-end the car if I stopped too long and the second time pulling over meant risking a hand-slapping for doing so with all the signs around.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. peggy says:

    You seem to have the greatest places to walk. You found some interesting wildlife to photograph. So happy you got to babysit Bambi – what an experience. Enjoyed your post very much. That definitely was a grumpy looking ground hog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      This is one of my favorite parks Peggy … I come home with a few photos, but this time there was so much to see and I’ve been back twice since that day and come home with more pics of new critters. The day with Bambi was my best nature experience ever. That fawn and doe were so trusting and the fawn stayed there, with no intention to leave until mom came looking for it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        A nature memory that will stay with you forever. A wonderful time with Bambi. 😊❤️

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, it did Peggy and now I was hoping to find a fawn with the doe in today’s post. The way she watched me for so long, I wondered if she was the doe who left Bambi with me last year – maybe she was just wary and being cautious.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Wild creatures are skiddish when it comes to dealing with humans. I can understand their fear.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Me too Peggy – it takes just one encounter with a human that might try to harm them and it sours them on humans forever. Like you, I try to be respectful of critters, even the squirrels, (as they don’t all know me), by not creeping up behind them or startling them. Even the rattling of the cellophane peanut bag often triggers a young squirrel, not yet familiar with me, to scamper off and up a tree. I was close enough to touch that Red-Bellied Woodpecker this morning after putting down peanuts and he swooped down near my feet. I never take out the camera until I’m done putting down their treats as I try to discourage them coming over on the path because of the hawks. I heard a hawk this morning and it flew to a tall tree to scope out the area, no doubt looking for my furry friends.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        You are so kind to the little creatures of this world. I often stand still in the yard and watch to see how close to me the little creatures will come. What fun to have them come very close to me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        It is a good feeling isn’t it Peggy. A fellow blogger Wayne, who lives in British Columbia, photographs eagles and bears mostly. He posts pics of how the eagles fly over to see him while he is out in his boat. He had a bear photo the other day where you could see how close Wayne was to the bear from his shadow. He had stepped out of the boat to get close-ups and was on land for a change, so he had the shadow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Wow – what an interesting story about Wayne. I do not believe I would be brave enought to get very close to a bear. When we lived in Batesville, Arkansas a big flock of turkey came in our back yard everyday. We were careful not to scare them. But my son-in-law was visiting one day and he ran out and scared the turkey – we never saw them again He was young and stupid, but 20 years later I am still upset that he did this. Some people do not deal with nature correctly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I would be upset too Peggy. Even a sudden move can spook critters. I always approach any critter taking baby steps and talking softly – if someone sweet-talked me like I do to them, I’d hang around too. 🙂 This morning I drove out to Lake Erie Metropark, the third time back hoping to see that doe in the picture with a fawn or two. I didn’t see her, but I saw something nice. This park has two of the largest American Water Lotus beds in the State. They are two and five acres big. They usually are in full bloom by late August, but I took a chance and went there today as it’s been so hot – about 1/3 of them are in bloom. We are having a very hot week next week and some heavy rain storms, so I thought better to go early, than they are ruined. So, a doe stepped from the marsh bank into the water and started munching on the Water Lotuses. I took a lot of photos, stayed about 1/2 hour thinking she may come closer or have a fawn with her, but here she was standing in the marsh eating lotuses. The Lotuses are protected and if you steal a bloom or a leaf you will be fined. At the end of the year when the petals die and the seed pods form, it is the same – you steal the pods, you get a fine. I guess the doe did not understand the penalty.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Wow – I wish we had some parks closer to our house. Everything here is at least 30 miles away and then 30 miles back. That is something – that deer stealing those seed pods and not getting caught and fined. Ha Ha Thanks for the laugh – I needed a good laugh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I was at a couple more big parks today and it was hot by mid-day, but not humid, so that made a lot of difference. I was still warm though as I wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt and it was near 80 by the time I drove home. I was going to go to Sterling State Park yesterday – that is 30 miles each way. Every time I plan to go there, something happens (construction usually, once an underground gas vapor leak, another time a bad accident); yesterday they closed the beach area due to e-coli and high algae bloom. I’ll try this Fall. That deer was so funny, munching away, standing in the marsh. Glad to give you a laugh Peggy.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Hope you make it to Sterling State Park someday. This world is so unsafe to travel far from home anymore. The covid cases in this state are high right now. About 8 people at church have covid – including the preacher and his wife.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I hope so too Peggy. I was starting to think I shouldn’t go and it was an omen of some type. I don’t like driving on the expressway and just as soon take surface streets and that’s for reasons like this: today, in another county, three different drivers were nabbed by the State Police going over 120 mph on the expressway. Two were stopped, ticketed and drove off at the same speed and stopped again. A friend of mine who lived in Florida was rear-ended by a texting dump truck driver. My friend had such severe injuries he died two days later. Maybe it was a blessing – he had broken his back, broken his neck in three places and had severe internal injuries and had no family. Covid still worries me very much – they are now advising wearing a mask in public places, including my county. I still wear a mask whenever I go out, even to the park. That’s a lot of people at your church plus the preacher/wife – terrible and very worrisome.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        We do not drive on the freeway – we use the back roads. Those drivers out there are a wild bunch.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Yes, I don’t care to drive to drive around the busy streets to be honest. Some people it does not affect them in the least, but it does me – back roads work for me if I can take them over some of the highways (and definitely no expressways).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        I got Wayne’s recent post to send to you Peggy. I will send it in a separate comment in case it goes to SPAM. Sometimes I have five SPAM items in my folder – today I have 55 which makes no sense to m.

        Liked by 1 person

      • peggy says:

        Thanks for that link to Wayne’s post. I checked out his post on Eagles too. Did not hesitate to follow his blog.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        You’re welcome Peggy. Wayne has some awesome photo shoots. I was amazed he was so close as he usually only takes bear pics while in his boat. Andy and Wayne follow one another as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Too close for comfort here and a new bear he’d never met before but he was okay with it:
        https://tofinophotography.wordpress.com/2022/07/25/my-shadow-and-my-furry-friend/

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Aww…you did it, you got to see and capture photos of the Mute Swans and their cygnets!!! What a wonderful walk and so full of fun sights to see. Thank you for sharing with us! Maybe someday you’ll get a Uber or Lift and make sure they’ll pause so you can take photos? Otherwise, you do a great job of telling us with words what you saw. I always feel as though I’m right there walking with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you Shelley – glad you feel like you are walking there with me. This was a really great day as it seemed at every corner there was something else to see that day. I’ve been back to this park two more times and have seen some more new critters (for me anyway) and I was hoping to see another fawn. This doe in the woods was pregnant, so I was hoping to see another Bambi – not so far though. Yes, an Uber would be perfect – I would stay “stop” and I’d hop out or take pictures from the vehicle. Th first time I went to Grosse Ile, an island about 12 miles from me, I went looking for deer as a walker at Council Point Park, walked daily with a friend, but he/wife walked on the island and he showed me all kinds of deer on his phone. “They are everywhere!” he said. So I set out, found a place to park – difficult to do so as no public parking. Went to two little forested areas – nothing. Got into the car and driving down the road and a couple of bucks were crossing in front of me and ran into the forest again. Gulp – missed shot as it is the main street/perimeter road around the island.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Dave says:

    Quite the animal sanctuary you describe, Linda, and it seems you had most of it to yourself on this day. I’m glad the birds and other animals seemed comfortable in your presence. Looking forward to reading about your unexpected encounter with Bambi!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a great day Dave and you are right, I had most of the park to myself, likely since it was the first day of a long holiday, people were on the road or on the way to their destination, so really the most people I saw were a few fisherman at the designated fishing spots, not near me. My Bambi encounter was great – I was mesmerized. My doe tomorrow – she was skittish and hid behind a tree or branches, but seemed fascinated with me taking pictures of her. She was pregnant, though you can’t tell in the photos and I’ve been back twice since hoping to see a fawn, but no luck.

      Like

  16. Nancy Ruegg says:

    Wow–that was a stellar day of animal encounters! I can only imagine the delight of babysitting a fawn. AND, I had no idea that deer swam! Love those photos of the swan parents with their cygnets, too. Maybe when those babies grow a little bigger, Mom and Dad won’t be quite so protective!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a stellar day of animal encounters Nancy – it seemed each time I turned a corner, there was something else new for me to see and take photos of. I was so excited with that fawn last year – it was beautiful, just the fawn and me after mom took off. Yes, deer swim and I never knew that until I went to Dingell Park and across from there is an uninhabited island. It’s not very big but fisherman are down at the boardwalk and would tell stories of deer swimming across to shore, just their heads and a rack of antlers above the water. I was amazed at that and thought they were just saying that, then at this park I have seen them a few times in the marsh. They jump into the water and swim pretty quickly, maybe to cool off as well. I just Googled how fast they swim – 13 to 15 miles per hour!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Nancy Ruegg says:

        Thank you for the detailed description. I can readily imagine the scene!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you Nancy – when I started this blog, (at the insistence of my neighbor), she and I occasionally got out to big parks, mostly taking pictures from the car as she drove, but when she became housebound with her COPD, tethered to her oxygen, I wanted to recreate the walks so she felt like she had been there with me, so that style has stayed with me all these years. When I come home from my longer walks, I do some notes to myself so I don’t forget anything later since it might be months before I write the post. That helps me when I pair the photos with the post.

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      • Nancy Ruegg says:

        Well done, Linda!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda Schaub says:

        Thank you Nancy!

        Like

  17. Zazzy says:

    What a fun filled journey around the park. I have had many animal encounters but not had a chance to visit with a fawn. And a doe stood and visited with you later! And I looked at Luc’s photo and felt sure he was paying attention to what you were saying. I’m sure he feels lonely in there. At least he gets to be outside. We have an injured eagle in the aquarium here. I felt so sorry for him. And I loved all the birds, of course. Those mallard colors are so striking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      It was a great day Zazzy – every corner I turned I seemed to have another critter encounter. The doe was staring at me, ears so alert, for the longest time. She was pregnant and I’ve returned twice looking for her or a fawn with no luck. She peeked at me through the trees then walked away, then came back again – surely she knew I was safe and meant no harm, but she was fixated on me. The mallard couple were a hoot – had a spat that morning I guess. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  18. It did look like a footprint Linda. It the green stuff an algae bloom? I have never seen baby swans, SO darn cute!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I am glad you saw that it looked like a footprint too Diane. I think that area was algae bloom as it’s a corner of the marsh by the wooden overlook with lots of reeds, so stagnant water. At other parts of the marsh it is frogbit that looks like tiny pond lilies. I was excited to see the swan family because they have been on my birdie bucket list forever. I hope next year to see a mom carrying her cygnets on her back. I was down at the River weekly looking this year. The babies look so tiny and cute next to their parents.

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  19. Pingback: July Blogger Spotlight | BosssyBabe

  20. LaShelle says:

    These are some STUNNING shots! I loved this so much. Nature is the very best place to be.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      Thank you LaShelle – this is a wonderful venue to visit. There’s always shorebirds to see, but I was especially lucky this particular day, from start to finish, with more critters than usual. It is calming to be out in nature.

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  21. J P says:

    You experienced almost every form of wildlife in the area. I half expected you to come across a platypus or a sloth. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Schaub says:

      I have had a good run at Lake Erie Metropark this year JP and have returned three more times since that day and my doe encounter. I got some fun shots this past weekend of a doe munching on the park’s prized water lotuses. If humans pick the blooms or take the seed pods, they will be fined bigtime. 🙂

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