The wasps are giddy!

After Labor Day, the unofficial end of Summer, it seems we just morph into the harvest and Halloween season and go with the flow.  Mums have replaced weather-beaten petunias in porch pots and I’ve already seen the first Halloween décor in the ‘hood.    The whole morning walk has changed dramatically the past few weeks.  Not only must I detour two blocks over due to the significant construction on my regular route, but the angle of the sun is different – the sun is getting up later every day and it sure is starting to look like Fall at Council Point Park.

Here in southeast Michigan, this season has had absolutely no rhyme or reason to it and our Summer chugs along, with merely ten days left until Fall … on the calendar anyway.

We had about five days of below-average temps, so long sleeves, or even a light hoodie were welcome in the morning – yesterday it was 74 degrees F (23 C) and 94% humidity when I stepped out the door for my morning walk.  Ugh!  The homeowners who closed up their pools are wistful for making such a hasty decision. Because Fall kept stepping on Summer’s toes, Mother Nature punished Fall for doing so with some whopper storms last night and more are on the way today and tomorrow – that effectively shows Fall who’s boss!

It’s apple cider time! I popped into Meijer the other day and the harvest goodies take up almost as much space in the grocery store as the Halloween candy, costumes and décor.  Pumpkin “everything” seems to compete with caramel apples and of course apple cider.

Speaking of apple cider

The wasps are giddy at Council Point Park.  The wormy apples are plentiful and gathering on the ground and across the perimeter path.  They are either dropping off the tree on their own, or yanked off their stems by the squirrels.  The squirrels and birds take a few bites, then leave the rest of the apple on the ground to turn brown and rot.  Walkers step on them, squashing them nearly to a pulp, then the heat ferments those apples so walking under the tree is like opening a container of apple cider. 

What apples the squirrels and birds choose to discard, the wasps are quick to hone in on, so any time you walk past this apple tree, the wasps are buzzing about … let’s just say that buzzed buzzers must be avoided if at all possible.  A fellow walker told me his dog was stung by them a few years ago at this very location.

The squirrels’ mindset is “Winter is on the way. Must. Gather. Nuts. NOW!

The squirrels scamper over to greet me and they do their usual begging routines …

… or perhaps act nonchalantly like “oh, were you going to favor me with some peanuts Linda?”

Sucker that I am, I soon drop nuts near their front paws like they are tiny princes.

Occasionally they’ll stop to munch a peanut …

… but mostly they scamper away to hide those nuts, and soon their paws are fast and furiously digging holes here, there and everywhere …

… so much so that nut gathering becomes a blur. So much for photo ops, huh?

And then there are dribs and drabs of color around Council Point Park.  

I’ve been walking at this Park since 2013 and it has always amazed me that the raggedy bushes and spindly saplings that grow along the Ecorse Creek banks are the first to show their shades of Autumn. 

I’ve already seen colorful Poplar and Maple leaves littering the pathway or pavilion area.  

There are berries that the birds delight in eating.

Weeds and wildflowers provide a touch of color to otherwise blah greenery near the Creek banks.

I kind of like these delicate white wildflowers.

Even the algae bloom makes a colorful, but yucky statement.

The burrs aren’t as vibrant as the berries and blossoms, but make a stunning, late-Summer appearance. They remind us that days of “brrrrrrrrrr” are on the horizon.

About lindasschaub

This is my first blog and I enjoy writing each and every post immensely. I started a walking regimen in 2011 and decided to create a blog as a means of memorializing the people, places and things I see on my daily walks. I have always enjoyed people watching, and so my blog is peppered with folks I meet, or reflections of characters I have known through the years. Often something piques my interest, or evokes a pleasant memory from my memory bank, and this becomes a “slice o’ life” blog post that day. I respect and appreciate nature and my interaction with Mother Nature’s gifts is also a common theme. Sometimes the most-ordinary items become fodder for points to ponder over and touch upon. My career has been in the legal field and I have been a legal secretary for over three decades, primarily working in downtown Detroit, and now working from my home. I graduated from Wayne State University with a degree in print journalism in 1978, although I’ve never worked in that field. I like to think this blog is the writer in me finally emerging!! Walking and writing have met and shaken hands and the creative juices are flowing once again in Walkin’, Writin’, Wit & Whimsy – hope you think so too.
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87 Responses to The wasps are giddy!

  1. Fall has certainly swept in on time unlike spring which dallied in the Bahamas until June!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Michael says:

    Wow how gorgeous… how quickly the seasons turn

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Fall has always been my favorite season Michael, even though it means that Winter is on the way. The red, orange and yellow leaf shades are just gorgeous. On my bucket list is to go to see the Fall foliage on the East Coast. The “Leaf Peepers” as they are known, come from all across the nation to view the colors and train trips are very popular to view the leaves from a distance.

      Like

  3. Shelley says:

    You’ve captured such lovely photos of the change of seasons. Those squirrel ones are adorable! I don’t know how you get so close, manage to hold the camera, and toss out peanuts at the same time?

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thank you Shelley – like you, it’s my favorite season. Those wasps are everywhere – buzzing around the walkers, but more interested in the fermenting apples. As to the squirrels, they are adorable aren’t they? That was Parker looking up at me with the sad look on his face – does it not remind you of a dog making you feel guilty if you don’t share your cheeseburger with him? I should have said it was Parker. I use a mesh bag and hang it from my fanny pack – the bag zips up the front and I open the zipper, and dig into the Ziploc bag with my left hand and I use the digital compact so I can use it one-handed with my right hand. Pretty soon I’ll be in a coat, and can put the peanuts in my pocket – dig in with my left hand, operate the camera with my right hand. It’s tough with the DSLR – I have to wait until they are fed to take pictures.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        The bees are fascinating to watch. Thank you for elaborating on your technique. You’re very clever!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        You’re welcome Shelley and it is definitely harder to do with the bigger camera as it requires two hands … this time of year, they scramble away to hide nuts more than sit and eat them, unless they’re hungry. Last year I took apples and mini pumpkins for them … two different trips, apples once, pumpkins another time. I used to line them up and down the perimeter path and they liked that … but I had to stop after I saw the Cooper’s Hawk swoop down and try to grab one of the squirrels who luckily escaped. I still gave them apples and pumpkins but tucked them close to the bushes so they could escape. So, interestingly, if I give them peanuts, they are busy with the peanuts and ignore the pumpkins or apples – people who walk later in the morning than me see them munching down later. So this year I must do it on a Saturday or Sunday morning so I can hang out for photo ops. It looks like I went on a Saturday last year, on Sweetest Day to share pumpkins – this was before we were following one another. I could find it easy since I knew I wrote about it on Sweetest Day.
        https://lindaschaubblog.net/2018/10/20/sharin-the-love/

        Liked by 1 person

      • Shelley says:

        Aw, you’re so kind to the critters! I’m heading over to read the sweetest day post!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Joni says:

    Great photos as usual Linda. You do have an eye. Those wasps don’t look like my wasps. Mine had yellow stripes and I think they were just yellowjackets although Pest Control guy said not. He said they were too busy for yellow jackets. They’re gone now, so that $170 was money well spent. Hard to feel fall-like in such humidity!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Thanks Joni – I had to share the shots of the wasps that were sipping on “hard cider” from those fermented apples. Under the apple tree, it smells as strong as apple cider when you open it up. You’re right about the money well spent – soon they’ll be a distant memory and you wish you hired him sooner. He must know his stuff and that’s why he offered to spray again no charge if you saw wasps again. Fellow blogger Tom, made this comment on this post which makes me wonder if the pest control guy told you if they might show up somewhere else in your yard/house?
      ********
      My sister-in-law was stung by a whole bunch of Yellow Jacket Wasps recently. She raked right over their ground den. Wasps do not normally attack unless provoked.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        He didn’t say anything about them showing up elsewhere, but then he sprayed all along the back of the house siding, (not just the immediate area) and checked all the other sides of the house. A few days later I saw little bits of white powder drifting down onto the deck, so he gave them a good dose. I think he did a good job. He said it’s getting late in the year for them anyway. He also told me there was no queen bee. He said there are all kinds of wasps – he’d been in business 37 years and had 19 employees, but is down to 12 as it’s hard to find good workers. He does a lot of building contracts. He had a very fancy bee suit which you’ll see when I post about it in my children’s story!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I’m glad you had a good contractor – we got that small company eventually and they figured out the nest (even though I had pointed to the fixture in the ceiling and said I saw a flying ant disappear in there), but many years with carpenter ants and no solution. It was discouraging. A bee suit – that is interesting. A fellow blogger, Ruth, lives in Michigan, not near me, and they have honey bees and she has posted pics of her husband tending the hives in the past. They live on a small farm and are resourceful with all the produce they grow, their honey – I don’t know ifthey sell the honey, but they do grow a lot of garlic and sell that. She has an interesting blog about their farm life and Ruth makes soap and sells it. I’ll look for her site and send it – I don’t know it off the top of my head and she doesn’t post a lot in the Summer as her/husband are busy with farm activities. I looked up “Please Don’t Eat the Soap” but it’s not that. You would like her.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I already follow Ruth Linda…..she has an interesting blog and a nice life in the country.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I didn’t know that – yes she does and I tell her I learn things I never knew reading it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I know you don’t have a lot of time to read, but I follow this lawyer from the mid-west and he’s so funny. He posts every Thurs, and while I don’t read all his posts, he posts about jazz and stuff, his wry sense of humour is just my style. Here’s a link to his blog about trying to unsubscribe to the newspaper. https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/93094320/posts/11548

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Thanks Joni – I have saved this link. I will look at it – I can identify with trying to unsubscribe to sites … they will not turn you loose sometimes! I once followed a lawyer in Alaska … she had lived there for years and was very funny. She was actually part of the Mysteristas group I told you about, a group of women who are mystery writers. I wished she had written more stories about living in Alaska where she lived and had her practice.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Here’s another one called No Fair – about his non-visit to the state fair a few blocks away. I just find his wry sense of humor funny, but when I look at the comments below, mostly from guys as he’s into cars, no one ever comments on the humor, except for Annie – another one I follow who does discussion blogs. So many great writers on here who don’t have many followers. https://wordpress.com/read/blogs/93094320/posts/11535

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I am taking a few hours here this morning to at least get through comments, maybe a walk if it stops raining but just in the neighborhood and will hunker down and work in the house … we have thunderstorms later unfortunately. I read the other post you gave me … the subscription post was very funny and I commented and also followed him. Thank you for passing this blogger along – we all need more humor in our lives … I know I do!

        Like

      • Joni says:

        I don’t read all his posts, I skip the jazz and cars, but do read the humor.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I likely will do the same as you – I don’t follow cars and never been a fan of jazz.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        I hate jazz. He knows his jazz posts are the least read, as he analyzed his stats one time. I guess jazz enthusiasts appreciate them – to me it’s like chalk on a blackboard.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        PS. Those wasps sure do know how to party! I have them singing in my kids story, they make great backup singers, but maybe a little hard cider would help in warming up the vocal cords!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes they do – I have no doubt the fermented apples are like when you see birds or squirrels after they eat fermented berries – the birds can’t fly straight, and the squirrels keep taking tumbles in the yard. I’ve seen some of those videos – they are very funny.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Do you mind if I have my wasps drunk on cider in my kids story? I guess I am stealing your idea…..

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Go ahead and use it Joni – if you want these pics in the post, just take a screenshot or I will send you the pics. I have more I took, but they look the same as these.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joni says:

        Thanks, I had them partying on the deck after a bit too much cider. Thanks but I’m good for pictures – I used a couple of cartoons for the wasps and the vole, as I just could not stomach looking at a real vole, and figured my readers would be turned off too. I won’t put the post up until the following week, as I have the Plein Air Painting one for next week, which I may do on Tues, so as to avoid that Sept 20th protest climate thing. I know it might sound weird, but I had fun doing it and I discuss what inspires creativity in the post, so it’s not just a kid’s story. I even mention Parker as being a muse – as I promised I’d help make him famous!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I am looking forward to that … it sounds fun. They both do. Hard cider for wasps. When I saw the cider mill last week I was going to stop there and get some pics to use with the wasps post … I took the pics of the wasps the day before, but then there was a group of motorcycle riders (100 or so) and a detou,r so didn’t do that. It turns out they rode last year for a couple who was killed by a car and the money was collected to participate and food at the end sponsored by a bar … all the money was given to the young kids in a fund – they live with relatives now … so that was the same weekend in 2018 according to what I discovered by Googling – I could find nothing on that ride which was the same street and same weekend in 2019 –
        I suspect it was the same deal, but I couldn’t verify it so left it out of the post. My next post will likely be the community garden I took photos of at Heritage Park – several weeks ago. I’d better get it out before long and produce is no longer in gardens, but I will say it was shot awhile ago. I will do a quick post mid-week before the 20th as well. I don’t want to do any plug-ins and avoid that issue as well.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Ally Bean says:

    You’re farther along the seasonal path than we are here. I have yet to see any leaf that’s turned color, but will try to remember to snap a pic when I do. As always, I love your squirrel friends. They are a photogenic bunch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, in fact those yellow Poplar leaves have been littering the pathway since mid-August. I don’t understand it, because we had a lot of rain in May and June. Last year due to the late Spring, lots of rain in May, but not much the entire Summer, caused our leaves to drop right after Labor Day. Fall is my favorite time of year, even though it means Winter is on the way. The squirrels have lots of personality don’t they? Really, they are no different than a pet who is constantly looking for treats and will be shameless about making you feel guilty if you don’t provide them on cue.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. My sister-in-law was stung by a whole bunch of Yellow Jacket Wasps recently. She raked right over their ground den. Wasps do not normally attack unless provoked. We have a large wasp nest on the side of our house… and i do not mind one bit. They have respected me too.
    Those burrs are Milk Thistle plants in the fall (dry) stage. Milk Thistle is very good for the liver. I take the herbal form of it now and then. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      That scary about the wasps. A fellow blogger had a wasp nest and they were able to get into her house. She sprayed and covered the hole (my suggestion) but covering the hole was not recommended. That is what I did with the black wasps I had earlier in the Summer. Joni had to resort to pest control and did that Monday and they are now gone.

      I just looked up the image of a Milk Thistle in bloom – that is what I see the Goldfinch sitting on. I’ve only had one Goldfinch sighting this Summer – sometimes I have seen one every day. And I saw the white soft down a few weeks ago. Thank you for the name Tom – I only called them burrs because they manage to get caught on my clothes sometimes if I get too close to the Creek banks.

      I looked at the medicinal properties – also good for inflammatory issues – it must help your arthritis too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Milk Thistle might help some with arthritis but i take other herbs that are way better for that.
        There are beautiful Thistle plants growing around a pond that i used to frequent a lot. But now a crabby, old farmer put a No Trespassing sign on the area. There are plenty of other places for me to take nature photos in our area, so i don’t mind too much. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        There is one in every crowd – you were just taking pictures for goodness sake. Your woodsy area and all the parks around here will be flooded tomorrow if you had weather like we did in Michigan – two bouts of torrential rain today. It came down in buckets and we had severe weather warnings up for most of the afternoon. I’m going to welcome Fall which I hope is less volatile. The mosquitoes will be out in droves after this … they are bad enough already.

        Like

  7. Laurie says:

    Oooh…those hornets! They love smashed apples, especially in the fall. Once a friend and I smashed a few apples on a dirt road to try to attract butterflies. We did get a bunch of butterflies and were having a great time watching them when the wasps and hornets began showing up. Ugh! They chased the butterflies away.
    Beautiful nature photos, Linda. I love the teasels. My son took a photo of some teasels once and framed it for me. I still have it hanging on my wall.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes Laurie – they were going crazy buzzing around the ground and I can see how that dog got stung investigating them. I didn’t realize the butterflies would enjoy the smashed apples – how fun to watch them sipping on apple juice, until the wasps and hornets had to crash the party! I like the teasels with a little sun on them, that shows off just how sharp those teeth are – I know the last two pictures look similar, but I honed in on them up close and thought it was an interesting picture even though they are such a drab color.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Laurie says:

        I used to have a black lab named Casey. Once Casey got into a yellowjackets’ nest when we were out for a hike. We ran as fast as we could down to a little pond, and I made Casey go in to get rid of all the wasps that were still clinging to her. Ugh! I hate those wasps.

        Like

      • lindasschaub says:

        Oh that’s awful Laurie – yes, they attack and “gang up” on you. Poor Casey – thank goodness there was a pond to get them off before she was stung all over. A fellow blogger said there was a wasp’s nest in a pile of leaves and his sister was raking leaves and the wasps came out in a swarm. You can’t be too careful anytime – I never reach into the leaves or anything in the yard … I have a pair of those yard claws that look like a pair of cymbals and pick up leaves or debris that way – keeps me in my comfort zone.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Laurie says:

        Good idea! I had a friend who was pulling up weeds and disturbed an underground nest one time. They all came swarming out at her, but she hightailed it into her house.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Just something else to worry about! The wasps don’t understand “accidental uncovering of their nest” either!

        Like

  8. WalkFrederick says:

    Thanks for all the lovely fall pictures. I’ve been enjoying the change of season, but haven’t documented it much. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Good to hear from you Michelle. I’ve missed your walks by yourself and with the kids. I guess your colors in Maryland will probably be about the same schedule as here in SE Michigan. Now that school is back in session, the only chance to escape on a walk is when the kids are in school, unless you walk with them after school. It takes a while to get back to that school routine doesn’t it?

      Like

      • WalkFrederick says:

        It is nice having time to go on walks again! I’ve been on a couple just this week. I really need to start taking pictures and blogging about them again.

        Colors here seem to be about the same. We have the same raggedy bushes. 🙂 Ours may be just a bit more red.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Glad you got out on a couple of walks this week Michelle. I know it’s difficult with the kids and their school regimens and activities. I miss seeing your trips around Frederick. Interesting that those raggedy bushes seem to get colors first – last year our trees dropped their leaves early in September as we had drought conditions in July and August and we had a hard freeze shortly after Fall arrived. The weather is crazy. We have a stormy day and the first wave of storms to begin this morning – since it is also Friday the 13th, I’m staying put.

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  9. I’ve heard that when Apples (or any fruit for that matter) begin to decompose they can ferment making them mildly alcoholic. I’ve heard of drunk bears wandering around and assume other animals too.
    So I see no reason why the Wasps giddy nature isn’t because they are drunk! Making them more aggressive.
    On another note,Its amazing that squirrels can remember where they plant their treasures while everything is covered in snow. They must use the trees as benchmarks and have excellent spacial recognition abilities!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      I have actually seen videos in the past showing birds and squirrels that are drunk from eating fermented berries … the videos are funny because the birds can’t fly straight and the squirrels take a tumble or fall over their feet while running around the yard. Here is a funny video with a squirrel who ate too many fermented crabapples:

      I have read some amazing stories about the squirrels’ habits in hiding their nuts … they may look like they run around willy-nilly and hide them anywhere, but according to the article, they remember where they put them to dig them up later. At the Park, with all those acres of grassy grounds, I find it hard to believe they could remember, but you will see them grab a peanut and run with it – they get a respectable distance away from where I fed them, then will stop and look around as if pondering where to put them. The problem is they can hide the peanuts and acorns as much as they want, but if the ground is frozen they cannot dig them up, even with sharp claws. And the snow – forget about that too. The last few years the Park maintenance people have been leaving the picnic tables under the pavilion roof – I don’t know if that is because they expect people will be sitting there in the Winter after walking on the trails (when there is no ice or snow on the trails since they don’t clear them) or they forgot or didn’t have time to haul them into the barbed-wire fenced-in area they keep them in til Spring. So I seized that opportunity to leave peanuts there for my pals for after I leave. I make sure they see me putting them there. I don’t understand why they don’t just store them in the nest … I realize they need room to curl up against each other for body heat when it is bitter cold, but maybe another nest-type receptacle to keep nuts handy? Perhaps I am thinking like a human?

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      • sorry Linda that link does not work.
        I do not know but they might not store them in their nest because other squirrels would raid it. Thats why they hide them I bet. With frozen ground I wonder how they feed themselves?

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Hmm – I wonder why? Go on YouTube and search “drunk squirrel had too many crab apples” and I just checked and that was the key words used … it is the first video that comes up, a black squirrel in the snow.
        That makes sense – someone (critters or humans) always has to take what is not theirs. I’d like to slip Parker a few Pay Day bars – lots of peanuts – to tuck away somewhere for a snowy and cold day. I can’t imagine how they get to food – there is no way they can dig the frozen ground … I’m sure the berries are all gone by then too.
        Perhaps they resort to raiding neighborhood feeders but surely it is not enough to feed all of them. They liked the sunflower bells I left on the picnic table last year at Christmastime and all the seeds I left in a tray for the birds as well, but likely the birds never saw a single seed. At Elizabeth Park, there is a “feeder station” –
        all it is is a small tree and a few shepherds hooks and people have taken it upon themselves to come by and load birdseed and load up the suet feeders. It is just people dropping by and they begin in Fall – I tried that on the picnic table … they ate the suet last … peanuts and sunflower seeds are like dessert I guess.

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      • I was wondering about evolution. What did they do when there weren’t any humans around? They must hide food above ground? Maybe inside trees?

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Inside trees makes sense, in the hollows that you see sometimes. That’s a good question because surely the berries could not last all Winter. I’ll have to remember and look if the apples up high in that tree are still there when it is very cold – but they would be frozen too I’d think. The pine cones are too big to hide and besides they will get dried out. The squirrels don’t eat them when they opened and brown and dry, just when they are soft and closed … they sometimes have a pine cone they are gnawing on and will ignore me as I walk by – they must have some taste and nutritional value, though I have some pictures I’ve taken of pine cones up close and the resin is just dripping off them – wouldn’t the resin gum up their throats and digestive system?

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      • I think they eat the seeds inside the cones.Great protein!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Pine nuts and if you buy them in a market they are expensive – or used to be when I shopped at a big produce market which specialized in items not available in the grocery store. Squirrels are smart cookies!

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      • all animals are smart,only humans are dumb.

        Liked by 2 people

      • lindasschaub says:

        I agree – not only smart, but resourceful. Humans … these days if they can’t find it on the internet, they are scr*wed.

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      • lindasschaub says:

        That was very interesting Wayne – thank you for sending it to me. I said I often watched them run off then they sit on their haunches as if analyzing their next move, then they scamper off again. So, they likely are sizing up that peanut and where to stash it. The squirrels are intelligent … they are just as smart as the robins tilting their head to hear the worms. I was fascinated by that as well.

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      • everything out there is far more intelligent than what we give them credit for!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I agree – I said for years that people don’t give birds credit, calling them “birdbrains” – not true at all. I saw it for myself. But we interacted with our budgies and canaries all the time so we figured we had the opportunity to notice how smart they were, but when you see it in wild animals … you know for sure it is them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I watched that video Linda,and it doesn’t make sense. There is snow everywhere meaning the crab apples would be not only frozen but buried and long gone (eaten)
        That squirrel has eaten something that is poisoned I bet.

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      • lindasschaub says:

        I just wrote you a comment wondering if the apples are frozen in the Winter when you wondered how the squirrels were sustained in the Winter before humans fed them. I wonder what it ate/drank then? I’ll bet they bury the apples and pine cones too, though I’ve never seen them do that before. I should reach out to the DNR and ask them. The squirrel didn’t have a problem going down the tree initially, it was trying to climb up the piles of snow and like a pogo stick, jumping up and down.

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      • fermentation requires heat. Before the snow flies all the organic goodies would be consumed.One thing about Nature there is no waste.
        Yes,ask a professional but ask someone in a university!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, the last time I reached out to the DNR it was to ask about the tufted-eared squirrel … it was not a true tassel-eared squirrel with the fur that sticks up straight in back of their ears … those type of squirrels are small like a gray or black squirrel. This was a regular-size fox squirrel and had big tufts of hair behind its ears – gave it a real different look and no other characteristics indicated that it had mated with a tassel-eared squirrel.
        So the DNR writes back “your squirrel had a bad hair day!” I thanked them but was not amused and I put their answer in my post about this squirrel. I did ask them about an odd-looking bird I found one time. I sent the photo and they responded “good photo and good find – it is a green heron.” That bird had its neck pulled in and had huge yellow feet and was down at the marina where I used to walk sometimes. I stopped walking there as I have to walk across four sets of railroad tracks and there’s nowhere to park nearby … I should go again before the bad weather sets in. The cement bridge overlooks the marina and there are always lots of mallards paddling around the dock areas.

        Like

      • DNR might be a good source but I’d go to a local University to ask detailed questions.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        I may just contact where you sent me the link yesterday about the squirrel intelligence.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Hard to believe that fall is arriving already! The leaves have started to turn here too and the visitors at my bird feeders are increasing quite a bit. I picked most of the apples on my tree, but left the ones that have been nibbled on for the critters. Wasps are annoying! Last year we had a lot of them and even had to call someone out, but there weren’t that many this summer. Maybe the cooler and rainier weather kept them away? Great post, Linda!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Glad you liked this post Sabine. The bigger trees are still green, but it amazes me how the small bushes’ leaves are already so vibrant. Hope it does not mean an early Fall like last year (a hard freeze the third week in September).

      Liked by 1 person

      • Summer went by way too fast for me! Hopefully we won’t get any frost anytime soon here!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        My sentiments exactly Sabine – it was a tumultuous Summer for me … too many things going on, work wise and house wise and it seemed at least once a week having severe weather in the forecast … all of just unnerved me. I had some plans today but they are both outside events and it will rain/storm all afternoon. I will get out for a walk as soon as the morning rain stops. I hope the frost and black ice are not in the cards for a while. Sometimes the pathway tends to get coated with black ice come October … October unfortunately is just 2 weeks away!

        Liked by 1 person

      • If it makes you feel any better, Linda, it’s raining here today and most likely all week. We don’t usually get frost here until late November. In the meantime I’m planning to spend as much time outside to soak up the sun while we can see it in the sky! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Well that’s not too promising is it Sabine? Maybe they will be wrong – that was us last week, with either torrential rain or severe weather the norm most of the week and the heat spiked up again. I agree with you Sabine – enjoy that sunshine. I’ve been indulging myself and doing that almost all Summer once we got past those rainy weekends through April, most of May and part of June … sometimes to just escape here and all the house mishaps Sometimes you just have to seize the day! (Of course I come home and look at the house and yard and cringe just a little.)

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ll keep my fingers crossed for decent weather this week, but we do need rain! Everything seems so dry! I don’t cringe about undone chores anymore! 😉 It’s important to do fun stuff while the sun is shining!

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Yes, sometimes you look and see cracks in the dirt where the grass is sparse. I have some areas that don’t grow good grass and it is amazing how deep the cracks are. I agree with you Sabine – I never was like that before when younger, but now I get out as much as possible when the sun shines – already the sun is getting up later and setting so much sooner. The last full week of Summer – can we have a “re-do and pretend it is just Memorial Day and go from there?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m in on the summer extension! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  11. clarejk2014 says:

    I love the colours of autumn. The apples were falling from my tree in the garden and the wasps seemed to be enjoying the apples. I was quite glad when the wasps had gone. Parker reminds me of my cheeky guinea pig Tom, who has now perfected a ‘come feed me’ look. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      Yes, those wasps get into a big group and dining and sipping on the fermented apples get very aggressive – hope they don’t go after your pear tree Clare. Is it big enough to bear a pear or two? I remember it was small when you showcased it earlier this year. Parker is just like Tom – last year I was either taking a picture or talking to someone and did not go into my stash to give him peanuts right away and he started climbing up my bare leg! I was a little horrified – I was not scared of him doing any more than trying to reach the mesh bag where I have the the Ziploc bag inside there, but did worry about him scratching my bare legs with his claws. From now on, he gets fed right away when I first see him! (Spoiled rotten.)

      Liked by 1 person

  12. It’s the first year we won’t be picking up the apples from our 3 trees. The wasps loved them and we had to be careful we didn’t make them mad. Sure glad that’s done with but I miss the apples!

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Prior... says:

    Hi L Regarding this:
    Mums have replaced weather-beaten petunias in porch pots and I’ve already seen the first Halloween décor in the ‘hood.

    – I see it a little here too – but I refuse to buy mums yet – nope – and Virginia will stay warmer a little longer than some other places up north so we can keep the Mandevilla and vinca and daisies a little longer

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      They had the mum out in front of the grocery store back in August already … everything moves along much too quickly to be honest and soon the Christmas displays will be out. I was once at a farm market and they had beautiful mums displayed at three for $10.00. It was a great deal as they were flowering and full of buds all different colors. Made to trips and planted them all around one corner of the yard … no rain predicted, but we had three days of rain, those flowers were weatherbeaten and leggy, some of them the soil washed away as new planting soil … what a disappointment. I like when people have the big displays of mums. I went to a nursery last year and took some pictures of all their mums displayed on straw bales with scarecrows about … I like scarecrows and always try to take pictures of them as the harvest season progresses.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        I saw huge pots of mums yesterday for 4.99 – and almost grabbed a couple – but I cannot yet!

        and sorry about the disappointment with the mums you bought – and it puzzles me as to why some plantings thrive and some flop – well you mentioned the weather and all – but sometimes it is a mystery

        Liked by 1 person

      • lindasschaub says:

        Too warm for your mums I suspect – they are needy in that they need a lot of water, but too much rain just trashed mine. I lost some and some never looked the same and got really “leggy” so I had to pull them out eventually. I’ve seen annuals and perennials planted side by side and one flourishes and the one fizzles. It is a mystery.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Prior... says:

        😊🌺🌺🌺

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Funny, my sister-in-law (who was visiting with my brother from out-of-town over the last few days) and I talked about the word “raggedy,” its usage and possible origins. And now I see you used it in your blog post. We both decided that we really liked the word, especially when used to describe how someone feels (as in “I feel raggedy today”). Anyway, lovely pictures of the changing season in your area. Still no sign of fall here yet… and I definitely don’t feel raggedy today!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lindasschaub says:

      That is funny Janis – I love that word as it fits the bill for so many things. I just commented to a fellow blogger (Anne Mehrling) that I feel badly when I see my closets of work clothes and the way I look in the house now. I started working from home rather suddenly and I really used to love getting dressed up for work – the lure of working at home outweighed putting on makeup, getting dressed up and enduring a commute. I am raggedy looking many days. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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