Here’s a riddle for you …

HEADER-GOOSE CROSSING THE ROAD.jpg

Why did the chicken goose cross the road perimeter path?

To get to the other side, of course, but, also to torment the walkers who must obediently wait while each goose, including goslings, takes its good ol’ sweet time goose stepping across the pathway.  You daren’t try to rush forward when you see them coming, or you will be subjected to histrionics such as hissing, or wing flapping, not to mention being chased by said waterfowl.  The moral of the story is:  you’re a silly goose if you dare to cross this bunch!

Indeed, we walkers are a sad lot, because we must adhere to the rules that the geese at Council Point Park impose on us.  But, we are quick learners because we don’t want to be goosed by a goose – just try and cross their path, especially when the goslings are in tow, and you might turn around to find the gander of the goose brigade, head down, and in attack mode, ready to bite you in the butt!

I do enjoy watching the geese parading around the Park, but, Canada geese are often ornery and sometimes get way too big for their britches.  In a nearby city, the authorities have taken matters into their own hands and resorted to hiring “goose busters” to chase the geese away from parks and golf courses, and especially the beaches, where excessive goose droppings cause E. coli issues for the lakes.  The goose busters are border collies, a breed of dog that excels in herding animals and they have been taught to keep the geese at bay.  The dogs don’t hurt the geese, but instead bark and chase them down, thus discouraging the waterfowl to graze and make messes.  Here is the story, along with pictures of the goose busters if you would like to read more about them:  http://www.thenewsherald.com/news/metropark-unleashes-dogs-to-control-canada-geese-population-in-harrison/article_c117a79c-91ab-5a75-9934-c363c2a5fcb5.html

The downside is, if you chase the geese away, they have to go somewhere else to graze – so, what’s a goose to do?  What better place could he pick than the beautifully manicured field at Comerica Park where the Tigers and Angels were playing baseball last night?  The game was in a rain delay when a Canada goose came in for a landing on that very field.  A groundskeeper took off after it, but the poor goose was scared and ran all over, including running the bases, occasionally attempting to fly, but barely lifting off the ground.  When it finally got into flight mode, up it went, but still terrified from its ordeal, the goose flew head first into the cement video scoreboard and then dropped down one level into a horrified crowd.  Fortunately, a local veterinarian who was attending the game, quickly scooped up that traumatized feather baby, tucked him under her arm, whisked him out of the stadium, then released him into the bushes outside the ballpark.  The game resumed, the Tigers won and soon #RallyGoose was trending on Twitter.  The goose even had its own Twitter handle:  Tigers Rally Goose.  When the game was over, the veterinarian checked on the goose, which had not moved from the bushes, so the vet took him home with her where he spent the night in the basement in a dog kennel.  This morning the goose was checked out at Michigan State University Veterinary Medical Center, where x-rays revealed no broken bones or major injuries and it will be released to a wetland sanctuary in the Lansing, Michigan area in a few days. The veterinarian who helped to save the goose, threw out the first pitch before today’s baseball game.  So the story ended on a happy note; hopefully Tigers Rally Goose can connect up with his family.  If you want to read more or see the video of the goose on the loose, just click here:  https://www.freep.com/story/sports/mlb/tigers/2018/05/31/detroit-tigers-goose-comerica-park/658793002/

Council Point Park deals with the swelling Canada Geese population by spraying a grape concentrate mixture on the grassy fields around the Park. once the goslings are old enough to fly, which is approximately ten weeks after they hatch.  The mixture does not harm the geese, but they don’t like the taste, so they will go elsewhere to graze.  Soon the Canada geese will molt and lose their flying feathers, so wherever they go during that time period is a mystery, but they will return again in late Summer/early Fall.

In the meantime, we walkers will just grin and bear it as to the geese and their belligerent ways.  We grit our teeth as we step around the poop-strewn pathway and we have to walk through the dew-laden grass and get our feet wet since the geese decide to cross the pathway that is there for the humans.

Today, once again, it felt tropical outside, the result of rain last night and in the early morn.  It was already 75 degrees F (23 C) and 80% humidity when I left the house – it was 80 degrees when I returned home.   Thank goodness for the breeze because it made it more bearable.

As I walked through the neighborhoods, I noticed large puddles and sopping wet grass.  At the Park, the pathway was dry, but the grass, in need of cutting, was very wet.  I had just started on the trail and glanced ahead as the geese appeared.  They had finished traipsing through the soccer field, and were headed to the pathway and poking along, taking their sweet time.

Soon wet goose footprints appeared on the pathway …

GOOSE PRINTS BIG.jpg

GOOSE PRINTS SMALL

… as well as the human footprints of a brave soul who decided to forego wet feet, yet obediently stayed on the very edge of the perimeter path, still yielding to the geese.

HUMAN FOOTPRINTS.jpg

What I really wanted to do was get a photo of four geese, around the same size, following one another while crossing the path, similar to the Beatles walking across Abbey Road, the cover shot on their album by the same name.  But that was not to be.

STROLLING ACROSS PATHWAY.jpg

There are three families of Canada geese currently at Council Point Park.  The smallest ones are still at that cute-and-fuzzy stage.

LIGHT MUNCHKINS.jpg

Still another pair of geese has goslings that are still small enough to be cute, though just entering that gangly awkward stage.

 

MEDIUM OLD GOSLINGS

The oldest goslings at the Park now have their more permanent plumage, and …

OLD GOSLING.jpg

… as a result, some are downright homely.

OLD AND UGLY GOSLING.jpg

Okay, I said it … but, we all have those pictures in the family album where we are all arms and legs, wearing big-framed glasses or braces on our teeth, or, fresh off a “bang trim” by Mom or Dad who were scissor-happy.  But those goslings, just like you and me, are just as precious to their parents, as you were your parents’ pride and joy back in the day, no matter your appearance.

Here’s one of me for Throwback Thursday – not sure about that style with the hoop dress fad and however did I sit in the car?  And I think the bobby pins created a hairdo that was not a good look at all, especially for an eight-year-old girl!

OLD PIC OF LS.jpg

Since it is the last day of the month, here are my walking mileage stats:  354 miles walked so far in 2018.  I had hoped to have walked at least 400 miles by now, but our May was one for the record books as to rainfall.  I was willing, but Mother Nature did not cooperate.  So, to reach my goal of 1,051 (one mile more than I walked in 2017), I have 697 more miles to go and seven months to accomplish this feat with my feet.

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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32 Responses to Here’s a riddle for you …

  1. TJ says:

    I chuckled when I read about the goose in Comerica Park because I had watched the video of it earlier today–or most of it. I don’t think I saw it to the end because I got interrupted. I’ve thought about getting a couple geese because they make good guards, but I think we have enough poultry.

    Our local airport had a dog who chased wildlife away from the runways. He was cool and became an internet sensation. You can watch a news report about him here:

    Sadly, he died a few months ago after a battle with cancer. Our whole community mourned.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I did read about that dog recently TJ, in fact maybe a week ago or so, I watched online where they had a memorial service for him and I remember they cited how important his job was because of bird strikes for airplanes. Very sad him passing away from cancer and he looked so vibrant doing his “job”, just like those border collies would.

      That video of the goose at the end made you think he was a goner for sure when he smacked full force into the cement video board. I think he would have been a goner if not for that kindly vet.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Rebecca says:

    I enjoyed the geese stories and photos! And I couldn’t help but smile at the childhood photo, which looks very similar to those of my sisters and I — bobby pin hairdo and all. I guess we couldn’t afford the hoop shirt. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you enjoyed them Rebecca. I’ve seen a few sites on Facebook where people post clothes they wore when they were kids and I often see styles from my era – I was born in 1956. The pin curls were done on Saturday night for a nice ‘do to go with dressing up for Sunday school. I actually think this was a slip with the wooden hoop that “threaded” through it, though I can’t say for sure. And there were crinolines as well, which made your dresses and skirts pouf out.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Great story about the goose at the Tiger game! You are right about the goslings being a bit homely… very similar to the awkward teenage years most of us went through.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I thought is was a great story as well Janis. Thank goodness for the veterinarian as she likely saved that traumatized goose’ life. I felt I could not call the larger goslings homely without including a oddball photo of myself from circa 1964.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ann Marie stevens says:

    Miss Linda…………………………….you were as acute as a button way back then at 8 years old………………I enjoyed the informative article on ways to control those Canada geese……….nice pictures of the goslings growing larger and larger by the day……………………and I love the goose tracks too…………………………………

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Ann Marie – actually I picked that pic because my mom would put my hair in pin curls every Saturday night, so I would look nice for Sunday School the next day … I hated those pin curls and that fuzzy-looking hair! Do you remember those hoop slips or skirts and dresses the little girls wore back then? The goslings are getting big and I wanted to show the three different sizes of goslings … one batch are still cute and look like ducklings. It was very soggy on the grass, so the wet prints came out really well!

      Like

  5. John says:

    The geese seems to not bother about people at all. Here we don´t come closer that maybe 100 meters, but we don’t have any in any park nearby, only mallards, chickens and tame geese who iis bigger. We had exotic birds as well (in large outhouse)l but they got ill and they have to everyone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      John – the geese are always a bit cantankerous and last week at Elizabeth Park I tossed out some crackers and the one gander started to charge at me for no reason – head down and they crouch and start walking very fast, kind of like that swan I encountered back in the Winter … everyone makes sure they go off the path when they have the goslings. I made an error in my post and put “ghost busters” … thinking about the movie and song, but they have those border collies which help keep the geese from infiltrating “people areas” … soon they will be gone, maybe by mid-June, and no more goose pictures til late Summer/early Fall. They don’t have any tame geese around here, even at the other Parks unfortunately. This is the last day of our heat wave and we have more moderate temps beginning tomorrow thankfully … but a rainy and stormy day on Sunday.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. susieshy45 says:

    These geese look like mini ostriches, no wonder they are aggressive. I would be petrified of them. I am glad you are giving them space.
    Your geese stories are hilarious -the vet saving the story won my heart.
    Love your work Linda.
    To me your stories are worth as much as James Herriot animal stories, to which comment I must add that you should keep these stories together and publish a book- the animals of Michigan ?
    Susie

    Liked by 1 person

  7. lindasschaub says:

    You know what Susie – I kept looking at that last gosling picture trying to think what he reminded me of … you’re right, an ostrich. I was thinking it even looked a little prehistoric to me. Not like a goose! I am glad you are enjoying the stories Susie – I made a mistake and put “ghost busters” instead of “goose busters” and remembered this morning for some odd reason, thinking “did I put goose or ghost?” and of course I made the mistake – three times! I have corrected it now, but too late as it already went out to a few people who subscribe via e-mail and early bird readers like yourself. Thank you for saying that about these little stories – I did enjoy James Herriot’s stories very much. I have to get back to the squirrels, my pals at the Park – I’ve put them on the back burner to concentrate on all the animal “babies” … meanwhile today is the last hot day here for a while – thank goodness. I don’t know how you do it – we had five days of 90 degrees or better the last five days in May… today will also be hot, then a storm, then cooler weather … 70s.

    Like

  8. That poor goose almost got her goose cooked! Thank goodness for veterinarians!
    Your childhood smile is priceless! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, that goose was lucky as it might not have made it. The veterinarian was on the “Mitch Albom Show” tonight and she said the goose was quite dazed when it hit the board then fell an entire level down – if you saw the video, it made you feel a little sick watching what happened. She scooped it up, holding the wings down and held its neck in place. They didn’t say in the story, but the Tigers organization had three security guards watch the area where she put the goose to make sure no one messed with it. When she left at the conclusion of the game, she was concerned as it was too quiet, so took it with her. She said there were some problems with its flying feathers and she thinks that is why it could “lift off” properly to get out of the stadium. They figure the goose was bruised up, but nothing broken. Whew!

      Thanks for saying that Tom. I am so glad I digitized those pictures – they still need a good amount of tweaking but they are nice to pull out and use in these blog posts.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. AJ says:

    I don’t like it when the geese hiss at me!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Especially when you’re running – you get the feeling something is behind you. 🙂 One got mad at me today AJ and I stepped out of its way and it got mad anyway. They are especially bad now when they have the goslings with them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • AJ says:

        Yes I am very careful around them as my mom got bit by a goose when she was little

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yikes! They are fickle – one minute you walk by and they are fine; the next time you get hissed at or wings flapped. You don’t know how to read them sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • AJ says:

        They can be vicious with their babies near too:(

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, worse then. A Canada goose attacked a golfer here about a month ago. The goose had a nest nearby the golf course and he was not near it, and had no intention of disturbing the nest, but the goose thought otherwise and attacked the guy, flying down and knocking him over and he and his golf clubs nearby all went flying and then she tried to pummel him more on the ground. His golf partner videotaped the whole scene. He was not hurt but that goose was very aggressive. Like your mom getting bitten – the old expression “once bitten, twice shy” applies here.

        Liked by 1 person

      • AJ says:

        Wow! I hope his golf partner helped him too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        No, he just made a video of it and was laughing. I guess if the guy was hurt it would have been different, but still …

        Liked by 1 person

      • AJ says:

        Oh that’s okay then. I thought the guy had been hurt

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        His pride mostly but I image he was pretty scared because the goose attacked him from above and flew into him and knocked him on the ground and was pecking him. So not seriously hurt, but bad enough I would think. Then when he fell, he pulled the golf bag carrier on top of him – the other guy was laughing and taking a picture. SMH sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. I loved this story. The “all legs and arms#” part made me chuckle too. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks and I am glad I made you smile … that is exactly what they look like – we called them “the awkward years”. 🙂

      Like

      • 😆😆 Yes the awkward years certainly leave a mark in our lives 😆

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        They sure do Zena. But everyone looked like that at the same time, unless you were compared to your siblings. I didn’t have any siblings so I wonder if I lucked out? My parents did take a lot of pictures of me, considering they did not have a lot of money and back then everything was on film. You thought twice before clicking the camera and taking a lot of pictures. If you saw how many pictures I take of squirrels and birds and get home to upload the images to the computer and find tails or snouts missing. 🙂 I am no photographer, just lucky sometimes when they pose for me.

        Like

      • The Joys of cameras on phones and digital cameras today makes life so much easier. ☺

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I know and now people can document their children growing up and have a virtual photo album right there on Facebook. We had neighbors years ago, and they had a fairly large family and not a lot of money, so picture taking was a luxury, such a luxury that they only took pictures of their family at holidays (the whole table) and each child on its birthday. They did not travel or take Summer vacations. They never developed the film (black and white) and after they died, the kids were cleaning out the house and found the camera in a closet – developed the photos and all they out clear as a bell! My mom had a Baby Brownie square camera with a little strap and passed it along to me and I had several pictures taken when I was young with that camera.

        Like

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